1. BYH Official Poll: What are the things that you should consider before buying herds?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  2. BYH Featured Thread: I'm woolin' it!
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. 2017 BYC Calendar SUPER SALE!
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  4. Dismiss Notice
  5. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)
    Dismiss Notice

Sheep don't understand the concept of shade

Discussion in 'Behaviors & Handling Techniques - Sheep' started by mystang89, Jun 14, 2017.

  1. Jun 16, 2017
    mystang89

    mystang89 Overrun with beasties

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2012
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    51
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Location:
    Charlsetown IN
    Yep, that's the plan anyway. Kinda a tri fold reason anyway. Milk primary, cheese, butter if possible, and meat from the rams I don't keep. The future will tell how successful this plan is.
     
    lcertuche likes this.
  2. Jun 17, 2017 at 3:03 PM
    Baymule

    Baymule Herd Master

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Messages:
    5,192
    Likes Received:
    6,313
    Trophy Points:
    473
    Location:
    Southeast Texas
    Maybe because they originate from a desert country, where there isn't a lot of shade, is why they don't fully appreciate your efforts. I am sure they will acclimate to your care, shade and all, and will quickly adjust to being spoiled. :thumbsup still waiting on pictures........;)
     
    Simpleterrier likes this.
  3. Jun 17, 2017 at 9:33 PM
    Bossroo

    Bossroo True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    1,285
    Likes Received:
    522
    Trophy Points:
    221
    Also, sheep have 2" or more inches of insulation in the form of a wool coat untill they are shorn.
     
  4. Jun 18, 2017 at 6:53 AM
    mystang89

    mystang89 Overrun with beasties

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2012
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    51
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Location:
    Charlsetown IN
    Does that 2" of wool keep them cool by keeping the heart away or make them hot by trapping the heat inside?
     
  5. Jun 19, 2017 at 11:43 AM
    Sheepshape

    Sheepshape True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2012
    Messages:
    666
    Likes Received:
    512
    Trophy Points:
    223
    British sheep tend to get into the shade at the first sign of sun......there again it does come as a bit of a shock to them!

    You have hit the nail on the head. Sheep fleece is clever stuff.....a great insulator and preventer of overheating. Notice how sheep have a layer of unmelted snow on the top of them after a snowstorm.....the fleece insulates against the cold. When it is hot the fleece opens up, trapping even more air which is a poor conductor of heat. This layer of air entrapped in the fleece prevents excessive heat gain. (This info. came from a Government vet). Sheep fleeces from certain types of sheep (over here, the LLeyn sheep )have ideal fleeces for making duvets. Warm in winter, cool(ish) in summer....I have one....best material I know for the purpose.
     
    Baymule and Mike CHS like this.
  6. Jun 19, 2017 at 12:06 PM
    mystang89

    mystang89 Overrun with beasties

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2012
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    51
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Location:
    Charlsetown IN
    That's pretty awesome to know! But that being the case - why do people shear their sheep in the spring?
     
  7. Jun 19, 2017 at 1:01 PM
    misfitmorgan

    misfitmorgan True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2016
    Messages:
    1,523
    Likes Received:
    1,154
    Trophy Points:
    223
    Location:
    Northern Lower Michigan
    If your sheep were sheared i wouldnt worry about them laying out in the sun, if they get to hot they will move.

    Most people shear because the sheep breeds we have today dont naturally shed their fleece and have been bred for the most part to have longer, thicker fleece then "normal" merino is a good example of this. Chris and Shrek the sheep are a good example of why shearing is important to the highly engineered breeds.

    Awassi is a "natural" breed so you may not have to shear them but i think that would be dependent on if they are 100% awassi and where they came from, if they are the direct offspring of a few shipped from south west asia and lived say down south or in a very hot climate while here i dont think you should need to shear. If they have been bred in the US for several generations and came from a cold state like say montana they would probably require shearing.

    If they are laying in the sun and seem content no worries, if they are laying in the sun breathing fast and open mouth panting...look into shearing and or making them stay in shade during the hottest part of the day.
     
    lcertuche likes this.
  8. Jun 19, 2017 at 1:05 PM
    mystang89

    mystang89 Overrun with beasties

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2012
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    51
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Location:
    Charlsetown IN
    Thanks everyone.
     
  9. Jun 19, 2017 at 2:04 PM
    secuono

    secuono Herd Master

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2010
    Messages:
    3,264
    Likes Received:
    2,010
    Trophy Points:
    343
    Location:
    Virginia is for Pasture Farmers!
    At that high price point, I would be putting up several shade shelters. Feed them in the shelters until they get used to them.
    Put shade over the water tank, too.
    Or block the barn, move food & water under the tree line.

    My rams are smarter than my ewes, they quickly discovered the over hanging weeds & trees by the fence made a great spot to hang out. They hid so well I didn't even see them until they came out to graze.

    I just moved my ewes back to their original pasture and they are back to being stupid. It'll take a few weeks for enough of the ewes to use the shade shelters before the rest join them.

    I don't believe wool protects from the heat at all. Even my lambs get hot and pant on some bad days. All my sheep are visibly happier after shearing. The trapped air will eventually heat up.
     
  10. Jun 19, 2017 at 2:20 PM
    misfitmorgan

    misfitmorgan True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2016
    Messages:
    1,523
    Likes Received:
    1,154
    Trophy Points:
    223
    Location:
    Northern Lower Michigan
    As i mentioned i don't think wool does anything to help with heat on the engineered sheep we have but maybe it does on natural sheep :hu

    @Sheepshape do you have a link or something to that info on the fleece, it would be interesting to read.