Should we or shouldn't we?

parjackson

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We have the opportunity to buy a beautiful 2 yo horse who needs a new home. I know next to nothing about horses (except that they are beautiful, need training, and one of my 3 yo sons absolutely adores everything having to do with horses).

How much space does a horse need to be truly happy? We have a little over 2 acres of actual land, but we already have 3 nigerian dwarf goats, 23 chickens, 24 ducks, 2 pot belly pigs, and we're getting two sheep this evening. Would we even have enough room for it? What kind of fencing would we have to put up? Are they expensive to put up? How much time would we have to work with it each day to train it and care for it? Are horses expensive to maintain? We wouldn't even really be able to ride it anywhere around here because we live on a very busy roadway. (Every time I imagine a horse set-up, I see rolling hills with horses galloping freely and simply enjoying life.)

My husband keeps trying to talk me into it, but I refuse to bring home an animal if we can't care for it/give it what it needs to be happy and secure.

Thank you for your advice and help. I truly appreciate your voices of wisdom! :)
 

()relics

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A 2 year old horse may not be the place to start for a beginner...a horse that young probably has had limited training...maybe little training. Certainly it would require some sort of finish work just to be considered "broke"... a younger horse looks flashy but left untrained/finished will become the horse that you can't catch in the pasture let alone be able to ride...IMO find an older gelding that has been taken care of and is considered Finished...You would be able to saddle him up and ride him without the thought of day after day training before any "riding" takes place...Again JMO I haven't looked at the horse I'm just speaking about the average 2 year old....And get a Qhorse....again jmo
 

lilhill

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I agree. And the LAST thing you'd want to do is put a "green" rider on a "green" horse along a busy roadway. Disaster waiting to happen.
 

2468herdsrgr8

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OOOOh sorry to put a downer on this topic.....I have learned the hard way ....please reconsider .....for you and the horse's sake ....Last year I did it all wrong ...as a 40 year old something adult....and bought a big ole Belgian cross ..15yrs old .....thinking i could change her ....I then found out she was a driving horse first with some riding experience .owned my the mennonites ....went to a trainer with her and he said this horse is too powerful for me and I will not get any enjoyment out of her ,....long story short she's my hubby's horse now ...I was lucky...
Really Really do your homework way before you get one ...take people with you that know horses...get a vet check done first ....take your time ....It took me 7 months many many horses to find my guy and there are many horses out there ....Good Luck....
 

lupinfarm

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Ooohh 2468 you should have sent her over this way! ;) I am strong enough to handle a belgian cross.


Hehehe.. My old guy was a belgian cross and I used to ride a 16.3hh war horse style hanovarian mare who had some serious power under the hood, plus my percheron gelding we had.

Yikes, I think I am attracted to large and powerful horses. Earlier this year I tried out an 18hh Purebred Belgian mare LOL she was enormous.
 

lupinfarm

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I think... you need to start with an eeny weeny pony. Depending on that horses height, you could very well be putting your goats lives in jeopardy. My brothers bestfriends mom had a small herd of goats, and she had her horses in with them. One of her horses accidentally killed one of the goats when she kicked it.

A well trained shetland would be nice for your son to dote on and ride and you would have plenty of space for it too.
 

parjackson

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Thanks, everyone! I'm totally in agreement with your advice. I just wanted other people's opinions before presenting my concerns to my DH and officially shutting that door. The horse will be wonderful for someone who is experienced...it's just not going to be us!

How much does a well-trained pony cost in Ohio? I've been told that ponies can be really mean and bite a lot. Is that true, or is it only true of certian breeds or ages?

What you you look into getting if you were green around horses, (and city slickers until 6 months ago to boot)? I've thought about donkeys, mules, etc, but just didn't know what a good match would be. I have taken riding lessons (when I was studying in England, half a lifetime ago :/), but have probably forgotten most of what I ever knew.

Thanks again for comments and advice!
 

Bronco Hollow

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I think it is wise that you want to know that facts before jumping into horse ownership.

Buying a horse is the least expensive thing in horse ownership.

Green horses and green owners spell disaster.

You would be much wiser to look for an older horse thats been well broke... there are some very nice 19-20 year horses that would be much more suitable for your first experience with horse ownership. There is an exception to every rule, but you'll be bitting off more than you can chew with a young green horse.

However you decide, DO have the horse vet checked before you purchase, it is money well spent. If you know a person knowledgeable in horses [never the seller] take them along when you look.

You would have to search your area for the costs of fencing, as you would have to put up fencing that would be strong enough to hold a horse leaning on it. You'll also have to have some sort of run shed for protection in winter and for shade in summer. Those would be your first large expenditures.

Editied to say [took me forever to type this post!...] but a nice pony also in the upper ages would be excellent advise!
 

lupinfarm

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hmm not all ponies bite and kick a lot. TBH, horses can do that too. you'd probably want an older, perhaps, schoolmaster small pony. a dead quiet pony with no vices. they're not cheap, but you will save money in the long run.

i have a large pony and she is the WORST to handle, but i think with some time and training she'll get better.

bronco, we don't have a run-in shed for luna right now. she has trees for shade, and we put a water proof shell on her during the winter. we're going to put one up, but not all horses need run ins and i have never known a horse myself to actually like going in them.

my older boy never once stepped foot in the run in at our boarding barn.
 

2468herdsrgr8

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You know what lupin ...I was just outside and my horse was laying down inside the shelter right now ...because i watered down the gravel we laid two weeks ago and it was cooler ....they love the shelter ...I know because I am the poop picker upper ...hee heee heee!!! ......
 
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