Show Sheep Beginnings

BrahmerQueen

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For small equipment if you have a cricket machine or know someone that has one the cut out vinyl is nice.
Maybe a purple sharpie too
 

Ridgetop

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That is terrific progress! I would consider that ewe halter trained. Maybe not show trained, but definitely halter broke! The show training will come as Cassandra gets older.

As to the jumping when the rear legs are touched, that is normal. Again, constant practice with moving the legs back into position will teach her to stand still. If she is showing in a youth breeding show, another child will have to accompany her into the ring. If you ask an older experienced 4-H or FFA kid to help her they can set the rear legs while Cassandra holds the lambs head. 2 persons showing breeding sheep in halters is allowed and normal. If she shows in an "open" show (with adults) then you can go in the ring as the rear leg setter.

For now just have Cassandra lead her around on the halter. Occasionally stop and have her stand still (don't bother setting the legs since you just want the lamb to get used to standing still in the ring). If the lamb will take treats from Cassandra, she can give her a treat for standing still. Eventually you will have to work on the rear legs but there are tricks in setting a sheep in the ring that won't require setting the rear legs at all. If you have a well behaved lamb on halter you can often walk them into the proper position which means you only have to move one leg or set the front legs. These are tricks you will pickup in shows watching experienced people.

For now Cassandra is doing a great job with her lamb on halter! Dod 't forget that when the lamb goes into an actual show she might act freaky. Don't be the first sheep in the ring because a nervous lamb will often follow another lamb more quietly that it would enter a big open ring with lambs behind it. Once the judge pulls you out of the line up (to make a new line up of winners :fl) the judge will have pretty much decided on yor lamb so if the lamb jumps around with a small child holding the halter people are amused and very forgiving.

Remember that in breeding shows if the show is small, the classes may all be combined with all breeds showing together. The judge will judge each animal against its own breed standard. Sometimes the more popular breeds have their own class and the others are shown in an "All Other Breeds" (AOB) combined class.

Cassandra and you get a Blue Ribbon on training in my book!
 

Margali

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Cassandra got her membership letter to KHSI. She was so excited when I read it to her.

She is Cassandra B. Griffin Wood Ranch and Mocha is registered to Jennie B. Griffin Wood Ranch. So Cassandra should be good for shows that says sheep has to be registered in entrant's name?
 

Ridgetop

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In youth shows the animal must be registered in the youth exhibitor's name. It cannot share ownership with another person or a ranch name. In adult shows there is no such requirement for adult ownership to enter. To be safe, register all the sheep in Cassandra's name. Use either her youth membership in the KHSI or a family membership when registering the lambs. Show yourself as "agent" for Cassandra. You can sign all the paperwork, the animals can be entered and shown under her name in both youth and open shows, and you will have no problems with ownership requirements in youth shows. In open shows you can show the animals registered in her name as well. You don't want a glitch in registration of the animal to DQ her.

Here is a tip for paperwork - get a 3 ring school binder with a zip around closure for your sheep registration papers. Put each registration in a clear page protector. Use additional page protectors to hold her membership (and yours) information paperwork in KHSI. When entering shows, registering lambs, etc. make a copy of the paperwork and put it in the binder. That way when you arrive at the show and have to submit your registration paperwork at the livestock office for show check in, it is all in one place. The zipper closure keeps everything inside and keeps the paperwork clean in the dusty barns. Toss the binder into your tack box after check in.

About your tack box and equipment -
Another tip is using a large plastic tool box on wheels for a tack box. GEt the largest you can find since you will be amazed at all the stuff you need to put in it. Buy duplicates of all the equipment, washing, grooming, and showing paraphernalia you will be taking to shows in the tack box to cut down on having to rush around gathering all the stuff before each show. Check the contents and make sure you don't need to replace anything before and after shows. Restock after each show then store the box knowing it is ready to go. A folding metal tack rack (available through any livestock catalog) is handy for hanging over the pen to hold halters, etc. Mine has 2 hooks on top to hook it over a rail and f hooks on the bottom. The hooks swivel so the bar will pack flat in the tack box. Don't forget to pack Kaopectate for scours, and any other meds you will need BUT make sure they are legal and check any withdrawal dates for market animals. You might never need the stuff in your box but another exhibitor might. I always carried a length of stomach tubing and mineral oil with me. Never needed it for my kids' animals, but one little girl was shaving her goat and kept pouring grain into the bucket to keep it still and the goat got choke. Luckily another exhibitor was able to get the stuff out with my tubing or that poor child would have lost her goat. Don't forget folding camp chairs - there is never enough seating at shows. Pack a Magic Marker to mark all the stuff you forgot to mark at home! MARK YOUR NAME ON EVERYTHING IN GIANT LETTERS!

Get a padlock and have multiple keys cut.
If you can find a twin pack of padlocks keyed alike, that is even better. You will want to lock your tack box. With a padlock on your tack box you can shove your purse inside and not have to worry about it. If you have special show clothes, buy a good plastic garment bag to keep them clean. My kids had to wear white shirts and jeans - I bought duplicates so on hot sweaty days they could change into clean uniforms for showmanship where the kids are judged on both their appearance and the animal's grooming and presentation. The 4-H hats and ties went in the bag too and each child had their own bag. Exhibitor arm bands are held on by rubber bands - invest in your own pack because your child will drop theirs on the way back from picking up the armbands at ringside. And even if you get an extra some other mom will try to borrow it off you when their child loses theirs. LOL

Oh yes, and make sure to pack aspirin or Tylenol for yourself! Being a show mom is very stressful because your child will forget where her show equipment is, lose her show number, loan equipment to a friend but won't remember which one, and otherwise keep you on the run. I had a special extension cord, a dedicated Fair coffee pot with coffee, filters, disposable cups, Granola bars and Cup of Soup for emergencies, etc. My tack room was often the first stop for frazzled moms who hadn't had time to get their first cup in the am. LOL

You will eventually start keeping a list of items that are necessary for your family. No matter how intimidating it sounds, going to Fairs and stock shows with my kids was the best time of my life! :love:pop
 

Margali

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So I should take back this cute bag I impulse bought? :lol:
Screenshot_20220809-121740_Chrome~2.jpg
And get another kit like her dad's and some spraypaint?
Screenshot_20220809-121218_Chrome~2.jpg

Items must have divided storage. The single compartment giant box with corner wheels triggers horrible camping flashbacks. You know pawing thru entire container in the darn looking for the stinking batteries or matches...finding the sharp knives point first..
 

Margali

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@Ridgetop Okay, I did some digging into KHSI registery and I think I understand. The registration owner should be:
Alexander OR Cassandra OR Dominic B.

That way Alexander can be 2nd kid in breeding show. And Dominic can show Mocha as well. Correct?
 

Ridgetop

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Remember the size of the equipment you will be packing for the Fair/show. The purple bag would be okay for Cassandra's personal stuff (books, snacks, etc.,) - looks like a 5 gallon bucket with a purple liner? The 3 level box in the picture is like one we bought and thought we would like, but which turned out to be a nightmare on the dirt in the Fair/showground. Ours opened by depressing a latch on front and then it slid open into 3 compartments. Another one like that latched all 3 boxes together and they lifted off giving 3 separate boxes to find space for. We abandoned both those styles for shows for large box style tool boxes. With 4 children all showing one of every species we had to bring multiple boxes which you won't.

Remember that the larger tool boxes have trays that sit on ledges inside. Also, for certain small items (meds, not only for the sheep but for humans, spare rubber bands) you can use smaller latching clear plastic containers to hold them and pack that box into the large box. As long as the large box has fairly large wheels it will roll across the fairgrounds. Or, you can make a wheeled flat trolley to stack your tack box and equipment on, and use bungees to tie it down. Normally you will pull into the showgrounds and unpack your car by the pen area. Using a large flat tool box will also give you extra seating area or "tsble" space if you have to put it outside the sheep pen in the aisle. Eventually you may want to ask the Fair if you can pay for an extra pen to use as a tack pen. This is a luxury for short shows, but necessary for longer shows (Fairs) when you have to bring a week's worth of hay and grain along with cleaning tools, bedding (if allowed), and your own cooler for drinks and lunch. Food and drinks at shows (IF there is a snack bar) cost an arm and a leg so you always want to bring your own. It also will cut down on constant whining for "Fair Food" if the kids get used to not buying any snacks, drinks, etc. For our 4 children I used 2 loaves of bread for enough sandwiches each day. Also, apples, dry granola bars, and non-messy snacks. Remember you may be there for 12 hours. NO COLORED FRUIT DRINKS OR CHOCOLATE! They will spill on their show clothes just before entering the ring prompting maternal meltdown.
:barnie

Have been trying for 45 minutes to post pix of good style tack box but no luck! :somad Going to post this then try another route to find the pix to send.
 

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