Show Sheep Beginnings

Ridgetop

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Don't worry about Mocha vocalizing in the ring. A lot of sheep bawl in the show ring since they are being taken away from flock and pen mates.

Cassandra did a great job in showmanship for both for both her and Mocha's first time in a show ring. She walked a little fast, BUT NOT HER FAULT since little boy behind her was crowding up on her. There are tricks to avoid this which she will learn. Holding Mocha's head still without hanging onto her by the neck will be easier if she trains Mocha to stand quietly in her halter whie being held on lead. If Mocha eats treats (animal crackers) Cassandra can carry a handful (or more) into the ring in a pocket or treat pouch and feed her a bit of cookie every so often t keep her standing still. If you make Cassandra a treat bag to hang around her waist she can carry the cookies in that. If Cassandra wears it on her waist on the right side (the side next to Mocha in the ring) Mocha might follow the scent of the cookies. Be sure to practice this at home since you don't want Mocha knocking into Cassandra to try to get at the crackers as Cassandra is walking around the ring. LOL

How old is Cassandra again? I think for her first time ever showing a sheep, she did very well indeed. Mocha looked very well groomed, and Cassandra looked like she was having a good time. Mocha did not escape from Cassandra, try to run around the ring yanking Cassandra over, rear up and try to jump away, throw herself to the ground and refuse to move, or any of the other crazy things that can happen when showing sheep. Not to mention my favorites, peeing on it's the owner or worse the judge!

As she works with Mocha the ewe will get calmer and Cassandra will gain confidence in handling. She does not have to "Push" the sheep per se. Instead, she can learn to walk her lamb/ewe into position with the rear legs placed properly. Then she only has to move the front legs into position. At the moment Cassandra is small to be able to handle and stack both ends of the sheep by herself, so the above method might work well for her. In a breeding class she can have another person help her move the back legs, but since she is handling on her own, moving the sheep into a stance where the rear legs are ok then placing the front legs correctly by hand while the sheep stands still will be easier for her. The "Push" refers to placing a gentle backward push against the sheep to make it brace its muscle against the pushing of the handler. This makes the sheep lean into the pose. This will only work if the sheep has been taught to stand absolutely still otherwise the sheep will step backwards and ruin the pose. One way to teach the sheep or lamb to lean into the stance is to practice stacking it on a straw bale or a platform at least 12" tall. If the sheep moves around or backs up it falls off the platform. Sheep don't like that so the sheep will learn to freeze into position when being stacked.

If you can obtain an old mirror wardrobe door (the full height sliding kind) you can prop it against a wall where Cassandra practices her showmanship. That way the reflection will show her what the sheep looks like as the judge will see it and then she can see what the proper showmanship stance looks like from her perspective next to the sheep. Remember the person handling the sheep can't see it from the side as the judge looks at it. When you are stacking any animal, you have to know what it looks like based on the way you see the animal which is from your standing position looking down at it. You can probably find a used mirror door at Habitat for Humanity.

Cassandra did great and I loved her unicorn costume! :love
 

Show Sebright

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@Show Sebright @ShowsheenQueen @Ridgetop Any tips to get Mocha to quiet down? She handled well except for when tail costume broke. She just talked the WHOLE TIME.
Looks great. Try to keep the head up and the neck straight when you set her up. Keep practicing walking her. Also if the lamb isn’t walking then try too put your hand where the throat and the head meet. I jammed my hand into that little spot and I tap on the back of his head/neck. That got him to start walking. Maybe slap the side of the lamb as you walk. I do that with my lamb too.
 

Ridgetop

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At only 6 years old Cassandra did beautifully! I have seen teenagers not able to control their lambs as well as she did. How long will she be able to show Mocha in your shows? At what age will the ewe need to stop showing? Most breed sheep shows only have classes up to yearling.
 

Margali

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At only 6 years old Cassandra did beautifully! I have seen teenagers not able to control their lambs as well as she did. How long will she be able to show Mocha in your shows? At what age will the ewe need to stop showing? Most breed sheep shows only have classes up to yearling.
For showmanship, Mocha can be used as long as we want. Regarding actual showing classes, the issue will be breed not age. The 2023 San Antonio lists Lamb, 2Teeth, and Aged classes for registered breeding sheep. The rules names breeds with Dorper and White Dorper being only hair sheep listed.
 

Show Sebright

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For showmanship, Mocha can be used as long as we want. Regarding actual showing classes, the issue will be breed not age. The 2023 San Antonio lists Lamb, 2Teeth, and Aged classes for registered breeding sheep. The rules names breeds with Dorper and White Dorper being only hair sheep listed.
Most shows will easily add your sheep, just ask.
 
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