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Small horse, big attitude.

Discussion in 'Behaviors & Handling Techniques - Horses, Mules, a' started by MaggieSims, Sep 8, 2016.

  1. Oct 15, 2016
    MaggieSims

    MaggieSims Overrun with beasties

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    best way to introduce these boys to a large horse?
     
  2. Oct 17, 2016
    Kusanar

    Kusanar Ridin' The Range

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    When I put my mini out with the big guys, he ended up running for his life, half the big guys were scared of him, the other half weren't sure what he was and tried to stomp him... If i had to do it again, I would put him next to them for a while with a fence in between, then remove the lower boards so he can walk under but the big guys can't, and let him go out with them, if they try to kill him, he has an escape route to somewhere they can't get him.
     
  3. Oct 18, 2016
    MaggieSims

    MaggieSims Overrun with beasties

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    It went quite the opposite, these little boys turned into pitbulls going after the mare. both turned wild, nostrils flared, angrily stomping trying to bite and kick her. The mare just turned around and took a couple kicks, but i took her out right away to avoid actual hoof to face contact. fence to fence is not an option either as they try to get her through the fence. i had to move her to a further pen, they can still see her and i walk her around and them around her, but they still hate her. its been 4 days, and they still have the same level of aggression towards her. The nicer one of the two is actually the meaner more aggressive in this situation. Sill fine when i handle them, but there is just something about this mare neither of the two fluffy poines do not like.
     
    TAH likes this.
  4. Oct 18, 2016
    Bunnylady

    Bunnylady True BYH Addict

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    In this case, they are the homeboys. This is their territory, and they want to be sure she understands that she's an interloper. Every new horse starts at the bottom of the totem pole, and has to work their way up. Your more subordinate pony is feeling a bit smug about being able to dish it for once . . . .

    In my experience, it takes about 2 weeks for the 'new' to wear off. When I worked at a boarding stable, I got used to the idea that new horses are crazy; they are all going to try things to see what they can get away with. Once they had it in their heads that I was in charge, I managed to get along fine with almost all of them. I saw this out in the pasture, too - the new horses got grief from almost everyone, unless they proved too "bad" to be beaten down. There was one gelding that I particularly remember; a bulldog-type Quarter Horse named Moose. The first time he was turned out in the geldings pasture, he was the first one out. I turned a few other geldings out, they all had to go over, sniff noses, squeal, etc; though there was some horseplay, nobody actually made contact. Then I turned the mares out in the adjacent pasture. One of them was in season, and she went over to the fence near where Moose was. She was peeing, and flirting, and doing the things that mares do. Curly, the most dominant gelding in the pasture, couldn't stand it - he was one of those "studly" geldings, and as far as he was concerned, all the mares on the place were his, never mind that they weren't in the pasture with him. He came flying across the pasture and landed right in the middle of Moose. There was some squealing, a few kicks and bites, and within about 30 seconds, Curly retreated, bleeding in about a dozen places. I caught up with him in the place he'd gone to regroup, and checked to make sure there weren't any serious injuries. There weren't, and I asked him, "well, did you learn anything?":gig
     
    frustratedearthmother likes this.