Spotty lambs 2020

Roving Jacobs

Seeing Spots
Joined
Jul 27, 2012
Messages
523
Reaction score
776
Points
223
Location
NE OH
I know this thread is kinda old, but I'm thinking about getting some Jacob sheep and was just drooling over your babies. So cute!

Jacobs are great! I'm always happy to answer spotty sheep questions if you have any. The breed club is also super friendly and supportive.

Here's all the lambs that I had left at 6 months. All my ewe lambs sold except the 4 I'm keeping back and I've got a bunch of ram lambs some of which are leaving soon and some are being grown out for either spring meat sales or to be sold as yearlings with nice big horns.

Holly, ewe lamb, staying


Apollo, ram lamb, had a home lined up but there was some drama and now he's available again


Rosette, ewe lamb, sold


Pacific, lilac ram lamb, keeping


Carolina, ewe lamb, sold


Jester, ram lamb, growing out


Duchess, ewe lamb, sold


Kent, ram lamb, growing out


Spartan, ram lamb, growing out


Admiral, ram lamb, sold


Keepsake, ewe lamb, keeping


Rival, ram lamb, sold


Monarch, ram lamb, growing out hopefully finds a breeding home because he's really nice


Rubens, ram lamb, growing out


Dulcet, ewe lamb, keeping


Irish, ram lamb going to his new home with a starter flock of adult ewes this weekend


Jubilee, ewe lamb, keeping


Also I added yet another spotty creature to the farm, an australian cattle dog puppy! I got her at 4.5 months and she's 6 months now. We went to a herding trainer for some foundation tips but she's got a lot of maturing to do before she can actually help out. Her name is Scout and she came all the way from Oklahoma.


Breeding starts on the 12th for next year's batch of lambs. I've got a few people who want starter flocks next year so hopefully I have a lot of nice girls!
 

Kusanar

Loving the herd life
Joined
Jun 9, 2016
Messages
275
Reaction score
399
Points
132
Location
Roanoke Area, Virginia
So pretty, the pup isn't bad either ;)

I'm thinking about getting 2-3 ewe lambs and then a year later getting a ram so I can get used to sheep before I have a ram to deal with. I'm not worried about hormonal males, I have a stallion and have dealt with bulls, but I figure when getting into a new species it would be easier to start with the girls before I have to deal with those hormones as well.

I need to get cross fencing done and get a 2nd shelter up before I bring the sheep home though so if I need to separate them from the horses I have that option as well as letting them meet over a fence line. I would probably pen the sheep up into a smaller area without the horses for lambing time as well so the babies don't get hurt by accident so I want there to be a 2nd shelter that they could be in for that.

Do they have any issues with woven wire fencing and the horns?
 

Roving Jacobs

Seeing Spots
Joined
Jul 27, 2012
Messages
523
Reaction score
776
Points
223
Location
NE OH
My perimeter fence is woven wire and I've never had a jacob get caught in it (now the goats on the other hand...). I divide it up with 4 strand electric "smart fence" for pasture rotation and it works really well.

I'd start with 3 so if something happens to one you still have a pair to keep each other company. Starting with ewes and getting the ram when they're yearlings is a good idea. Jacob rams are generally pretty respectful because no one wants to put up with a mean ram with giant horns but it still takes some getting used to.

If things are some semblance of normal next year the jacob sheep annual meeting and show will be in NC and we have a big show there in October too. You should meet some spotty sheep and breeders in person and see how you like them! They're so much fun, definitely my favorite breed.
 

Kusanar

Loving the herd life
Joined
Jun 9, 2016
Messages
275
Reaction score
399
Points
132
Location
Roanoke Area, Virginia
My perimeter fence is woven wire and I've never had a jacob get caught in it (now the goats on the other hand...). I divide it up with 4 strand electric "smart fence" for pasture rotation and it works really well.

I'd start with 3 so if something happens to one you still have a pair to keep each other company. Starting with ewes and getting the ram when they're yearlings is a good idea. Jacob rams are generally pretty respectful because no one wants to put up with a mean ram with giant horns but it still takes some getting used to.

If things are some semblance of normal next year the jacob sheep annual meeting and show will be in NC and we have a big show there in October too. You should meet some spotty sheep and breeders in person and see how you like them! They're so much fun, definitely my favorite breed.
There are a few somewhat near me in virginia. One in Lexington and one in floyd.

They will all be halter broken and trained to be respectful. I'm not looking for pets per say, but I will not have an animal I cant catch and move around if I need to. I was watching a youtube video of a lady that has wool sheep and has to use 2 sheep dogs to even touch any of her sheep, I was just cringing.
 

Baymule

Herd Master
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
20,754
Reaction score
51,998
Points
823
Location
Northeast Texas
@Kusanar I keep my sheep and horses separated. Different barns, different pastures. I will rotate the sheep and horses through the pastures, but not together. It's not worth risking the injury to any of them.
 

Baymule

Herd Master
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
20,754
Reaction score
51,998
Points
823
Location
Northeast Texas
As always i love looking at your spotty sheep, they are so nice. Congrats on the red heeler, they do make great cattle dogs.
 

Kusanar

Loving the herd life
Joined
Jun 9, 2016
Messages
275
Reaction score
399
Points
132
Location
Roanoke Area, Virginia
@Kusanar I keep my sheep and horses separated. Different barns, different pastures. I will rotate the sheep and horses through the pastures, but not together. It's not worth risking the injury to any of them.
I dont think there should be too much of a problem. I have a 32" mini in with standard horses and he kicks them in the heads when they try to push him around, so they are used to small wooly beasts and how they get hurt when they are bossy. Unless I got a ram that tried to gore a horse I really dont think there would be a problem. But, of course I would introduce very carefully.

Edit to add: and even with careful introduction I will make sure I am able to separate if it doesnt work out having them together
 

Baymule

Herd Master
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
20,754
Reaction score
51,998
Points
823
Location
Northeast Texas
I have a playful gelding that would probably think I just gifted him with new toys. But even so, I still wouldn't mix them. If it works out for you, it works.
 

Kusanar

Loving the herd life
Joined
Jun 9, 2016
Messages
275
Reaction score
399
Points
132
Location
Roanoke Area, Virginia
I have a playful gelding that would probably think I just gifted him with new toys. But even so, I still wouldn't mix them. If it works out for you, it works.
I figure if anyone gets hurt it would probably be my stallion. He thinks he's big man (even though he gets bossed around by 2 geldings, one of which is a mini) and doesnt always know when enough is enough, so he might get poked a few times before he realizes the funny smelling mini horses are pointy. I would probably tennis ball the sheep at least on the top goaty horns for a while too so they can express their displeasure without killing anything.
 
Top