Tender Hooves?

MaggieSims

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So if you've seen previous posts of mine, i have recently gotten an new mare, oh about a month or more by now. Her feet were long and tender when i got her, but where she was fed primarily had a concrete pad, so i was thinking her feet should feel better after a trim, and being on real ground. She has made no improvement. The farrier didn't notice anything looking like bruising or abscess, we had talked about her tenderness.

My question is, how long should I let her 'come out of it'. I assume long hoofs holding and packing then standing on concrete most of the day would take a while to work out, but I'm getting anxious. How long should I wait? It seems to affect her fronts more, she is always seen holding up either front hoof.
 

Bunnylady

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Depending on just how severe this was, it may take several trim cycles to get her feet relatively normal. On the other hand, the long feet may be caused by the soreness rather than the other way 'round (a horse that is sore may move and stand in a way that causes its feet to wear oddly). Has your vet been consulted on this one?
 

MaggieSims

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Depending on just how severe this was, it may take several trim cycles to get her feet relatively normal. On the other hand, the long feet may be caused by the soreness rather than the other way 'round (a horse that is sore may move and stand in a way that causes its feet to wear oddly). Has your vet been consulted on this one?
yeah, i've only trimmed once, and i thought she still looks a little flared out. I didn't know which to consult first, vet or farrier, although the farrier thought her feet looked decent other than long. No big chips or anything, just long. I'll try to get a video today of her just hanging out, she lifts her feet often, so i'll be able to capture it.
 

Mini Horses

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I'd get the vet to check for any navicular issues. He may need to Xray. Do you know if she ever foundered in the past? Always possibility of bone spurs, etc., especially if she was ridden hard a lot in the sport events. At least you would know if there was something going on beyond hoof growth. May make for a faster recovery.

I've been wondering how you two were doing -- feet and bonding, too.
 

MaggieSims

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@Mini Horses

actually, we have been doing good on the ground, she has learned her place, very sweet and mindful UNTIL saddling. she just doesn't want it. but i won, it took 45 minutes the last time. but she is constantly picking up a front hoof then turning to me, like she's saying ouch. so i haven't done more than 5 minutes of riding in soft grass to avoid making anything worse, but i felt like i needed to get the task done and end the session on my terms, after she had done something good. it was a small victory, but a necessary one. and another thing, she hates the bridling, and the bit. so last time, i tried just halter and she rode fine. good with stopping. she seems to stress the whole tacking up and the impending bridle and bit, but relaxed after we skipped the bit and went all halter.
 

Mini Horses

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I always loved a bosal. Some horses just don't work with a bit. Last arab I sold had always been bosal ridden. He threw 3 people when they used bidles with a bit....soft mouth. Guess those English riders didn't think we western ones knew anything. :) He was used to bareback & bosal. I couldn't afford a saddle then but, when I did get one he took to it just fine with easy introduction. Young & green but a great animal!
Trust between handler and horse goes so very far.

Hope you get to the bottom of the foot issue soon -- it will be so nice for both of you! Keep up the good work with her.

This weekend I had the opportunity to be given a beauty of a mare -- 13 y/o, well broke, papered -- but, I knew I just did not have the time to devote to her and be fair to both of us. WHAT a temptation!! Hey, I can go ride her anyway - until she is re-homed. Definitely hard to pass up but, I know I am right.
 

farmerjan

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I also think you need a vet to check for navicular. and maybe it is just more time off the concrete, but I think a vet that is well versed in horses would be a good idea to diagnose the problem.
 

MaggieSims

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ok, is this something a vet can do on site, or do I need to bring her in somewhere? i have no trailer >.<
 

farmerjan

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Call the vet and ask. Phone calls are still free last time I knew. It's been so long since my friend in ct had her old horse diagnosed with navicular that I don't remember. If the vet is coming out for any reason anytime soon, get them to look and then tell you what/where to go from there.
 

Mini Horses

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Modern equipment often gives them the ability to do X-rays on site. A good equine vet will be able to do this for you. It would be worth the expense to be able to really know what the issue may be. And treatment, if needed, would sure be good for both of you.

You may need meds or special shoeing, or just time...or all. A riding horse that can't be ridden isn't as much fun. Plus, I can feel you really want the best for her.
 
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