Thin yearling

secuono

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One of the 3 new ewes I got has been weak since purchase. She's a yearling.
Thin, a bit slow, good red eye color, was dewormed with Valbazen and Cydectin roughly 3wks apart, last dose 3wks ago.
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Just dosed her with levamisole today & moved her to her own paddock along with hay and pellets. She ate some, but not all the pellets. Its regular sheep feed, nothing special or medicated.

That lamb in the group had to be dewormed for megineal worm twice, now okay. The mature ewe is totally fine.

Before I get the sheep vet out to poke around at her, what do you guys think could be her problem?
 

mysunwolf

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Couple things. Could be a parasite that won't cause anemia and won't show up on fecals. Get a fecal done anyway. Then if her temp is normal, she's eating, clean nose, good breathing, I personally would deworm w/Cydectin and Valbazen at the same time. Worst case scenario it could be Johnes or OPP but those don't usually show up until 18 months. Best case scenario is it's just nutritional and she'll recover with some extra protein. Check her teeth for sure.
 

Sheepshape

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Secuono...she doesn't look too bad to me...but I know that pics. can be SO deceptive. hopefully, she's just a slender young lady who will fill out with time.

Can we have a some of your rain, please? We've lacked proper rain much of this summer and have poor pasture and no winter fodder.

Really wet conditions (as we usually have here) predispose to liver fluke as well as worms. The intermediate host for liver fluke is a small snail, hence the risk from wet pasture. Check whether fluke is endemic in the region which your new ewe came from and treat her if it is. Sudden death can occur with liver fluke....though often the animals who die appear well nourished and healthy, not thin.

Good Luck.
 

secuono

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Yeah, it's hard to get it in a picture, but hip points, shoulder and spine are all raised, no meat on her. Even laying down, you can see that in person.

Valbazen treats adults, but not the younger fluke. I can't find Triclabendazole in USA.


Please take our rain, I'm very sick of it!
Raining again now.

I can hardly keep up with mowing because of all the rain. =/
 

Sheepshape

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Secuno....I'm sorry to hear of all the problems that are trying to overwhelm you right now.

Copper toxicity is a real problem in sheep. What about having goats (or more goats if you already have some) who are much more copper-tolerant.

Have you had your water analysed? Seems to be the way to go. We have a dual water supple here..... a long standing source from a spring and a recently installed bore hole after last summer's exceptional drought. We had our water analysed from both sources and they are different but both safe and appropriate to drink for us and the animals.Excess minerals can usually be filtered out for your own use, along with a UV light to kill bacteria. If you can store rainwater for the animals to drink for at least part of the time, this should also help.

The lung size of any animal can look disproportionately small after death if the air has come out of the lungs. Conversely the lungs can seem to stuff the thorax if the air is still in them.Sheep generally seem to have small lungs for their body size.

I know nothing about fescue fungus poisoning. We have fescue grasses over here, but they don't seem to cause much problem to us normally. Grasses which tolerate wet are the predominant ones in my area. Hopefully reseading your pastures will sort this out.

I wish you luck. Land and animal care is a continual battle, though, isn't it?
 

Sheepshape

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Like mysunwolf says OPP and Johne's are diseases of older ewes.....so, thankfully unlikely to be either of these.

Could she have been ill for a while before you got her and hasn't fully recovered yet? Did she have a lamb which reduced her condition? Is liver fluke prevalent in your area? Does she have scours?

If there's absolutely nothing else to go on, I'd give her Selenium/cobalt/B12 drench or a multivitamin shot and make sure she has food supplements....doesn't need to be anything fancy.

Good Luck.
 

secuono

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Hard to see, but she's too thin.
Moved another yearling ewe in with her, different one than before. She also needs to recover from....something. Runny poo, touch thin, but otherwise normal.
Stupid amount of rain falling again, I hate excessive rain....

20180801_164332.jpg
 

Ridgetop

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California needs rain too, but too much of anything can be a bad thing. Here in So Cal we are hardly bothered by worms since the ground is so dry that they can't live. BUT when we have a bad rain year (El Nino) or tropical storms from Mexico, we flood because the ground is so hard the rain runs off before it can soak in. Then stuff that was dormant for years comes alive and catches us unaware. Dogs all got Giardiasis one rainy year - didn't know what it was, never heard of it before. Stools like water, lost weight, now I know what it is and how to stop it.

Hope you have a respite from the rain soon, and your pastures can dry out. :cool: Hopefully, now the scours are under control and she has been wormed she will put some weight on. :hugs
 
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