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Thinking about horses

Discussion in 'Feeding Time - Horses, Mules and Donkeys' started by mystang89, Oct 5, 2019.

  1. Oct 5, 2019
    mystang89

    mystang89 True BYH Addict

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    So my wife and I rode a horse for the first time today and got us thinking about getting a horse. Some questions pop up though. If they have 7acres to feed from and are kept in the pasture all the time would they need free access to hay during the summer? What about during the winter and spring? How fast will one horse go through a round bale of hay? How many sq bales will I go through a year? Do you give grain or do they need grain or minerals?
     
  2. Oct 6, 2019
    Baymule

    Baymule Herd Master

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    Yes they need grain. If you have fantastic grass, it might not need grain in the summer. They need hay all winter. I have 4, they go through a round bale in 2-3 weeks. If you have just one horse, keep it in the barn or under cover, if it gets rained/snowed on, it will mold and rot before the horse eats it. Square bales would probably make more sense if you don’t have room to keep a round bale under cover.

    Get a WELL TRAINED horse, an older horse would be a good teacher for you and kids.
     
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  3. Oct 6, 2019
    promiseacres

    promiseacres Herd Master

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    Grain... it depends on the horse, some only need a vitamin/mineral balancer with their hay. Some need grain year around. Depends on hay or pasture quality and the horse. We are feeding 5 riding horses currently. Our 1100# 15 year old qh mare gets 2# of senior feed and about 25# of grass hay. The two pony sized boys, one an 11 year 1200# old hafinger, one a 20+year old quarter pony about 1100# each get 20# of grass hay and 1/2 # of a low starch feed. The 900# 20 year old and 1000# 19 year old Morgans each get 30# of hay and 3# of senior feed. Per day, I feed hay twice a day and the grain once. None are worked hard, only 2 of the 5 are ridden regularly. We have a dry lot system as some horses can founder easily when the grass grows fast, spring and fall. The haflinger is one of these and only gets limited pasture.
    I suggest finding a lesson barn and take lessons prior getting your own. You need to learn horse behavior and best done with quiet well trained horses that are handled often. Even well trained horses may need a tune up if they do not get ridden or worked regularly.
     
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  4. Oct 6, 2019
    mystang89

    mystang89 True BYH Addict

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    Thank you all.

    We have a friend who raises horses so we've asked many questions from her and she has offered to allow us to come over and see how and what she does which we will be taking her to on.

    I would LOVE a Morgan horse as that is exactly what I was wanting.

    As far as dry lot is concerned, that's an issue which needs addressing. We don't have anywhere for that however I believe there is a mask to can put on the house which prevents them from grazing when it's on. That might be an option.

    For feed, I read that horses need about 1.5 - 2% of their body weight which seems that's about how much @promiseacres is giving. Is it difficult to maintain weight? Is that something which you have to monitor constantly by measuring for weight?

    I'll probably make something for the horse to eat out of under the lean to.

    Hopefully by next year well be able to add a couple of acres to our grazing or at least the amount of hay we cut.

    I'd say whatever horse we get will probably be ridden.... Quite frequently. How do you know what to much is? Does the horse give signals saying that he needs a break?
     
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  5. Oct 6, 2019
    Bunnylady

    Bunnylady Herd Master

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    Yeah - he goes lame. :(

    Seriously, one of the saddest things I've ever seen was a Quarter Horse mare that had been a lesson pony, and got sold to a family with 3 adoring but totally clueless kids. They took turns riding that horse every day after school, including doing things like pole bending and barrels. Then the dad lost his job, and they cut all kinds of corners trying to save on feed. When the person they had bought the horse from took pity on them all and bought the horse back, she was a wreck. It took us a few months to get her weight back up, but she never was really sound again .
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2019
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  6. Oct 6, 2019
    mystang89

    mystang89 True BYH Addict

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    Thank you for the reply. How do I know the horse is getting to that point? How long can a horse be ridden every day?
     
  7. Oct 6, 2019
    Baymule

    Baymule Herd Master

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    A horse gets hot, sweaty, breathing hard, tired, JUST LIKE YOU! You are a very compassionate man, I don't think there will be a problem, you will know when it is time to ease up.

    A horse needs a roof, sides, somewhere to get out of bad weather and wind. It can be a three sided shelter. If you don't have a dry lot, attach a pen to the shelter and you will have a dry lot in no time. A lot and shelter is a good idea, sometimes you want to pen up a horse and not chase it all over 7 acres. How DO they KNOW the vet or farrier is coming? LOL
     
  8. Oct 6, 2019
    promiseacres

    promiseacres Herd Master

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    JMHO Don't buy a horse because of breed or color... after our experiences with the Morgans I wouldn't ever have another... I am sure there are good ones out there but :idunno I definitely don't reccommend one for a beginner. The two we have take a firm confident hand or they will take advantage of a person. Duke my husband's morgan has been know to strike and bite to dominate people. Not with us fortunately... though he likes my 7 year old and follows her all over. But she is training her pony.
    As for maintenence of a horse it depends on the individual. Some are easy keepers, some are not. Just like people. A horse will need hoof trims every 6 to 8 weeks, annual vaccines and teeth checked 1 to 2 times a year. Many horses don't need a dry lot but... like @Baymule says they make catching easier.
     
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  9. Oct 6, 2019
    Baymule

    Baymule Herd Master

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    Let me recommend a Tennessee Walker. Smooth gait, calm disposition, can be spirited, but an older, been there-done that horse may be just what you want.

    Having said that, my 32 year old Tennessee Walker mare, retired, if I saddled her up and rode her in the morning, she would be snorting and hunting something to spook at. :lol:
     
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  10. Oct 6, 2019
    Baymule

    Baymule Herd Master

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