1. BYH Official Poll: What are the things that you should consider before buying herds?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  2. A Thief has been caught!!! - Featured Thread
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Dismiss Notice
  4. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)
    Dismiss Notice

Thoughts on using PT for fence posts (NG dairy goats)?

Discussion in 'Organic Husbandry - Goats' started by seachick, May 16, 2019.

  1. May 16, 2019
    seachick

    seachick Chillin' with the herd

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    26
    We try to do everything on our small suburban homestead as chemical-free as possible. We don't have pressure treated wood anywhere except for the floor joists in buildings. However, we're building a small pasture (~1,000 sf) for the two new Nigerian Dwarf dairy goats we are getting, and I'd really like it to last longer than the 9 or so years we get out of local Eastern white cedar posts. (We live in Maine so basically all I have to choose from is local white cedar or PT or hemlock.)

    Our soil is heavy clay and doesn't drain well. We definitely want wooden posts with knotted wire fencing, since we want our neighbors to be happy with our "cute" goat set-up and not complain ;)

    The fence posts are on the outside of the fencing, so less likely to get chewed. What do you think? Is this an acceptable trade-off for longevity? I'd love to hear your thoughts.
     
    CntryBoy777 likes this.
  2. May 16, 2019
    greybeard

    greybeard Herd Master

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2011
    Messages:
    5,722
    Likes Received:
    9,862
    Trophy Points:
    533
    Location:
    East Texas
    Steel, if you are adamant about "chemical free".
    I use PT of some kind everywhere, or I wouldn't have a fence or outbuilding left standing. Some of my corner posts, I put in the ground in 1964-1965. Others are more recent..80s thru present.
    I don't mind doing work, but I really really REALLY hate doing the same thing twice.
     
    CntryBoy777, Hipshot and Ridgetop like this.
  3. May 16, 2019
    seachick

    seachick Chillin' with the herd

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    26
    Thanks, Greybeard. I've just been reading lots of your excellent fencing tips!
    I realize steel is the most chemical free, but it also tends to be more agricultural looking and less "cute". Since having goats in my neighborhood is kind of a gray-area zoning-wise, I'm trying to make sure the whole set-up is as aesthetically pleasing as possible for happy neighbors. I do use T-posts in the wooded area of our lot, but this is in a very visible part of the lawn. I'm leaning towards PT right now even though it makes me a little uneasy.
     
    CntryBoy777 likes this.
  4. May 16, 2019
    OneFineAcre

    OneFineAcre Herd Master

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2012
    Messages:
    8,896
    Likes Received:
    9,513
    Trophy Points:
    573
    Location:
    Zebulon, NC
    Our fences are from PT wood. Our fence is on the outside and we've never had an issue with goats chewing the fence posts.
     
    B&B Happy goats likes this.
  5. May 16, 2019
    greybeard

    greybeard Herd Master

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2011
    Messages:
    5,722
    Likes Received:
    9,862
    Trophy Points:
    533
    Location:
    East Texas
    Well, I don't do "cute" in any sense of the word so I can't address that. There are some very nice (ornate/ornamental) steel fencing products that would do the trick but may be cost prohibitive.

    Today's PT is deemed "environmentally friendly" as it uses either copper oxide (azole) or ACQ..alkaline copper quat. The days of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) are long past and is not available any more, as the FDA banned sale of any product containing that to residential users..

    I know lots of people that use modern PT for raised beds raising their own vegetables.

    Some of the new non-copper "green" alternatives are showing to be less sustainable than the manufacturer stated.they are rotting in the ground.
    https://www.engineering.com/Designe...mber-reported-to-be-rotting-unexpectedly.aspx
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2019
    CntryBoy777 likes this.
  6. May 16, 2019
    seachick

    seachick Chillin' with the herd

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    26
    Thanks! That's what I was hoping to hear...
     
  7. May 16, 2019
    seachick

    seachick Chillin' with the herd

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    26
    I'm sure I wouldn't do "cute" if I had a real farm ;) I did look at those decorative steel ones, but, yeah, waaaay too expensive. Thanks!
     
  8. May 16, 2019
    Baymule

    Baymule Herd Master

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Messages:
    13,145
    Likes Received:
    27,431
    Trophy Points:
    763
    Location:
    Northeast Texas
    I have chemical issues to the point where I can't walk down the soap aisle at the store. Forget about getting near to fertilizers and ag chemicals. I live as chemical free as possible. BUT there are places for chemicals and fence posts are one of them. We used treated posts for the back yard fence and corners, H braces and neither the horses or sheep have chewed them. I have not reacted to them either. Now if I was to go chew on one, I would probably get a reaction, but really, who's that stupid?

    Go ahead and use the treated posts, it is hard work and as GB said, you only want to do it one time.
     
    CntryBoy777 and B&B Happy goats like this.
  9. May 16, 2019
    seachick

    seachick Chillin' with the herd

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    26
    Thank you! You guys have convinced me :)
     
  10. May 20, 2019 at 12:44 AM
    goatboy1973

    goatboy1973 True BYH Addict Golden Herd Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2013
    Messages:
    769
    Likes Received:
    432
    Trophy Points:
    233
    Location:
    Corryton, Tennessee
    We use PT fence posts for corner posts as well as the old creosote posts. Our local utility company rolls a few broken telephone poles off in our front pasture for us so that we can repurpose them. We have used them for everything from pole sheds for equipment storage to a pole barn for working our goats and housing our chutes and head gate so we are out of the elements to using the posts for fencing. The pressure treated posts/ poles are treated with either arsenic compounds or salts. The old school poles were treated with creosote and PCB's which caused the egg shells of bald eagles to be thin and when the mother eagle sat on her eggs, they would break. This is what caused the numbers to dwindle in the 70's and 80's. You should always use eye protection and a dust mask when cutting or trimming these types of poles to prevent these potentially toxic dust particles from being inhaled. They do make excellent corner and brace posts though. As an alternative, we use black locust posts which are hard as concrete and last for decades as much as possible. There's fence posts older than me (45 years old) that are still standing and have out lived the original wire that was attached to them.
     
    Baymule likes this.