Too early to kid?

docteurmccoy

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So, my mistake, I should have researched more. Here's my concern, I have two nubian/boer cross goats, one is a buck and other is a doe. The doe is only 8 months old and she's almost certainly been bred by the buck probably a month ago. This was the plan, I thought it would be fine as she'll be around a year when she kids, until I started hearing stories about how most people wait until the doe is like two at least. Now I'm scared. I doubt I'll be able to afford a vet to do a C-section when it comes time, I mean I can't imagine how much that'll run, if I can even find a vet that will do that around here. I understand this is my fault and I take the blame fully if anything happens. I'm assuming I may have to assist with the birth, which is fine and I will prepare for that, but if she isn't able to birth at all that's obviously going to be an issue. I don't want to lose her or the kids obviously.

My question is, are the horror stories true or can does give birth at a year?


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Baymule

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I have sheep, not goats. I have to separate the ram lambs at 2 months old because the frisky little devils will breed at only 2 months old. I have a set of twins right now and the ram lamb was humping his sister and whatever ewe's back leg he could at only a week old!

I understand your dilemma, folks just don't realize how fast sheep and goats can develop and "get things done". Nobody here will criticize you, we know things happen. I will call up some goat people for you that know more than I do.

@B&B Happy goats @Ridgetop @frustratedearthmother @rachels.haven
 

docteurmccoy

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I have sheep, not goats. I have to separate the ram lambs at 2 months old because the frisky little devils will breed at only 2 months old. I have a set of twins right now and the ram lamb was humping his sister and whatever ewe's back leg he could at only a week old!

I understand your dilemma, folks just don't realize how fast sheep and goats can develop and "get things done". Nobody here will criticize you, we know things happen. I will call up some goat people for you that know more than I do.

@B&B Happy goats @Ridgetop @frustratedearthmother @rachels.haven
Truly appreciate it! Yeah I get scared of the judgement honestly, but obviously I want the best for my animals. Don't intend anything else. For what it's worth, they've been together since they were babies, breeder I got them off of had them together with all the kids from the year, and bought them together, so I suppose she could have been bred earlier, I just don't think she was though as he just hit the rut last month, and in a couple weeks or so from my research is when they start gaining weight, and.. yeah, been a couple weeks and now she's gaining. I feel like at a year old she should be fine but figured I'd ask just in case
 

Baymule

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I have bred ewes at 8 months, prefer to wait until 10-ish months old, just to give that time to mature. I don't think you have committed mortal sin, just watch carefully when her time comes to give birth. The best thing I can tell you to do is READ. There is tons of information in the forums, study them, read, read, read. You will read of kids born, kids lost, does giving birth successfully and everything that can go wrong. We put it ALL out there, we learn from each other, what goes right and what goes wrong. Welcome to farming small livestock.

I have rejoiced and I have sorrowed, weeping bitter tears. The joy far outweighs the sorrow, I take the hits because I love what I do far more than the losses that sometimes come. Just know and understand that when you have a loss, we are there for you. We will help you get back up and get back to your goats and move forward. Fortunately, losses are few.

If you do not have a separate pasture and shelter for your buck, you should do so. If not, he may breed the doe too soon after giving birth. So much to learn! Read the forums, it will help you tremendously. Ask all the questions that you want, there are no stupid questions. As you study the forums, you will learn and have questions, so ask away.
 

docteurmccoy

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I have bred ewes at 8 months, prefer to wait until 10-ish months old, just to give that time to mature. I don't think you have committed mortal sin, just watch carefully when her time comes to give birth. The best thing I can tell you to do is READ. There is tons of information in the forums, study them, read, read, read. You will read of kids born, kids lost, does giving birth successfully and everything that can go wrong. We put it ALL out there, we learn from each other, what goes right and what goes wrong. Welcome to farming small livestock.

I have rejoiced and I have sorrowed, weeping bitter tears. The joy far outweighs the sorrow, I take the hits because I love what I do far more than the losses that sometimes come. Just know and understand that when you have a loss, we are there for you. We will help you get back up and get back to your goats and move forward. Fortunately, losses are few.

If you do not have a separate pasture and shelter for your buck, you should do so. If not, he may breed the doe too soon after giving birth. So much to learn! Read the forums, it will help you tremendously. Ask all the questions that you want, there are no stupid questions. As you study the forums, you will learn and have questions, so ask away.
Thanks so much!! I guess this post may have given the false impression I'm new to this, but I've had a small farm over a decade.. just haven't dealt with this before. Also kind of took a maybe 4 year break from livestock so just getting back into it :)

Don't worry I've been planning to whether him assuming she kids successfully and actually has a doe or two. Wanted to wait though until she does kid, I'd hate to have her miscarry etc etc then not be able to breed her again the following year.

Anyways, I've been doing lots of research :) really appreciate the help and kind words. This is off topic but I really like your username lol. Take care!!
 

frustratedearthmother

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Your doe looks to be in good shape and doesn't look too far along to me. First option is that you could get a dose of Lutalyse from your vet that would abort the pregnancy. Second option is to ride out the pregnancy and hopefully end up with a healthy doe and healthy baby(ies) at the end. My next door neighbor once bought an 8 week old doe kid - that kidded at 7 months! These were pygmy goats and they cycle year round and grow up fast, lol.

If you watch your doe carefully and don't let her get overly fat chances are pretty equal that she'll have a good outcome over a bad one. Extremely fat does tend to have more problems.

Try to be with her at the birth. If you haven't learned to feel ligaments to determine if they are close to kidding - study it and practice feeling her rump every day so she doesn't surprise you and kid when you're not around. Watch her udder. It's also a way to help determine upcoming birthing - but not as reliable as the ligament method - especially on a first freshener.


Good luck and please keep us informed.

And - welcome to BYH!!
 

docteurmccoy

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Your doe looks to be in good shape and doesn't look too far along to me. First option is that you could get a dose of Lutalyse from your vet that would abort the pregnancy. Second option is to ride out the pregnancy and hopefully end up with a healthy doe and healthy baby(ies) at the end. My next door neighbor once bought an 8 week old doe kid - that kidded at 7 months! These were pygmy goats and they cycle year round and grow up fast, lol.

If you watch your doe carefully and don't let her get overly fat chances are pretty equal that she'll have a good outcome over a bad one. Extremely fat does tend to have more problems.

Try to be with her at the birth. If you haven't learned to feel ligaments to determine if they are close to kidding - study it and practice feeling her rump every day so she doesn't surprise you and kid when you're not around. Watch her udder. It's also a way to help determine upcoming birthing - but not as reliable as the ligament method - especially on a first freshener.


Good luck and please keep us informed.

And - welcome to BYH!!
Thanks so much!! I was actually wondering if there was some sort of medicine for that but was afraid to even ask as it seemed.. well, risky to ask. Thanks for the help! I don't think I'm going to go that route, a year seems like she should be okay.. I guess we'll see. Nope she isn't far along at all assuming she's pregnant which she probably is. Her stomach is just now starting to feel a little tighter than usual. It's very exciting :)
will definitely keep you all updated!!
 

Ridgetop

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When breeding Dairy goats years ago my 4-H children showed in all the dairy shows and breeding stock fairs they could. We had a large herd because you can't have just ONE or ten or twenty . . . .

Anyway with so many youngsters, we bred half the kids to kid at a year as yearling milkers and the other half kept dry t show as dry yearlings. My children put together show groups of Get of Sire, Produce of dam, Dry Herd, Herd in Milk, etc. because there were premium money prizes offered for placings 1 through 4 in each group. With the number of goats in their flocks they could put together several entries in each group class. This meant that they had to have some yearling milkers showing.

They would choose the oldest kids to breed which were the ones born the closest to January 1. They would be bred for a kidding date in February or March. They had no trouble kidding at that age - 13-14 months.

Your doe will be about 13 months old which should be ok. Hopefully she is a fairly good sized doe at this time. My major recommendation is to not feed her too much during the last month. The kids put on a lot of their size and weight during the last month and problems in yearling kiddings arise with small does and extremely large kids. By trying to keep her nutritional intake healthy but not being overfed in the last month you can avoid this.

Good luck.
 

docteurmccoy

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When breeding Dairy goats years ago my 4-H children showed in all the dairy shows and breeding stock fairs they could. We had a large herd because you can't have just ONE or ten or twenty . . . .

Anyway with so many youngsters, we bred half the kids to kid at a year as yearling milkers and the other half kept dry t show as dry yearlings. My children put together show groups of Get of Sire, Produce of dam, Dry Herd, Herd in Milk, etc. because there were premium money prizes offered for placings 1 through 4 in each group. With the number of goats in their flocks they could put together several entries in each group class. This meant that they had to have some yearling milkers showing.

They would choose the oldest kids to breed which were the ones born the closest to January 1. They would be bred for a kidding date in February or March. They had no trouble kidding at that age - 13-14 months.

Your doe will be about 13 months old which should be ok. Hopefully she is a fairly good sized doe at this time. My major recommendation is to not feed her too much during the last month. The kids put on a lot of their size and weight during the last month and problems in yearling kiddings arise with small does and extremely large kids. By trying to keep her nutritional intake healthy but not being overfed in the last month you can avoid this.

Good luck.

Thank you so much for the help :) I will definitely do so
 

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