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Too late in the year to breed?

Discussion in 'Livestock Guardians' started by WindyIndy, Oct 24, 2016.

  1. Oct 24, 2016
    WindyIndy

    WindyIndy Overrun with beasties

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    I had planned to keep my Great Pyrenees out (Maggie) with the sheep until she passes away, but then got to thinking that once she hits an older age she may not want to be in there when I put the ram in (I know I wouldn't!). So I thought maybe I would breed her and keep one of her pups, and then she can help to train the pup to guard the sheep. I'm not an expert on telling when a dog is in heat (I know sheep and horses ;)), but I think she may be now. Her bottom seems more swollen and she was licking herself.

    I just worry it's too late in the year now, I know dogs only stay pregnant for about 2 months, meaning the pups would be born late December early January. Would the puppies be warm enough if they were in my horse's stall with lots of straw? Would mama keep them warm enough? Or a added heat lamp? I could try and wait for spring/summer, but would that not be a good idea either as she would then need to guard the newly born lambs? If she had pups would that take her "away" from the sheep too much since I'm sure she wouldn't be out walking the pen as much?

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated! I want to do the responsible thing, I want what's best for her and the pups.
     
  2. Oct 24, 2016
    Green Acres Farm

    Green Acres Farm True BYH Addict

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    I have not bred any dogs before, but from what I have heard and read it can be very costly and things go wrong more often than you might think, not to mention time consuming. Also, Pyrenees's are especially difficult as you want to train them even at a very young age.

    From what you have described, it sounds like your dog is in heat. How old is she?

    I would be interested to learn care and medical wise how to prepare for a litter. I have a 4-year-old Schnorkie who I would absolutely love a puppy from. I don't want to be one of "those" irresponsible breeders or put my dogs health in danger, so I'd like to hear what the others have to say.
     
  3. Oct 24, 2016
    WindyIndy

    WindyIndy Overrun with beasties

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    I do know they can be difficult, one reason I was hoping that if it was one of her pups then maybe mama could help train it.

    Ok, thanks. She's about 4-5. They didn't know her age when we got her, and the vet tech doesn't think she can be any older then 5.

    I hear ya, I NEVER want to just breed to breed, I have personally seen that first hand. If I breed, there needs to be a purpose, and I won't breed unless I have the proper funds to raise a healthy litter. I am trying to do my research too.
     
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  4. Oct 24, 2016
    WindyIndy

    WindyIndy Overrun with beasties

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    Here are some pictures of Maggie
    upload_2016-10-24_20-38-46.jpeg

    upload_2016-10-24_20-43-41.jpeg

    upload_2016-10-24_20-44-16.jpeg
     
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  5. Oct 24, 2016
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    As far as the weather, I prefer cold weather pups over messing with flies and fleas, but I don't know where you live. She will be in heat about every 6 months and they are in heat for about 3 weeks, you breed them at about day 10.

    Here is an article that explains a lot about the heat cycle.

    http://www.thedogplace.org/Reproduction/Ovulation-timing_Gammill128.asp
     
  6. Oct 24, 2016
    WindyIndy

    WindyIndy Overrun with beasties

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    I wasn't even thinking about flies! Ick. I live in Wisconsin. Is there anything "extra" I should do to make sure everyone is warm enough? 3 weeks, wow! Why breed on day 10? And how do I know how long she has been in heat already? I don't usually look at her everyday, but if I was to guess she can't be even a week along....

    Thank you for that article, I'll make sure and read it.

    Maggie has had pups before, and the lady said she is a very good mother. She said she's VERY protective of them when it comes to other animals. I think she said she even bit one of her sheep, one reason why I want to separate her until they are older.
     
  7. Oct 24, 2016
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    They aren't receptive the entire time. The article explains the changes they go through and what to look for. A heat lamp is ok if you can be sure and be safe. But don't make it too hot or the mom won't stay with the pups as she will be miserable. Of course keeping them out of the wind and dry is the most important.
     
  8. Oct 24, 2016
    WindyIndy

    WindyIndy Overrun with beasties

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    Just got done reading the article, that was very interesting, thank you for posting it.

    I'm glad to know the lamp isn't necessary. I could keep her in my horse's stall, it's build in their run in shed so has very good wind coverage, with a nice thick bed of straw.

    I'll see about contacting the male's owner and set up a time to bring Maggie over. I'm excited and nervous all at the same time!
     
  9. Oct 24, 2016
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    Puppies are the best and I wish I had kept one from my last litter. Keep us posted.
     
  10. Oct 24, 2016
    OneFineAcre

    OneFineAcre Herd Master

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    My litter was born last of Feb
    They were born in the barn but I brought them in the house right after
    They stayed in for about 3 weeks
    Pearces Pasture had a litter a few weeks before mine in Indiana but she had built a stall
    That she heated
    It was closed in and she had an electric heater suspended from
    The rafters or something to keep the space warm
    Heat Lamp not a good idea
     
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