Top Reasons To Keep Roosters

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Some people believe that roosters are too noisy, as they crow so loudly - sometimes even at night - and they believe they are too aggressive, attacking the hand that feeds them. In spite of the occasional brawl when you keep more than one rooster, most roosters find a way to live together peacefully. While there are some disadvantages to keeping a rooster with your hens, there are also many advantages.

1. Fertilized Eggs​

Top Reasons To Keep Roosters

According to some people, fertilized eggs are healthier than unfertilized eggs. Even though science has not proven it, you can still sell more eggs if you advertise that they are fertilized. A rooster in your flock that fertilizes the chickens will be a boon to your business if you want to sell your eggs. You need a rooster that can mate with your hens to get fertilized eggs if you want to raise your own chicks. In some cases, buyers hatch the eggs themselves using their hens.

2. Protection​

The rooster guards the flock. Both in the air and on the ground, they are always on alert for predators. They sound the alarm if they see something that worries them. To protect his hens, the rooster fights to the death when the predator approaches. The rooster will work even harder to ensure the chicks are protected if you have chicks in the flock.

3. The Shuffle Dance​

A rooster performing the shuffle dance for a hen is a sight to behold. A rooster performs the shuffle dance as part of its courtship ritual. In the shuffle dance, he drops a wing and takes small steps in front of the hen to get her attention. Most roosters put on a show even though the hens ignore them. It is also common for roosters to do this when they are excited about food or coming out of the coop. A Shuffle Dance is most likely to occur in the morning.

4. Looks Good​

Top Reasons To Keep Roosters

The beauty of hens is unparalleled, but the significance of a good-looking rooster cannot be overstated. Any chicken yard looks even better with a rooster's huge comb, draped waddles, and gorgeous tail feathers. There is no doubt that roosters can grow into truly magnificent creatures, especially if they are of the larger breeds.

5. Finds Treats For Hens​

A rooster's cavalier behavior towards food is well known. It is common for free-ranging roosters to search the ground for tasty morsels, particularly insects. The rooster calls his hens when he finds something delicious. Then he drops the tidbit on the ground and clucks when he has caught their attention. He drops it on the ground in front of the hen when she comes to see what he has. It will be repeated until she is convinced it is worth eating if she does not like it the first time. Rarely does the rooster take food himself: he only consumes treats when there are plenty available.

6. Staying Close​

A rooster keeps flocks from wandering too far from the yard when they are free-ranging. The rooster herds the hens back to more familiar ground if they wander too far from the home base. Therefore, the rooster keeps the hens safe from predators who may lurk in new territory.

7. Harmony in the Flock​

There is a greater likelihood of discord in a flock of chickens without a rooster. They often settle fights between females and protect the weaker hens from the more dominant ones. It's inevitable that a hen will try to assume the leadership role without a rooster at the helm, and the other hens will challenge her. Consequently, fights break out. If there is a rooster in the flock, it is less likely that weaker hens will be bullied to the point of near death. Any hen pecking will stop with him.

8. Crowing​

Top Reasons To Keep Roosters

It is true that some people see a rooster's tendency to announce the day as a detriment, while others enjoy the sound of the rooster's announcement. Additionally, many roosters crow when a predator approaches their flock at night or when a stranger enters their property. You can rely on them to alert you when someone unwelcome is nearby as effectively as watchdogs.

9. More Fun​

The dynamic created by roosters make watching the flock more enjoyable. In groups with a rooster, different personalities emerge. There are some hens who are enchanted with him and spend much time around him, while there are others who aren't interested in him at all. Adding multiple roosters to the flock can make things even more interesting. Sometimes hens mate with a rooster that is less dominant, and may even develop a liking for a rooster that shouldn't be mated with.

10. The Natural Order​

Wild red jungle fowl, from which domestic chickens descend, live in small flocks with a dominant rooster. Chickens today are genetically programmed to live this way. You can easily tell that roosters have been arranged in this way by nature for a reason if you observe them with their flock. In your flock, you can see how the sexes interact, the way the rooster cares for his hens, and even the visual balance you notice.

There are few animals that are more economical to raise than chickens. The investment is well worth it. Are there any roosters in your flock? If not, why not, and if you have roosters, please share your experiences in the comments section.

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Mini Horses

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Large number of free rangers here. Several roos. One scurried his flock away when I brought the tractor in his field, to a far side. As I came around the field, off to other side he took them -- into the coop!!🤗. Good boy....huge, noisy monster threat protection.

Mine also hang near the nesting hen, until they lay that egg. Helps find a nest if you watch.
 

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Well then, you can come buy my two roosters.
They're unnecessary turds.
They crow all of the time, they start & don't stop when they see me. They harass hens, attack the 3rd roo. They're starting to try & attack me, but being banties, they're tiny & fast. So, I haven't been able to punt them across the yard yet...
Even the two turkeys hate them.
 

farmerjan

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Bantam roosters are like a whole different species.... most are more aggressive and sneakier..... and they will harass other roosters more it seems. All depends on what breed/crosses they are. Some are as chill as their large fowl counterparts... but many are just P'sITA. They also do seem to be more sexually aggressive than the large fowl.
 

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Bantam roosters are like a whole different species.... most are more aggressive and sneakier..... and they will harass other roosters more it seems. All depends on what breed/crosses they are. Some are as chill as their large fowl counterparts... but many are just P'sITA. They also do seem to be more sexually aggressive than the large fowl.
Yup, adorable perverts. These are Sebrights.
I've raised different regular breed roos, they always end up turds. But when I took in dozens of giant nasty turd roos from other people, they're all friendly. 🤷🏽‍♀️
White one has a mean eye, other has only stalked me once, but he also crows his head off when I'm outside. 🙄
Screenshot_20221112-152841_Video Player.jpgScreenshot_20221112-152856_Video Player.jpg
 

farmerjan

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As you said, you have a golden and a silver Sebright in the pictures. The silver is a pretty decent looking one with proper coloring... the golden has too much of a smutty tail; besides which they are supposed to have "hen tails" without the sickle feathers... the golden one has something else mixed in it... They are a very active breed... Good lacing like the silver one is hard to breed for.
 

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As you said, you have a golden and a silver Sebright in the pictures. The silver is a pretty decent looking one with proper coloring... the golden has too much of a smutty tail; besides which they are supposed to have "hen tails" without the sickle feathers... the golden one has something else mixed in it... They are a very active breed... Good lacing like the silver one is hard to breed for.
Yep, hatchery birds. Quality isn't their priority.
Either way, they left today to join 18 hens!
 
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