Waterproofing a wood goat barn floor - Pls ADVISE

WildOaksManor

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We have a small 18'x24' "barn" that was built on a slope, (with posts and an elevated chipboard subfloor) with the intention of becoming a chicken "mansion". As the build-out progressed, we realized it was too nice to put chickens in, and it sat empty all fall and winter while we tried to decide what to turn it into. I have since decided I need about twice as many ND's as I have now, and would like to turn it into a goat barn, with a milking area. Problem is, the flooring is currently wood (chipboard) subfloor, and we cannot pull it off and lay concrete, due to the slope, and the cost associated with it. I like a clean and easily maintained barn, and would prefer putting a drain in so I am able to use water to clean-up maybe once a year. We are near Portland OR and get lots of rain, and lots of mud.
My first thought was to use an epoxy paint (Like CM 15) with an integrated traction grit - but that would run me $100/gallon and tons of work. Other options would be BlackJack 57, or a siliconized elastomeric roof coating, or something like Henry's. I know BlackJack 57 has been used on many coop floors, and held up well, but I do not plan on having any litter on it - this will be more of a "clean" floor, for milking stanchions, a sink clean-up area, and maybe occasional goatling pens. It would also be walked on regularly and can't be slippery.
I would love to skip the hassle and use BlackJack - maybe putting rubber mats over it in some places - and really, I'm looking for the approval of anyone that has used it without bedding on top.
Other suggestions also welcome! Thanks everybody!
Manda
 

Latestarter

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Greetings Manda from the front range in Colorado :frow Welcome to BYH. Goat hooves are a bit more destructive to wood floors than chicken feet... The black jack I don't believe would work for your application, especially with no wood chips on top of it to protect it. The fact that it's chip board and not plywood further complicates things when you add moisture and mud in the equation... Top that with you wanting a no slip flooring and the ability to wash it out with water down a drain and the options become very limited.

Have you considered possibly doing a non-slip outdoor tile flooring inside? Another option would be that liquid acrylic stuff like they use on garage floors. With just the chip board though, you may have to first lay down an additional layer of plywood or poured thin set to make the floor solid so the tiles don't pop off... Jeeze, I don't know. Sure would like to know what you decide to do and see some follow up pic though!
 

babsbag

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Not sure about the chipboard but there are epoxy floor coatings you can put over wood. But I guess you know that as you mentioned the CM15. I was looking at that floor coating for the dairy and I think I will use it as it is flexible and I am laying it over plywood so it needs some flex. It is pricey but something like that may be your best bet in the long run.
 

WildOaksManor

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Latestarter said:
Have you considered possibly doing a non-slip outdoor tile flooring inside? Another option would be that liquid acrylic stuff like they use on garage floors. With just the chip board though, you may have to first lay down an additional layer of plywood or poured thin set to make the floor solid so the tiles don't pop off... Jeeze, I don't know. Sure would like to know what you decide to do and see some follow up pic though!

Thanks Latestarter - I had considered tile, but was hoping there was something easier/cheaper. Perhaps not though. We could lay plywood or thin set....I'll do what I need to to get it the way I need it, just stumped as to what the best option is.

Not sure about the chipboard but there are epoxy floor coatings you can put over wood. But I guess you know that as you mentioned the CM15. I was looking at that floor coating for the dairy and I think I will use it as it is flexible and I am laying it over plywood so it needs some flex. It is pricey but something like that may be your best bet in the long run.

After Latestarters response, the CM15 just moved to the top of my list. I need to do further research on it, and what it needs to be applied to, but I only have 250 sq ft to cover, so maybe it wouldn't be that bad. Are you concerned about the slippery-ness at all, or have an idea to combat it? Thanks for the imput.
 

WildOaksManor

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Ok, I am about to buy the CM15 (Flexible Epoxy) for my barn floor, which is currently chipboard. Anyone think I should not do this? From what I've seen, I can simply clean the floor well, vacuum, apply a bleach solution to any urine spots/stains, and put it down. Anyone have experience using this? Should I be doing anything else to the floor beforehand? Planning on applying 2 coats, and putting in a drain for easy cleaning, as I expect it to get a little wet once in awhile around the milking stanchion. Thanks for your help!
 

Assie

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Ok, I am about to buy the CM15 (Flexible Epoxy) for my barn floor, which is currently chipboard. Anyone think I should not do this? From what I've seen, I can simply clean the floor well, vacuum, apply a bleach solution to any urine spots/stains, and put it down. Anyone have experience using this? Should I be doing anything else to the floor beforehand? Planning on applying 2 coats, and putting in a drain for easy cleaning, as I expect it to get a little wet once in awhile around the milking stanchion. Thanks for your help!
I am following this because we are going to build a new barn and I would also like a floor that I can hose down. Great questions, thanks!
 

TheNewMrsEvans

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How did it turn out? We are trying to decide what to do with our shed floor...goats pee a ton!!!
 

WildOaksManor

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How did it turn out? We are trying to decide what to do with our shed floor...goats pee a ton!!!

We had a contractor come out and take a look at it, and have decided to add 3/4" plywood to the existing chipboard, (it's still in good shape, but we will KILZ it first) and paint the CM15 about a foot up the inside of the walls. Our wall framework will be pallet wood, and we will add a 2x12 (which has also been painted with the CM15) to the bottom as floorboard trim. Hoping to get it started soon! I have my first bred doe due in September, so knowing us, I'll get it finished a week before she's due. Haha.
 

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Hoping to save someone a lot of money and work.
Anything that you put down that is not draining will cause so many issues for you later. And by drain I mean dirt.rock sand, grit.

Even coating something to make it washable is going to be an issue.

Let me explain...

We had a large building... concrete floor... it had a drain as well... I thought awesome!!!!!!!!!!!! Put shavings/bedding down and loved it... for a minute. :\

If the concrete isn't sealed it will seep into it and stay there... which means the bedding is soaked and the concrete absorbed the urine but also absorbed and held the smell.
Will sealed concrete or wood floor the urine will not sink in but your bedding gets soaked very quickly as it cannot drain so it stays on top of that sealed surface.

You will find you have to clean out your bedding constantly... and I mean CONSTANTLY... but that isn't enough... you have to remove ALL the bedding to hose the floor or it will wreak.

We had no other option but to finish the season out - it was costly, intense labor and a royal PITB! Season over we built a new barn. It has dirt, then 6" of grit over it. Most will dig down ( we couldn't) and do rock, sand, dirt then grit.

We have done many floor/bedding systems over the years and the concrete ( think sealed floor as well) was by far the worst.
 
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