Weak Goat won't eat

Feo

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Hey, i just got back on town from a 3 week trip. When I left my 9 year old Saanen was fine, but now she is very weak and won't eat. She definatly has worms which I already treated with cydectin from the vet and SafeGuard. I believe she must've gotten them from the baby kiko I had a month ago. She can't get on the milking stand without falling, and won't eat grain. She has green snot coming out of her nose. Her normal schedule is worming as needed, free choice loose minerals, and higher protein goat feed. I don't have much RedCell left but I am giving it to her every day. Think I will try mixing her feed with molasses and maybe making her some treats or something to get some energy in her. She also just got a copper bolus. Any sugestions? She is 200 lbs, had a baby in May, and 9 years old.
 

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The green snot would potentially indicate a respiratory infection.
I would check her temperature and possibly treat with antibiotics and banamine.
 
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Donna R. Raybon

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Yes, check her temp and if a fever, consult vet as to what to give her. Banamine will help with pain, if it is her lungs, and keep scarring to minimum. I would also give B vitamins to encourage her to eat and to prevent pseudopolio. Sometimes they end up with respiratory infection due to being so anemic from the parasite overload.

If she is still in milk, you may consider dry treating and then quit milking as she is so overburdened and stressed. Talk to vet. I would, if it were me, and she is in the weak shape you say she is in. She won't be making much milk and will be high risk of mastitis due to low immune system and laying around.

I would not feed her any concentrates until you get her to eat roughage like hay or browse. If you feed concentrates and she eats, she is high risk of founder (rumen acidosis) even though she may be used to that amount of feed. Rumen flora and fauna live best at between 96*F to 105*F. Too cool and they die off/shut down, and too hot and same. Rumen movement and cudding are things you want to be seeing!!!! I have had them in this shape and needed a cud transplant as the rumen bugs had died off.

Be careful with the molasses as you can overdo and cause rumen upset. Better would be propylene glycol, but again, consult vet.
I would not give any more than a couple (as in two) of tablespoons of blackstrap molasses for iron and energy content.

Copper boluses scare me. Seen too many complications from giving them. If your feed, mineral mix are both supplemented with copper and you are not in an area with water high in iron content or sulfur, you should be OK on copper.
 
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Feo

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Thanks so much. I will check her temp. Where would I get b vitamins? Would I use normal human capsules or is there something other than a shot I can give her? Also, she normally get probiotics in her food, but as she isn't eating right now is that a good idea?
 

Donna R. Raybon

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Injectable B complex is sold in most places that sell cattle supplies. Once a goat is ruminating any oral B will be degraded in rumen before it can be absorbed by intestinal tract. If you have goats it is always a good idea to keep injectable B on hand as it it first thing I reach for if a goat is feeling puny.

Probiotic paste is a good thing, too. But, no substitute for a cud transplant if she has lost active rumen flora/fauna to actually ruminate. Get the vet to show you how to check for rumen movement.

When checking temp, never let loose of that thermometer as long as it is in her. I use a regular 'vet' type that is available at most feed supply stores with a loop in the end of it for securing with a string. About a foot of stout string (I reuse what came off a feed bag) attached on one end to a pair of artery forceps and the other end to the thermometer. Poke a hole in top of thermometer cover with a heated nail or drill a hole to run string through. That way you never loose your cap, and you can use forceps to secure to the animals hair so not a risk of loosing thermometer. Yeah, if they cough they can 'inhale' that thermometer and the result is not good!!!

I hope she makes it. I would also consult vet about giving her dex as sometimes they don't start making new rbc and in about 45 days you have a dead goat as a result. The dex kick starts the production of rbc for sure. Even the most experienced of us has had this happen, goats seem to be able to hide any illness until they are so sick they are almost dead. You may need to deworm more often or increase dose or even change family of dewormer???? Here in eastern TN throughout the warm months I basically have to deworm every 30 to 45 days.
 
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Feo

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Alright her temp is low. 99.4 Is there anything i could do without a vet? Its a long trip out there and I'd like yo try yo do someyhing at home. Will TSC carry vit. B?
 

Feo

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Hey guys i found it. She got 9ml. today and a dose of Probios... but her eyelids are still white and she is weak. In addition to the Cydectin she got she has had a double dose of Safeguard everyday.
 

Southern by choice

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Low temp is generally hypolcalcemia (milk fever)... do not force any grain this will cause more metabolic issues. from the temp.... however severe anemia can also cause low temp.
The red cell has b's already... it sounds to me she has been so heavily wormed that it is causing more issues. Heavy loads need to be handled with care and not "hit hard" as you read about so much.
When giving red cell do not give extra anything other than probios... no extra selenium, no extra copper np extra anything. and careful... that doesn't need to be given everyday or you run the risk of toxicity.

Leaves, vines etc... whatever she will eat but no grain... she may not even want hay.. Try crappy hay... nothing rich like alfalfa.

A blood analysis can tell you more, i would take her to a GOOD goat vet
 
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Southern by choice

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also get the protein down - she very well could have a combination of issues and protein fat inversion could be one.
 
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Feo

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Thanks so much. We just got a delivery of hay in today. When can i expect to see anything happen with the worms and anemia? There has seemed to be no progress
 
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