Weeks away from lambing? Maybe not!

BSue

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One year old and waiting for her to come into season.

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BSue

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So quick question, do ewes usually keep to the same schedule when they are going to lamb? For example, if the first time they lambed their udders bagged up a week before will they do that again? Or if they lambed right on day 147 will they probably lamb on the same day or maybe sooner because it's their second?
 

messybun

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So quick question, do ewes usually keep to the same schedule when they are going to lamb? For example, if the first time they lambed their udders bagged up a week before will they do that again? Or if they lambed right on day 147 will they probably lamb on the same day or maybe sooner because it's their second?
Animals, as a general rule, will do everything to throw you off their scent and drive you crazy. Each animal, and each animal’s pregnancy is going to be just different enough to keep you on your toes. And don’t suggest that one ALWAYS does it the same way, because they will change their entire life just to spite you 😂.
 

Baymule

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So quick question, do ewes usually keep to the same schedule when they are going to lamb? For example, if the first time they lambed their udders bagged up a week before will they do that again? Or if they lambed right on day 147 will they probably lamb on the same day or maybe sooner because it's their second?
No more so than our own pregnancies and births of our children.
 

frustratedearthmother

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Back when I used to keep track of such things I will say that my pygmy goats were pretty spot on with their previous pregnancies. Probably about 95% of my does would kid on day 145 and if they varied it was never more than a day. I don't keep track anymore - I just watch for signs of imminent kidding and act (or ignore) appropriately, lol!
 

Sheepshape

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Thinking of my old ewes who have lambed many times....they don't do the same thing each year with regards to pregnancy length but are fairly consistent as to whether they 'bag up' early or late.
 

Mini Horses

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There are things that are generally similar...the length varies more than some things by a few days. For many species the egg & sperm live for different lengths of time, then the fertilized egg attaching to placenta may take another couple days. Potentially breeding and fertilized egg attaching could take a week. That can make a difference in carry time.

Most often, while we have a breeding date, the delivery varies by such as above and growth of fetus. It is also a fact that some animals can "control" the last few days of ready. That's the make you crazy thing. So watching for other delivery signs are best.

When you see feet and nose coming, it's time. :lol:
 

BSue

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So at 1:45am this morning we were awoken to our one year old ewe bleating her head off. So we quickly went outside to find a limp almost lifeless lamb. She had cleaned it off about 90% but it had rolled away from her causing her to become scared I think. I think it was already suffering from hypothermia. So I quickly got blanket, tried to get some colostrum in her, maybe about 30ml and then into the house because she was not warming up. A couple of hours later another 50ml of colostrum and she seems to be reacting well. She still can't stand even though she tries. Something tells me that she lambed early because her udders are far from full. Totally wasn't expecting this, I thought her mom was going to lamb way before her. I don't know if there is anything else I can do?
 

Baymule

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This just happened to another member, read this for full instructions!
 
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