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Wet Cough: What Should I Do?

Discussion in 'Diseases & Injuries - Goats' started by Cdevore, Mar 27, 2018.

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  1. Mar 27, 2018
    Cdevore

    Cdevore Chillin' with the herd

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    We just got a Nigerian Dwarf Doe Friday. We were told she is estimated to be 8-11months old. We noticed that evening she had a cough. Her temp is 103.7 and she has no other symptoms. Her nose may be a little running but it's clear if it is (maybe just wet nose from water?). She's eating and drinking fine and like I said she doesn't have any other symptoms. Should I treat for lungworm or start her on an antibiotic?
     
  2. Mar 27, 2018
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Golden Herd Member

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    Greetings and welcome to BYH! So glad you joined us. Sorry it's because your goat is having an issue. Generally speaking, normal temp is ~102-103 so it's a little elevated. If she hadn't been standing in the sun or anything that might have raised it, it may indicate a low grade infection. She might also be adjusting to her new surroundings and any dust, pollen, etc. You could watch it for a couple of days and see if it goes away, stays the same or gets worse. I'm not a vet, so the following is just MHO. If you think it's an infection or pneumonia, you can pick up some antibiotics at the local TSC or farm store and hopefully that should help. Since you just moved her, she may be a little stressed and that can also cause a parasite bloom, so you might consider doing a fecal to see if she's having a bloom and needs deworming.

    There's a wealth of info, knowledge and experience shared in the multitude of threads. Browse around and see what interesting stuff you can find. By all means post away when the desire strikes you, especially if you have questions (provide as much detail/info as possible and pictures truly help)... With all the great folks here, generally someone will respond in no time at all. Please make yourself at home!

    Please consider taking a minute to visit the new member's thread and introduce yourself so folks can welcome you properly. https://www.backyardherds.com/forums/new-member-introductions.17/ also, PLEASE put at least your general location in your profile. It could be very important if/when you ask for or offer help or advice. You know, climate issues and such. I recommend at least your state as most folks won't be able to figure out where if you put anything more specific (county, town, street, etc) by itself. Old folks like me will never remember & look there first. To add it, mouse hover over Account top right and a drop down will appear. Click on Personal Details and scan down. You'll see the spot for Location. Then go to the bottom and save changes. Thanks! Hope you enjoy the site!
     
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  3. Mar 29, 2018
    Cdevore

    Cdevore Chillin' with the herd

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    Thank you for your response. Sorry I am just now getting back on here. I added my location and have looked around at different threads but still not exactly sure what I should do. We also have an 8-9 week old pygmy billy who now seems to be getting the runny nose (clear discharge) and gurgly sound. I have not heard him cough yet and no temp. They are both around 103. They got out Sunday and were gone for 2 days. I thought for sure they were gone for good due to the coyotes in our area but thankfully they found their way back here. Our billy was fine before they went on their little "adventure". They are both still eating and drinking and seem fine other than the runny noses, gurgly/mucousy sound, and her cough. They have stayed in their stable for the passed two days but it have been raining so that may be why. I have been giving them probiotics and keeping an eye on temp. Will they kick whatever it is on their own? Would it be Ok to worm them just in case? When should I think about starting antibiotics? I don't want to give an antibiotic unless it is absolutely needed.
     
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  4. Mar 29, 2018
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    I am not a vet, and seeing a vet would be great...that being said...

    IMO I would start the antibiotic ASAP. Goats go downhill quickly. My first drug of choice for respiratory is BioMycin, it is the same as LA200 or Duramycin but it doesn't sting. In spite of it being long acting I treat everyday for 4 days, I use the dose listed for cattle that is on the bottle. If you don't see improvement in a few days or if the temp goes up, discharge turns green, etc. it is time for a vet.
     
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  5. Mar 29, 2018
    Cdevore

    Cdevore Chillin' with the herd

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    Ok, thank you so much. She saw a vet before we bought her and she was fine. I figure the stress of the move and then the two of them running off caused the sickness. Is there really need for antibiotics without a temp though? I don't like to treat with antibiotics if not absolutely necessary. Also, is the BioMycin safe for my younger billy and is it safe to use on pregnant does? There is that possibility as she was housed with in tact males where we bought her from.
     
  6. Mar 29, 2018
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    Yes, yes, and yes. :)

    I use it on pregnant does. I have used in on small kids.
    I fought a cough in a group of kids one summer that went on for weeks. No fever. It finally went away when I treated with the antibiotics. Also, I consider anything over 103 a temp unless it is a hot summer day. Normal in my mind is 101-102.7
     
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  7. Mar 30, 2018
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Golden Herd Member

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    Do not "worm them just in case". You don't want to give them antibiotics despite indications of an infection... but you want to worm them with no indication or testing to even determine if they have worms, if so how bad, and what type worms to determine the best dewormer to use... I don't understand? Part of the problem with parasites building resistance to anthelmintics is because of folks doing just what you're proposing... Or not doing it properly for dosages and amount of applications over a proper time period. Before you do any deworming, you really need to have a fecal analysis done (maybe $10-$15 at a vet) to determine if there's a need for it. And some dewormers should NOT be used on pregnant goats or during some periods of a pregnancy.
     
  8. Mar 30, 2018
    Cdevore

    Cdevore Chillin' with the herd

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    First off, I never once said I was going to worm them. I simply asked if I should, so there is no need for your belittling. Second, I am not seeing "indications of infection." Temps are normal and the little bit of discharge (if it's not just water from drinking/grazing on damp grass) is clear. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I have ALWAYS been told that if it's not yellow/green it is most likely not infection. So, with that and them having no temp and acting normal otherwise, I did not come to the conclusion that it was an infection. That is exactly why I came here; to gain knowledge off of experienced goat farmers and find out what the best approach was. I actually used to work in a veterinary clinic and have actually run fecal tests myself so I know how inexpensive and simple it is to do that. Thank you for giving me some information but you could have gone about it without the rudeness.
     
  9. Mar 30, 2018
    Cdevore

    Cdevore Chillin' with the herd

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    Thank you so much for being so helpful! I considered their temps normal due to the rate of accuracy of the thermometer I use. Her condition hasn't changed (no better, no worse) so I think we are going to go ahead and try some antibiotics. Hopefully it will kick whatever is going on. :fl Thanks again. I'll try to post an update here if the antibiotics do the trick.
     
  10. Mar 30, 2018
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    I am not questioning the thermometer. I seldom see a goat with a temp of 103, they usually run 102ish. So when I do see 103 and other symptoms I start thinking antibiotics. Of course there are viruses too that won't respond to meds and I don't jump in and give my goats meds at every little cough, but it is just something to watch. If you have a small number of goats (I have over 50 now) you can learn what is normal for each goat and use that as a reference. I used to be able to that, too many goat now.

    I hope that it she gets better. Also, a sharp fluctuation in weather can set up pneumonia pretty quickly, especially in young animals.
     
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