What Do You Look For In A Farm Sitter

messybun

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What is your opinion and experience on farm sitting? I’ve been thinking about farm sitting some. I’ve done it for friends and neighbors, but not for strangers before.
What do you look for in a farm sitter and how much do you pay? What is the going rate, I was thinking by species and how many or some formula like that.
Next, a lot of people around me have horses. I do not have all that much experience with them. Books don’t count. Would you still hire someone who had to ask how you want them to respond if their animal bites, kicks, or otherwise?
I’ve never really had a horse try to charge or bite me. The ones I’ve been around are mostly well-behaved, but I know that can change when an owner isn’t present. While an owner should not expect me to do much with an animal you never know when an emergency will strike. Would you, as an owner, be comfortable leaving your horses in someones care who hasn’t dealt with a lot of horses?
Next, what type, if any, insurance should I get?
 

Baymule

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#1. Do the dogs like him or do they want to bite him?
#2. Common sense.
#3. Listens and follows instructions
#4. Has cell phone to text or call for questions or concerns. Can send pictures.
#5. Can come twice a day.

I pay a guy $20 per day to feed sheep and dogs. Dogs love him.
 

messybun

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Oh good. Should be good then. Most dogs like me, especially shy ones. Which, of course, has nothing to do with the fact they know I’ll bribe them later. 😉 chicken skin or dog biscuits are usually bestowed upon the dogs at one time or another.
 

messybun

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What do they look for???

A clone. :lol: wow....that's why few can get a farm sitter.
Gotcha! So, the real business opportunity is to figure out Einstein’s theory of time travel, and then enact it so they can farm sit their own animals while away on vacation.
How silly of me to not realize that’s what I needed to be working on.
 

Alaskan

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I am super cheap... so I beg neighbors to farm sit, and set stuff up so minimal work is needed. I pay nothing... they get to keep the eggs and milk.

The one time I couldn't get the neighbor to care for my milk goats, I found an acquaintance who had had milk goats in the past... so she had the setup to hold my animals, and the knowledge. She took them for about 2 weeks... her daughter sold the 2 kids I had and kept the money from the sale. So... I took the goats to her.

:idunno
 

Alaskan

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As to horses... body language is everything with horses.

Truly.

Read one of those things that go over proper posture etc in how to deal with horses.

My eldest son had it naturally, and as a tiny little kid would feed the horses and not have any issues.

My second son had issues! I worked with him on proper posture... and then he had zero issues. The horses didn't get trained.
 

Mini Horses

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True with horses and body language. Same to a lesser degree with some others. Always speak to a horse as you approach.

If a family has only a couple horses, it's not a bad thing to work. It's when they have multi animals, and milking! That's when it's knowledge needed and before visits. I've helped neighbors.

Most will depend on friends and family, working trade offs for each other. My DD will fed/water, count noses. She doesn't milk but would if "had" to, like emergency.

An owner will usually make it as easy as possible. They don't want issues either. Always have a vet number posted. In case.
 

messybun

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I’ve worked/played with my neighbors pony for about 7 years. Farmsat her plenty too. My grandparents also had horses about a decade ago. It’s not like I can’t handle a well behaved animal, I wouldn’t consider farm sitting if I couldn’t. my main concern would be if I’m watching and someone gets rowdy at Feed time. That’s why I wonder if an owner would lose trust if I asked what they’d want me to do.
I absolutely hate when visitors teach my goats bad manners. I’d hate to do that to someone’s horse; you know?
It’s probably not right, but my instincts are to pop the nose if something goes to bite me, namely a large animal. I’m not sure if that’s the right thing to do or if I’d upset the owners if I did that.
I can milk and do basics too. I can also deal with most emergencies decently well. I don’t lose my head and can stop bleeding while awaiting further instructions.
I ask these questions because, well, you know Murphy’s law.
 
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