What's the difference between...?

Nao57

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So I was looking at a Youtube video that listed all the different rabbit breeds out there. It was shocking how many of them there were. And some had huge ears.

I'm not sure I understand how rabbits and hares are different? In theory could someone farm hares also, or is there something wrong with them? (More than meat to bone ratios.) Do they have other differences also?

And also... there's this one type called a sable with dark ears and head with brownish or red brownish looking body. But there's another type of rabbit called a black and red fawn. I wanted to ask the difference between these two types? (These two types also look amazing in colors if you get a chance to see them. Although I've only seen them in pictures.)

Some of the rabbit types seem like they are so close to other types that its impossible to really tell what you have.

And curious how people find chinchillas? They seem really neat in the fur quality and coloring.
 

animalmom

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Regarding the different breeds... you could try asking (bing, google, whatever) the internet for rabbit clubs in your state. Something like "sable rabbit club tx" and see if you get any hits. If folks are keen enough to have a club then they would just love to chat your ears off regarding the special points of their breed.

Here's what I found on the internet regarding rabbit vs hare. I have shamelessly copied and pasted.
Believe it or not, rabbits and hares are completely different species, even though they look quite alike and are actually members of the same order of mammals (Lagomorpha). There are significant differences in physical appearance, behavior, and even lifestyles.

Rabbits and hares are different from the moment they are born. Baby rabbits — called kittens or bunnies — are born hairless and blind, totally dependent on their mothers. Baby hares — called leverets — are born with fur and sight, and they can move on their own within an hour of their birth.

Hares tend to be larger than rabbits, with longer hind legs and longer ears with black markings. While rabbits' fur stays the same color year-round, hares change color from brown or gray in the summer to white in the winter.

Rabbits and hares even tend to eat different foods. While rabbits prefer softer grasses and vegetables (like carrots!), hares like to eat harder bark and twigs.

Rabbits make their homes in burrows underground, while hares make nests above ground. Only the cottontail rabbit is known to make above-ground nests similar to those of hares.

Their different living habits make rabbits and hares respond to danger differently. Rabbits prefer to head underground to hide. Hares, on the other hand, use their longer, stronger hind legs to run away from danger.

Rabbits can be domesticated and kept as pets; hares stay wild. This reflects their behavior in the wild.

Rabbits tend to be social animals that live in groups. Hares spend most of their time by themselves, only pairing up occasionally to mate.

Hope that helps you.

Love your questions!
 

Nao57

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Regarding the different breeds... you could try asking (bing, google, whatever) the internet for rabbit clubs in your state. Something like "sable rabbit club tx" and see if you get any hits. If folks are keen enough to have a club then they would just love to chat your ears off regarding the special points of their breed.

Here's what I found on the internet regarding rabbit vs hare. I have shamelessly copied and pasted.
Believe it or not, rabbits and hares are completely different species, even though they look quite alike and are actually members of the same order of mammals (Lagomorpha). There are significant differences in physical appearance, behavior, and even lifestyles.

Rabbits and hares are different from the moment they are born. Baby rabbits — called kittens or bunnies — are born hairless and blind, totally dependent on their mothers. Baby hares — called leverets — are born with fur and sight, and they can move on their own within an hour of their birth.

Hares tend to be larger than rabbits, with longer hind legs and longer ears with black markings. While rabbits' fur stays the same color year-round, hares change color from brown or gray in the summer to white in the winter.

Rabbits and hares even tend to eat different foods. While rabbits prefer softer grasses and vegetables (like carrots!), hares like to eat harder bark and twigs.

Rabbits make their homes in burrows underground, while hares make nests above ground. Only the cottontail rabbit is known to make above-ground nests similar to those of hares.

Their different living habits make rabbits and hares respond to danger differently. Rabbits prefer to head underground to hide. Hares, on the other hand, use their longer, stronger hind legs to run away from danger.

Rabbits can be domesticated and kept as pets; hares stay wild. This reflects their behavior in the wild.

Rabbits tend to be social animals that live in groups. Hares spend most of their time by themselves, only pairing up occasionally to mate.

Hope that helps you.

Love your questions!
Thanks a bunch!

Wow. Its so amazing how different they are! I didn't realize they were so vastly different.
 

messybun

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Hello there. Or should I say hello hare? When it comes to raising rabbits vs. hares there is a ton of difference. Hares are WAY more jumpy and likely to have heart attacks they’re leaner meaner and far less domesticated. I’ve honestly not heard of general people breeding hares. They are just not meant for it and cannot thrive like rabb its. Now here it gets confusing, Belgium hares are actually rabbits bred to look like hares. And snow shoe rabbits are actually misnomered hares. Hares also can nurse up to ten weeks, even though they are born pretty much haring to go, with eyes open and peach fuzz in place.
As far as rabbit breeds, there are literally hundreds. But you also seem to be talking about coloration. Let’s dive into the two.
Breed: a breed is the general characteristics that defines a rabbit, and it will breed true. Like a lop will have floppy ears and a Netherland dwarf will have a smooshy face. A breed will be the characteristics, body shape, look, bone structure, size, coat texture, weight, growing range, and sometimes general temperament (even though there are exceptions).
Coloration: there are also a lot of colors out there! Colors are what the coat and nails are colored; sometimes eyes are also considered in this but not always. So a sabled coat like you are talking about could be a sabled Rex, a sabled lop, a sabled Flemish giant. There are also markings, markings could be a “splash” or “point”. A point coat has the nose and feet different colors then the rest of the body. A splash is a single splash of color, almost like paint was spilled on the fur. I can’t honestly remember all the markings right now, hopefully you get the idea. Now, color variation can“occasionally” be required as a breed standard, I can’t remember any of them right now, but I know there are a few breeds that only come in one or two colors. Like a Fresian horse can only be black with maybe a white snip or star to be considered a pure Fresian. When it comes to telling types apart it depends on if you mean color or breed types. Color can be tricky, but a lot of research and you’ll get the hand of it. And there are literal websites entirely dedicated to just coloration of rabbits. You can get lost for days. But you start to find the most common and/or your favorites and kind of work from there. If you mean telling breeds apart, it takes time and work to be able to tell them apart. It also gets difficult because there are mixed breeds too. Find the most common, lops, Californians, rexes, netherland dwarfs, lionheads, whatever seems to pop up a lot, and research them, become familiar with them, and then you’ll be able to pick out not only them, but when they’re mixed in a rabbit.To answer your other question, a sabled is considered sabled when they are 1) multi colored 2) when there are multiple colors on each strand of hair. So a rabbit that is red and brown, if every other hair, or if the under coat is one and the guard hairs are separately different colors they may look the same in a picture but when you brush the hair back you will see distinctly different colors. But on a true sable, every hair will have lines of distinct colors. It may be black at the base, a line of white, and brown at the top or any color variation, but each and every hair will have its own layer and stripes. Oh, and just for fun, look up astrex curly rabbits. There is TonS of fun research on them and it gives you something to see if you win the jack pot so to speak when you’re breeding lol.
 

Nao57

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Hello there. Or should I say hello hare? When it comes to raising rabbits vs. hares there is a ton of difference. Hares are WAY more jumpy and likely to have heart attacks they’re leaner meaner and far less domesticated. I’ve honestly not heard of general people breeding hares. They are just not meant for it and cannot thrive like rabb its. Now here it gets confusing, Belgium hares are actually rabbits bred to look like hares. And snow shoe rabbits are actually misnomered hares. Hares also can nurse up to ten weeks, even though they are born pretty much haring to go, with eyes open and peach fuzz in place.
As far as rabbit breeds, there are literally hundreds. But you also seem to be talking about coloration. Let’s dive into the two.
Breed: a breed is the general characteristics that defines a rabbit, and it will breed true. Like a lop will have floppy ears and a Netherland dwarf will have a smooshy face. A breed will be the characteristics, body shape, look, bone structure, size, coat texture, weight, growing range, and sometimes general temperament (even though there are exceptions).
Coloration: there are also a lot of colors out there! Colors are what the coat and nails are colored; sometimes eyes are also considered in this but not always. So a sabled coat like you are talking about could be a sabled Rex, a sabled lop, a sabled Flemish giant. There are also markings, markings could be a “splash” or “point”. A point coat has the nose and feet different colors then the rest of the body. A splash is a single splash of color, almost like paint was spilled on the fur. I can’t honestly remember all the markings right now, hopefully you get the idea. Now, color variation can“occasionally” be required as a breed standard, I can’t remember any of them right now, but I know there are a few breeds that only come in one or two colors. Like a Fresian horse can only be black with maybe a white snip or star to be considered a pure Fresian. When it comes to telling types apart it depends on if you mean color or breed types. Color can be tricky, but a lot of research and you’ll get the hand of it. And there are literal websites entirely dedicated to just coloration of rabbits. You can get lost for days. But you start to find the most common and/or your favorites and kind of work from there. If you mean telling breeds apart, it takes time and work to be able to tell them apart. It also gets difficult because there are mixed breeds too. Find the most common, lops, Californians, rexes, netherland dwarfs, lionheads, whatever seems to pop up a lot, and research them, become familiar with them, and then you’ll be able to pick out not only them, but when they’re mixed in a rabbit.To answer your other question, a sabled is considered sabled when they are 1) multi colored 2) when there are multiple colors on each strand of hair. So a rabbit that is red and brown, if every other hair, or if the under coat is one and the guard hairs are separately different colors they may look the same in a picture but when you brush the hair back you will see distinctly different colors. But on a true sable, every hair will have lines of distinct colors. It may be black at the base, a line of white, and brown at the top or any color variation, but each and every hair will have its own layer and stripes. Oh, and just for fun, look up astrex curly rabbits. There is TonS of fun research on them and it gives you something to see if you win the jack pot so to speak when you’re breeding lol.
"...you can get lost for days... "

Hahaha...it looks like it.

Thanks a bunch.
 

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