Wheat and grain question?

Nao57

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So I wanted to ask this here, though its sort of on the edge of things this group normally talks about. I do think it does relate to backyard agriculture however, so its OK for here.

I'm wondering if you think modern grains that are more genetically altered have more chance to make people sick or allergic, or digestive trouble more than older less changed breeds of grains? What do you think? (Mostly I guess this applies to wheat, but it could apply to corn also, and a few other things.)

I'd been recently wondering about this. And maybe others have already thought about this.

But a lot of mainstream information being pushed out there is by people who haven't actually ever really tried to grow stuff on their own or know things. And I think this means that their voices are somewhat twisted in a way because they haven't actually gotten real experience knowing what growing stuff is like. This means voices like here probably don't really get much say.

In documentaries about wheat research for example, it seems that they mostly only care about production genetic traits, and you don't have them ever say anything about human digestion compatibility.
 

messybun

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There is a huge difference between ancient grains and modern grains. You’re on the right track about digest ability too. Not to mention that certain strains have different disease resistance more than others, which is part of how crops have been protected forever. For me personally, I’m actually severely allergic to round up. So I can eat wheat from countries that don’t use those chemicals without trouble. But any American wheat and I’m miserable. It’s not just the strain for me, but chemicals, which is also a huge part of intolerances.
 

Nao57

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There is a huge difference between ancient grains and modern grains. You’re on the right track about digest ability too. Not to mention that certain strains have different disease resistance more than others, which is part of how crops have been protected forever. For me personally, I’m actually severely allergic to round up. So I can eat wheat from countries that don’t use those chemicals without trouble. But any American wheat and I’m miserable. It’s not just the strain for me, but chemicals, which is also a huge part of intolerances.

This is actually quite stunning what you said.

If someone has trouble with wheat, their whole life then eats wheat from countries that don't use those chemicals don't have any problems it says a lot.

Does this mean that someone like you or like people in my family that also have trouble with wheat would have to go to a strain of wheat that never had tampering though? Or would it be enough to use wheat thats grown locally free of pesticide, chemicals etc? I guess what I'm wondering also in follow up is if the chemicals stay in the wheat after exposure in successive seed generations?

I suspect that round up is making a lot of the allergies.

I had read that they use round up when they are harvesting the wheat. But that's kind of amazing that they'd do that because they don't actually need to do that. They used to grow wheat and just harvest it normally. And ironically those were the best growing years. It seems like there's no common sense to putting wheat in the

Thank you for speaking up.
 

messybun

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This is actually quite stunning what you said.

If someone has trouble with wheat, their whole life then eats wheat from countries that don't use those chemicals don't have any problems it says a lot.

Does this mean that someone like you or like people in my family that also have trouble with wheat would have to go to a strain of wheat that never had tampering though? Or would it be enough to use wheat thats grown locally free of pesticide, chemicals etc? I guess what I'm wondering also in follow up is if the chemicals stay in the wheat after exposure in successive seed generations?

I suspect that round up is making a lot of the allergies.

I had read that they use round up when they are harvesting the wheat. But that's kind of amazing that they'd do that because they don't actually need to do that. They used to grow wheat and just harvest it normally. And ironically those were the best growing years. It seems like there's no common sense to putting wheat in the

Thank you for speaking up.
If you have family who doesn’t feel great with wheat( not celiac of course) then start them out on Italian pasta. I can’t remember the brand now, but there is one that is grown and made in Italy; they don’t use the same chemicals. For me, I can eat modified spelt and modern wheat, it just has to be “clean” lol. That being said, I would always suggest wheat that you can replant the seeds from, the gmos that can’t be regrown scare me. No clue on how many generations roundup lasts though.
I wish I could grow my own, but most years we get crop dusters on the nearby fields (across the road nearby) and my house was built on a cornfield that was heavily chemicaled.
 
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