Who all could be in the same pasture?

September

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I was wondering if a person could keep the following animals all in the same pen arrangement and be relatively happy?

We know the goat and chickens do well together. How will adding a few pigs change the dynamics?
We would rotate them throughout the land with an electric fence. Would the goats and pigs do okay together for brush control?

What kind of cover crop would be suggested to plant behind them that would be safe for pigs/goats/chickens. Is there any kind of cover crop that could replant itself so the pasture isn't 100% grass?

Thanks in advance!
 

Baymule

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Pigs are omnivores. They will eat your chickens, could attack your goats. I know there are people who make it work, but be aware that things could go south in a big hurry. Pigs also carry parasites that would be very unhealthy for the goats. The goat people I know never run their goats over pig pastures.

How much land do you have, how many goats and chickens. How many pigs do you want and will you have breeding stock or just raise a couple of feeder pigs every year?

We have 8 acres. We raise hair sheep, chickens and have 4 horses. We raise a couple of feeder pigs every year. The pigs have a dedicated large pen and Pig Palace. I got tired of them destroying the pasture.

Is there any kind of cover crop that could replant itself so the pasture isn't 100% grass?

Yes! Weeds! :) My sheep love lambs quarters and giant ragweed. I let the plants get big and go to seed.
 

animalmom

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I have roosters and moscovy ducks in all my goat pens and everyone seems to be thriving and happy.
 

greybeard

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Well, tho I have no experience with goats here on this place, I was at a friend's property over the weekend and witnessed an unfortunate event wherein a goat wandered into a pasture with 4-5 roping horses in it. For whatever reason, the goat ran right up between the legs of one of the horses, and was quickly kicked out from under there. It then ran up under a different horse and was much more violently ejected by the same means, as the owner of the goat then came running across the pasture with what I presumed was a can of feed. The horses by that time had began trying to stomp the goat and the couple had trouble catching the goat but it finally squeezed thru the barbwire fence and cowered under a horse trailer. The couple carried it off..dunno if it survived the ordeal or not, but evidently, not all equines get along with goats.
Yes, swine will eat just about anything, and can be pretty efficient killers, but then too, nothing excels at killing like a common house cat. Fortunately, they like small prey.
 

September

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We are thinking of using American Guinea hogs, as we've seen a few homesteaders raise them with the flock alright. Could the chickens not break the parasite cycle in the pig before the goats went in?

We have 10 acres, and want to work rotational grazing to build soil, and keep the grass green for longer. I want to raise a mini herd of maybe 5-6 goats, and have a breeding trio of pigs (1 male, 2 females) which would be used for meat and selling. We also will have guineas, ducks, geese and turkeys in the mix as well to a varying degree. We live in red clay, and want to try to build up a small layer of good soil over time.
 

Baymule

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Pigs will turn the soil and add fertility with their manure. @frustratedearthmother has AGH and goats and chickens. I'll bow out and let her tell you how she does it. AGH have good dispositions versus some of the larger breeds, but they are still pigs with all the pig instincts.
 

frustratedearthmother

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American Guinea hogs are awesome. Mine have, at times, co-existed with chickens and/or goats. They are very gentle - however - they are still omnivores. I wouldn't leave them with anything giving birth or injured because they will follow the blood trail. They will also scarf up any eggs they can find, lol.

I have my barn divided where they can't get in with the goats. I don't want them competing for the goat feed. The goats have feeders inside the barn and the pigs have buckets outside. However, the goats will finish their feed and run outside and help the pigs clean up. Not my idea - but it happens without bloodshed. :\

I would never trust any other breed of pig to interact with my goats. I have been there for several pig births and the moms are gentle and have no objection to my presence. If I ever had a mean/aggressive Guinea Hog it would go in the freezer. I think that's important to keep the breed as docile as they are.

We butchered a couple this past weekend. The big boy had a good two inch layer of beautiful fat! We use the lard so we're happy to see it. The loins were really nice on him. The smaller one, was... smaller, lol.

They do grow slower than most of the "commercial" type larger breeds - but they grow well on pasture so it really doesn't cost any more in feed to grow them out. The ones that are confined stay nice and plump on a little bit of feed.

If penned up - they will root and turn the soil like any other hog. The ones that have free run of the pasture will graze and haven't rooted at all. I'll never own any other breed. :)
 

Grandma Betty

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If you are doing intensive rotational grazing, run the goats through first, followed by the chickens, then pigs, and then chickens again. The chickens will eat the parasites and break up the poop. The pigs will loosen the ground and work in semi digested seeds back into the ground. This is when you can top seed if needed to fill in spots (we use deer mix because it suits goats well). After the growth comes back, start at the beginning again. Although it is time consuming to move four herds every few days, it keeps your pasture in top condition and severely limits parasitic infestations.
 
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