Would Breeding Horses Be Profitable For Me?

ButtonHerder

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Hey all :frow so, I was wondering, would it be profitable (or would I lose money) to breed a horse?

  • I would only be getting one mare
  • I would just use someone else’s stud (for a fee)
  • The mare I would get is registered, and the stud would be too. They’re both Morgans
Then there’s the question of how old I would sell the foal at.

Thanks so much in advance!
 

ButtonHerder

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If it’ll help, they’re selling her for $1500 not including stud fee. And where I am it would probably cost around $100 to feed her for a month.
 

Palomino

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It's very hard to make a profit with horses. The most successful breeders are happy to break even.
A mare carries her foal for at least 11 months, maidens tend to go a little longer. So if it costs you $100 per month for feed, that is already $1100. Keep in mind that a bred mare has to eat a lot more than a normal pasture pet, until she has the foal, and while she's nursing, as that takes a lot out of them. Foals should be weaned about 6 months, some people do it earlier, depends on the horses, but I like to wait until 6 months. A growing foal will require feed too. You can take a deposit on the foal while it's still nursing, but unless it has an outstanding pedigree, it will bring more with training.
You will also have to factor in any vet expenses if anything goes wrong. Does the owner of the stud offer a live foal guarantee? That is very important. Otherwise, if your mare doesn't settle or loses the foal, you're out the stud fee. Usually there are health requirements for the mare to be bred as well.
I don't think you could make a profit. If all goes well, you may be able to cover some of your expenses. I'm not saying that to discourage you, but the reality is, in most cases, it's tough to break even. That being said, it can be a wonderful experience and foals are so precious!
 

CLSranch

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In short NO. You can get some of your money back if you just want or ride a horses. I have one mare that's been over worked the last 3 weeks because my other mare is about to foal, so I can't swap. I'm not breeding for the money and am already feeding them breed or not. Mostly I just have them to ride but occasionally work with them at neighboring ranches.
Also the market just came back up because it was so low for so long people quit breeding just to breed. Therefore if it happens again the foal price will drop and the feed will go up. It also cost to get them registered you have make sure the owner of the sire does all his paperwork and the organization does their paperwork.
I have a 3yr old AQHA born at the house from (highly) papered parents that still isn't registered because someone dropped the ball and I didn't want to bother the continuing phone calls.
 

ButtonHerder

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t also cost to get them registered you have make sure the owner of the sire does all his paperwork and the organization does their paperwork.
Do you have an idea of how much it would cost? I’m Canadian
 

farmerjan

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I agree with @Palomino and all listed points. Another thing I would like to add. What is the demand for a Morgan in your area. In other words, why would you want to buy a mare, breed her, wait nearly a year, then 6 more months to wean, training during that time, ......for what purpose? Not being a wise guy..... do you love the Morgan breed? Do you use a Morgan for riding, showing, or driving? Have you ever had a mare to foal? Any large animal to have young? A cow, horse, any large animal? Horses are much more "fragile" when it comes to foaling than a cow.... the time for a foal to be safely born is much shorter than a cow and your window to help if there is a problem is shorter.
Many mares will foal when you turn your back to go to the house for a quick trip to the bathroom.... many will foal out in the pasture when you are sure they are no wheres near to foaling.... but if there is a problem, you have little time to right a difficulty.
I bred Appaloosa's when there was a decent demand for them. There is more expense with them than ever with most cows. I had a market for a few foals and was able to sell a few. There is no market for horse meat in this country. There are no kill plants. So now there are many many horses with no place to go today. I am not suggesting that what you breed is only kill quality... but what I am saying there are many horses that don't have a "home" now, breeding and bringing more into the country will only add to the surplus.

As palomino said, most breeders are happy to break even/make their expenses. If you were actively showing, with a good reputation for having quality animals, and had a bloodline that would be in demand such as high quality quarter horses for cutting and reining, or warmbloods that are used often in jumping, cross country , steeple chasing, or something like that ; then I would say, maybe yes.... But to just buy a mare to breed with no plan down the road would be a big money pit for you in most instances.

The other thing, at least with a cow, sheep, anything, if it does not sell, or turn out, you can eat it. Sadly, horse meat is totally unacceptable as a food source in this country. I am not saying that there should be wholesale slaughter of horses, but there are some horses that should not be saved or bred or kept....the best place for many would be as a food source.... if only for dogs and cats and other carnivores.... there are alot of cows that have great personalities too...
 

ButtonHerder

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I agree with @Palomino and all listed points. Another thing I would like to add. What is the demand for a Morgan in your area. In other words, why would you want to buy a mare, breed her, wait nearly a year, then 6 more months to wean, training during that time, ......for what purpose? Not being a wise guy..... do you love the Morgan breed? Do you use a Morgan for riding, showing, or driving? Have you ever had a mare to foal? Any large animal to have young? A cow, horse, any large animal? Horses are much more "fragile" when it comes to foaling than a cow.... the time for a foal to be safely born is much shorter than a cow and your window to help if there is a problem is shorter.
Many mares will foal when you turn your back to go to the house for a quick trip to the bathroom.... many will foal out in the pasture when you are sure they are no wheres near to foaling.... but if there is a problem, you have little time to right a difficulty.
The demand is probably less based on breed, and more on quality and how broke the horse is.
The purpose for doing this is that I’ve been around horses all my life and my love of them has only grown, and I want to get very seriously into breeding in the future, and thought it would be better to start small. And I’ve always adored and admired the Morgan breed, I have done lots of research on the breed, and have been around them (though never owned) I have never had a mare to foal, and I realize that they are nothing like cattle. I’ve been around tons of to calve cattle and seen lots of births, and own cattle myself.
The pasture she would be in is very close to the house, and I’m home almost constantly. This is also a mare who has never had any foaling issues, but I know they could still occur, and I’ll be ready.
 

ButtonHerder

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As palomino said, most breeders are happy to break even/make their expenses. If you were actively showing, with a good reputation for having quality animals, and had a bloodline that would be in demand such as high quality quarter horses for cutting and reining, or warmbloods that are used often in jumping, cross country , steeple chasing, or something like that ; then I would say, maybe yes.... But to just buy a mare to breed with no plan down the road would be a big money pit for you in most instances.
I know now that I probably won’t be making any money, but I knew this would probably be the case.
 

ButtonHerder

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The other thing, at least with a cow, sheep, anything, if it does not sell, or turn out, you can eat it. Sadly, horse meat is totally unacceptable as a food source in this country. I am not saying that there should be wholesale slaughter of horses, but there are some horses that should not be saved or bred or kept....the best place for many would be as a food source.... if only for dogs and cats and other carnivores.... there are alot of cows that have great personalities too...
The mare has a really good conformation, and so does the stud, with both having good bloodlines. I’m very confident that I would be able to sell her offspring, they are an animal that lots of people want around here.
Thanks!
 
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