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Ridgetop

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I thought the problem was that she was escaping and wandering away.

If she stays close to home and you, maybe her temperament is more all around guardian. Just because an LGD is one of the LGD breeds, their individual guarding techniques differ within a litter. Some prefer the sheep, some don't. They might all be excellent guardians in different locations and situations.

Rika and Angel are sheep committed, preferring to be with the flock where they can watch the gully and perimeter fences adjacent to open territory where the coyote and wandering dog threat is greatest. They will wander up to the house for R & R with us occasionally during the day, or when their "shift" is over. But until the sheep are put up at night they tend to remain with them. Bubba is an all around guardian, preferring to remain closer to the house on either side where he can monitor anyone coming up the road. He still has a view over the front pasture from the patio on one side, while from the other side (driveway) he can over see the barn with lambs. When we are lambing, he tends to be excessively alert to every sound from the lamb jugs and creep. But in seconds he can be with any other dog that sounds a warning across the field.

Since you have 2 other LGDs why not let this one be your all around guardian, protecting the house and property while acting as backup to the other guardians who remain with the flocks. She is quick enough to join them when necessary. She is also only a year old which means that she is not quite ready to face off to a pack of coyotes on her own. I don't mean she won't be willing, I mean that at 1 year old she hasn't got the savvy, size, and fighting experience necessary to go against a pack and come out unscathed.

It sounds like she is testing every aspect of her possible guarding duties while she makes up her mind where she refers to stay. Kind of like kids their changing their minds about what they want to be when they grow up! LOL

Love of water could be from her Pyr ancestry. Our big male Pyr used to go out around 5pm in the heat of summer and sit in the large horse trough. He looked like someone in a hot tub waiting for the waiter to bring him a cool adult beverage! :lol:
 

Ridgetop

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Well, she is a teenager right now so very high energy. Running and chasing are natural at this age. Hunting rabbits is a good pastime for her. With no other dog to play with, watch that she doesn't try to play with lambs. It can be common behavior at this age, particularly with their favorite BFF lambs. Bloody ears/legs are a sign that she is trying to play with sheep in her doggy way. Since the sheep will not turn and bite her like another dog would, she thinks they are enjoying the chasing and nipping game. This is the type of behavior that starts friendly dogs into chasing and killing sheep. At first it is a game, later it becomes too much fun for the dogs and they become confirmed sheep killers. Most LGDs that try this sort of teenage chasing behavior do it around 12 months. You need to stop this behavior immediately if she starts doing this. Once you stop the behavior they eventually outgrow it. It doesn't sound like she is doing this behavior yet. If she does, put her in a pen with rams or other tough sheep that will not allow her to try to play with them. Getting butted by adult sheep seems to teach them that this is undesirable behavior. Having the sheep discipline her behavior is better that you trying to discipline her.

Otherwise, how much time is she spending away from the sheep? Have you had any losses while she has been with the sheep? It is possible that while you think she is not guarding, she is still a deterrent in the fields. Do you bring your sheep and lambs up to night folds? It makes it easier on the dogs in high predator areas, especially with a young inexperienced dog.

It is possible that her protective instinct is so strong that she is trying to protect you as well as the sheep.
 

Ridgetop

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Teenagers! She should outgrow it. Eventually.

The coyote was probably scoping out the property so see how sincere your LGDs were. Her barking tells predators that she is there so they don't come in. That may be all you need.
 

Ridgetop

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Chaining up your LGD is not a good solution. They are in danger of injuries from predators if they don't have complete freedom to move when fighting predators. Getting tangled in the chain or rope is a big danger too.
 

misfitmorgan

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What is the point of having her as an LGD if she is chained to things? Why dont you actually train her so she behaves how you want. You can't just drop a dog from a 15ft x 15ft kennel into a pasture and expect her to be a good LGD. You need to find a way to get rid of her energy and wear her out, train out her food aggression, forcing her to spend less time with you is never going to work, train her not to chase things and to be calm around the sheep. Stop ignoring advice from people who have already been down this road and succeeded where you are repeatedly failing.
 

Mini Horses

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As I recall, you were the one complaining about this dog escaping the barn and fields you wanted her to remain in. You complained about her chasing the rams. You felt she was escaping.....you obviously felt this dog was not following your wants. Now you say she's staying in?

Hopefully someone will give her a home where they appreciate her. Plus, there are fully vetted, registered animals for what you are asking or very close....and trained to basic commands. Now, her value is very reduced after her time and experiences there. A lot of retraining will be needed. At her age that may be difficult, certainly challenging. She's lovely to look at.

Maybe she will have you trained before she is sold. 🙃👍😎
 

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