A NEW DIRECTION FOR THE OLD RAM

Baymule

Herd Master
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
19,725
Reaction score
49,001
Points
803
Location
Northeast Texas
Kim Kardashian butt! :lol: :lol: The brown and white ewe lamb is quite a looker. The last two are chunky! They look like blocks on legs.
 

The Old Ram-Australia

True BYH Addict
Joined
Jan 18, 2011
Messages
762
Reaction score
1,191
Points
263
CREEK news: the following is an update on our restored erosion gully creek-line.The burst of warm weather has resulted in an explosion of growth in the creek bed.The pools that control the water speed in the lower reaches are full to the "brim" and a slight discharge is evident....To my mind these photos prove the concepts we designed actually work and work really well if one is a little patient . Photo 1. is downstream to the boundary .Photo 2. is the control ponds and Photo 3. is upstream from the ponds show the speed break in the drainage line.
 

Attachments

The Old Ram-Australia

True BYH Addict
Joined
Jan 18, 2011
Messages
762
Reaction score
1,191
Points
263
G'day group, I thought it appropriate to show the results of our earlier "cool burning" . We are really happy with the outcome and it just shows you that you don't have to have been here for 40 k years to get a great outcome ,you just need to be willing to take the time to understand your landscape and how it functions....The crowns of the Poa have sprouted and after the next shower and a bit more warmth they will begin to flower,with the old flock we used to put the rams in on this feed to get then ready for "work", but this year we will introduce a group of ewes and lambs to control the new growth and allow the other grasses to flourish around them.
 

Attachments

The Old Ram-Australia

True BYH Addict
Joined
Jan 18, 2011
Messages
762
Reaction score
1,191
Points
263
Sorry Bay i did not answer your question. I am going to start to re-use it and have added weighing bars for electronic scales...The reason I stopped was the Suffolk's were to heavy and used to tip it when I rolled them over,but it is great for "marking, foot trimming and drenching and with the added ability to weigh them it will be great again,when I get organised of course...T.O.R.
 

The Old Ram-Australia

True BYH Addict
Joined
Jan 18, 2011
Messages
762
Reaction score
1,191
Points
263
G'day folks,thought I would post some outcomes of our planning for the next 6 months.At this point of time of our 300 acs we should be able to "lock-up" about 150 until next Jan/Feb ,this will allow all of our warm season grasses to grow ,flower and seed along with the re-establishment of our Clovers (many of which are old vars that can cause fertility problems when grazed green). We have also identified the area for next Falls "cool burn",these decisions were made as we conducted our annual weed spraying program,we "spot spray"only one weed ,but we have to cover most of the 300 acs in a grid pattern (on foot) and this takes place over about 6 weeks before flowering takes place..

As an aside hear are a couple of pic's when "The Old Ram" was a "young one".I found them in an old purse of Jenny's during a clean-up.

Our update. Recently we had our 2 yearly Bone Scan,mine had not changed but Jenny's bone density had decreased by 50% on the last one. In a routine visit it was discovered that she had an irregular pulse and so a ECG was conducted and she has developed a heart issue.Her condition has continued to progress requiring 2 separate medications twice a day.She has relinquished all her old duty's now and only "bakes" on a few occasions. Farm work is limited to about 2 hours per day,which is taking a deal of planning on my part.Every aspect of the house is now my responsibility which at first was quite a "shock" (I have new found respect for females who increasingly work outside the home and run a home as well).I guess i am lucky in some respects in that i have the ability to plan and organise work schedules.

This Spring is turning out to be a "ripper" with the best pasture conditions for about 8 years.It is such a relief after the "big dry",fires ,floods and now the virus.

Well ,that's about it for now,Hope you are getting organised for the coming cold weather.In late news a sale of Aussie White rams resulted in a top price of $53,000.00(not a typo Fifty three thousand dollars).I understand there was a group from the USA who purchased a few to get semen straws for export to the USA...T.O.R.
 

Attachments

Baymule

Herd Master
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
19,725
Reaction score
49,001
Points
803
Location
Northeast Texas
No wonder Jenny kept your picture in her purse, you were quite the handsome young man. I am so sorry to hear of her further decline and health issues. Many medications can cause bone loss. A situation of damned if you do and damned if you don't. Prescriptions have so many side effects, it's hard to know what to do. My prayers for you and Jenny.

My husband had open heart surgery at age 70, he's 75 now, a 3 way bypass. Of course the doctor loaded him up on heart medications, which played havoc with his memory. He couldn't even remember what happened the day before. Back to the doctor we went and one by one, I got him off the drugs. Now he takes fish oil daily and vitamins. I raise our meat and most of our vegetables, so we eat healthy. He gets plenty of exercise on the farm. His blood pressure is above the approved numbers, but that is where he operates the best. Too low and he can't function. It's a double edged sword.

Yes, running the household is quite a job. Many women juggle job, children, husband and household duties. Thankfully, more men pitch in these days, helping and working together for the good of the family.

If farm duties are limited to 2 hours a day, how are you going to walk the grid, spraying the weed? Is Jenny still able to go with you on the farm?

Do you normally allow half to farm fields to lie fallow over the growing season? Or is this something that you do from time to time to rejuvenate the grasses? By cool burn, do you mean burning off the fields in a seasonal pattern?

$53,000 for Australian White rams! Those must be the best of the best! I wish we had more breeds here in the US. Countries must be so careful in importing livestock. Semen straws and an upbreeding program seem to be the way to go, but it is a long process.
 

Bruce

Herd Master
Joined
Feb 4, 2016
Messages
14,274
Reaction score
35,181
Points
723
Location
NW Vermont
Well it's only $38K in the US ..... :th

we "spot spray"only one weed ,but we have to cover most of the 300 acs in a grid pattern (on foot) and this takes place over about 6 weeks before flowering takes place..
300 acres looking for a specific plant? Wow, it must be really nasty.

:hugs for you and Jenny with her declining health. It is hard on both of you.
 

The Old Ram-Australia

True BYH Addict
Joined
Jan 18, 2011
Messages
762
Reaction score
1,191
Points
263
Hi ,Bay I used to have the practice of leaving one paddock each year to completely recover and increase diversity over the are.Then select another in the fall to allow the cool season grasses to re-energize for the coming years grazing .This year has been so good that we can extend the practice to cover quite a number of them after what has been a couple of years of depletion due to the "dry"....Jenny comes with me and is great at "spotting" any that I miss as we travel along.

Our system of "cool burning" is to reduce and re-invigorate the Native grasses without scorching the surrounding species.In an earlier post we showed the burn in progress and recently the re-growth that was happening.

Well Bruce,after doing this each year for the last 20 years your brain is trained to respond what your eye detects as you scan the pasture ..Using a grid system is made way easier because of the permanent steel fencing and we can stop at any time and pick up where we were the next day because we use a "dye" in the mix...T.O.R.
 

Latest posts

Top