Baymule’s Journal

Baymule

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I don't think it would work. The purpose of the fabric is to let water soak into ground while keeping gravel from sinking. Shingles are nonpermeable and when pressed together I'm not sure water would go between.
With a roof over it, wouldn’t it stay dry inside?
 

SageHill

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er soak into ground while keeping gravel from sinking. Shingles are nonpermeable and when pressed together I'm not
With a roof over it, wouldn’t it stay dry inside?
Depending on the barn you could get blow in through vents, eaves, open doors, etc. And of course there is the sheep-pee.
I love the idea of using the shingles, but there is something that is niggling at the back of my mind that it could be another nightmare. Something along the lines of them slipping (??) - but I can't quite put my finger on it. Also - though I don't know about when they'd be "underground", as they age they crack. Also thinking that as any water would seep between them/work its way through the seams something is bound to go wrong. I started to wonder about toxicity - so I did a quick google - that part ~seems ok, but some shingles pre-1989 can contain asbestos.
I don't know about the cost - but there is greenhouse flooring fabric that is very heavy duty and would not be as easy to tear/rip as landscape fabric. I think any fabric would provide a good base and be "stronger" than the shingles.
Still that crazy niggling feeling in the back of my mind on the shingles.
 

Baymule

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Mailbox pictures.
Both, by my driveway. To add to the culvert, they gotta go.

IMG_4338.jpeg


Around the bend, past the 2 gates going into this pasture. I reset the mailbox.

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My mailbox, still by the driveway. I’m gonna get a new post and mailbox and set the new one at the end of the culvert extension. See that sharp turn to get into my driveway?

IMG_4340.jpeg
 

Ridgetop

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Not sure about using the shingles on the ground as water barrier. You could confine them inside a foundation wall for the barn, but if you lay the shingles on the ground and then cover them with dirt will you get standing water on top of the shingles and defeat the purpose? And if they are impervious to water the sheep pee and any water in the barn won't be able to drain into the soil underneath so you will have standing water in the barn on top of the shingles and mixed with the dirt - mud. You want the barn floor to be up higher than the ground so water can drain out or off the barn floor.

The possibility of asbestos in the shingles (pre-1989) is a risk factor too. But when was your house built? Your house should be post 1989 :fl because otherwise if they are asbestos shingles, you might be stuck for a hazardous materials fee to dispose of them. :( I think it is probably post 1989 from the design layout.

On the other hand, you could salvage any good shingles and use them to roof pasture shelters. And a chicken coop.
 

Larsen Poultry Ranch

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Is there a possibility of the shingles leaching chemicals into the groundwater or surrounding pastures if used for fill? Not sure what they are made of besides tar?

My opinion is the landscape or garden fabric would be the safer bet. There's a type of gravel I think it's called road base? It's got a lot of crushed finer rock in it, you put that down first and compact it, then the gravel, so your gravel is less likely to shift or sink.

Have you talked to anyone at the gravel place? Wherever you were planning on getting the gravel or road base from? They might have more suggestions or reasons to do/not do xyx, etc.
 
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