Baymule’s Journal

SageHill

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Bennett, he’s lived on this road all his life, has never seen this land clear cut. New owner is in his 40’s, inherited the land and now has stripped it of all timber, hardwoods too. It’s been logged before, but only taking the big trees. I’m hoping he doesn’t put in a pine plantation, all pines in rows and not much food for wildlife. But, not my land. I’ll sit here on my 25 acres and be a good steward of my own land.
Kind of like the "farmer" who bought the grove behind me and took the old grove high producing trees out. He just finished planting .......... 8,000 trees (DH asked the guys putting them in) -- or should I say saplings and all new irrigation because the previous was destroyed when they took out the trees. AND they are planted way closer than they should be.
 

Baymule

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I went to the auction in Navasota today. Truck still in shop, I drove over just to watch. Prices way down. Young ram lambs like mine sold for $85. Normal $120 to $150. Bear in mind I haven’t done much in the way of selling lambs for 2 years.
There were lots of goats and sheep, grown ones, in poor condition. I drove past miles and miles of brown dry fields. How well I know that! There were also goats and sheep in good condition but I sure could tell animals are in distress. Heat, drought, no grass, no hay, is taking its toll.

Highest prices went to 2 Boer bucks. One red moon spotted, one black moon spotted, $340 and $350. 2 or 3 years ago, when BJ and I were at auction, they would have brought $500 or $600. Highest priced sheep was black head Dorpers, rams, in the $250 range, low for big beefy rams. A group of 5 black head Dorper ewes, thin, looked like they just weaned lambs, but had good structure—sold for $85 each. I was floored. A little TLC and they will come roaring back, big and beautiful. A family bought them, they were thrilled with the ewes. Surely a great purchase!

Lots of little goats, I suppose Nigerian Dwarfs, but I was not impressed with the udders. They were in good shape, cute, but definitely not good quality milkers. The staff would push a baby in the ring, the auctioneer would go AAWWW…., look at this cutie, and the bidding got stupid. LOL cute and spotted makes $$$.

I enjoyed the auction but was sad for the peoples selling, due to drought.

I’ve been watching the market reports, but they don’t give much information. At the bottom of the cattle report, broken down by groups, finally comes the goats. Sheep usually not even included, just goats. It reads. $30-$350.

So I’ve decided to go to the Nacogdoches auction, it’s only an hour away, same market report (that doesn’t have any details) so why dive 2 hours for the same thing. I have 6 ram lambs that need t go. I’ll take what I get and be happy.

For a good auction, graded and priced by the pound, I’d have to go to west Texas. The closest auction like that is 3 1/2 hours away in Waco. Once I get my numbers up and could take a trailer load, that could be a profitable trip, but not for 6 lambs.

@Mike CHS this is the Waco market report. Is it in line with the auction y’all take lambs to?

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Mike CHS

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That is a little lower than we got for our last bunch but overall I was pleased with our last sale. They listed two of our cull ewes as fat (they weren't) but they always list our adult ewes as fat since they are bigger than most of the sheep around here.
 

Mini Horses

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Sad but true...the drought brings in poor condition sale animals. Often selling to not watch starve, hay is hard to find in some areas. Transport costs for hay is killer. In my area hay, haylage, donuts and lengths of fermenting feed is everywhere. Still costly to buy but, farmers raising for own are in good shape. Pastures still in use. Corn is now being harvested.

Then, there's the seasonal price changes. This isn't the "best" time for sales. You might check local processors for their availability and consider listing a few for private sale....if you can suggest where to process. You have any small processors that also offer a customer sales area? Most don't but, some might.

Let's just say -- it's a crapshoot!
 

Baymule

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Wrong time of year to sell, but after scrambling around, moving twice, I had to get some ewes bred. I’ll get myself and sheep in order. Drought sure didn’t help any.

Usually the price per head stays close to the per pound price. The east Texas sheep and goat auctions are not the main focus, just an add on for the cattle auction. I’ll get enough numbers some day to make a trip to Waco worthwhile. And trying to get a registered flock going, that increases the price for good breeding stock.

And hopefully DS to do some hunting during deer season and put venison in the freezer

I told a neighbor to bring me 2 and I’ll make smoked link sausage for both of us, one for him, one for me. DS usually doesn’t have enough time when he’s off.
 
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