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Best Time to Breed a Dog?

Discussion in 'Other Animals' started by Lanthanum, Mar 15, 2017.

  1. Mar 15, 2017
    samssimonsays

    samssimonsays Milo & Me Hoppy Tail Acres

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    You shouldn't breed until a minimum ofor 2 years old to allow them the mature fully.
     
    TAH and NH homesteader like this.
  2. Mar 15, 2017
    Southern by choice

    Southern by choice Herd Master

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    Because there is no exact day- you must understand the signs of when the bitch is ripe. Dogs are different some early some late.
    Knowing the signs is the key.
    Any book or any reputable site should have this info, so again, maybe more time would allow you to be better educated and prepared.
    Not being a jerk here but breeding should be for the betterment of the breed, producing purposeful animals and that takes commitment.
    1 litter and spay says that none of those things or becoming a good breeder are remotely your intentions.
    I am a BIG believer in helping those that are trying to start out and have a passion and want to do things right, with purpose etc. but one litter wonders I do not support or advocate.

    Have either dogs been tested for STD's?
    What do you know about the dog? Temperament, hips, eyes, elbows, skin, genetics?
    How often does your bitch cycle?
     
  3. Mar 16, 2017
    samssimonsays

    samssimonsays Milo & Me Hoppy Tail Acres

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    The hips xrayed is a huge thing. Another, I have a blue merle collie and we have to be careful with colors when crossing but I do not know details on bullys color genetics whatsoever so if you haven't already I suggest looking into if any colors shouldn't mix and match. I've found the blue colors to be difficult to cross in a lot of breeds. And if they are it can cause fatal problems for the pups. So just verify what colors,if any are not safe in the breed to cross , are acceptable or dangerous.

    Temperament and train ability is another. How sound is she? Do both dogs conform to breed standard with good genetics and behaviors? You will want to know what genetic testing needs to be done before she is bored to ensure that she is healthy before and the puppies are on the right track. The Dad should also have these done. Akc has a list of the minimum recommended testings for each breed.

    I'm very careful now. We bought a farm pup, cross between two breeds who was totally healthy as we're his siblings and parents. We had an accidental litter and had no issues holding onto the pups until ten to twelve weeks, 8 is not recommended anymore they urge for 10 now to help them develop and mature better, until we found loving homes for them. Then the unthinkable happened. Right before the dad turned 2 he started having seizures. Right before the puppies turned one one started having seizures. Then two. Then three. It was a very rare form of epilepsy that was very aggressive and within only a couple months claimed three of the affected dogs lives. Testing is so terribly important to rule out anything that can be awful for the new puppy parents in the long run. Unfortunately epilepsy is not exactly something to test for but it haunts me. We had no clue. No one did. We were very careful and did everything right. Quality foods. Nothing from china. Natural cleaners no chemicals. You name it. You also have to plan for what ifs.

    We had a vet on standby for possible c-section for our Dog because she was younger than two and her risks went way up for complications. That was $5000+. The vet visits and shots are also spend u per puppy. $90+ a shot here per puppy. Also a big thing is someone will need to be with her around the clock before she has them to ensure someone is there when she delivers in case any complications arise. There are many dangers for the dog and they don't stop at labor. As the puppies grow sometimes they will drain the mother of everything she has and you have to supplement mom with extra things to keep her healthy for the puppies. Many many things that are common but the basic knowledge books don't cover.

    The biggest thing is she should be minimum of 2 years old before breeding. And she should have all her genetic testing done beforehand as well.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2017