1. BYH Official Poll: What are the things that you should consider before buying herds?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  2. Learning colors and terms? - Discussion thread.
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Dismiss Notice
  4. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)
    Dismiss Notice

Calf Manna organic?

Discussion in 'Organic Husbandry - Goats' started by Shea Zellweger, Oct 28, 2018.

  1. Oct 28, 2018
    Shedinator

    Shedinator Exploring the pasture

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Hey y'all,

    We just got our first two goat doelings about 2 weeks ago, and they're a little under where I want them to be weight-wise (the larger is at 58 lbs by the hg*hg*l/300 calculation. I plan to scale her sons). I'd like to try and get at least one of them to breeding weight this season, and everywhere sends to be recommending Calf-Manna. Is there an organic equivalent supplement? Or am I basically going to have to count on hay+grain+successful breeding on the first try?
     
  2. Oct 28, 2018
    greybeard

    greybeard Herd Master Golden Herd Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2011
    Messages:
    4,464
    Likes Received:
    7,348
    Trophy Points:
    463
    Location:
    East Texas
    The quick answer is......Calf Manna is not "organic".
     
    Shea Zellweger likes this.
  3. Oct 28, 2018
    Shedinator

    Shedinator Exploring the pasture

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Thanks. I had deduced that already. Just wasn't sure if there was an organic alternative. According to USDA standards, I can't call any dairy product organic until the doe has been organic for 12 months, so it looks like one way or another I won't have 'organic' milk until 2020 unless I can find another way to gain those last few pounds or get really lucky with breeding.
     
  4. Oct 28, 2018
    farmerjan

    farmerjan True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2016
    Messages:
    1,392
    Likes Received:
    2,494
    Trophy Points:
    238
    Location:
    virginia
    Try researching Countryside Organic Feed in Waynesboro, Va. They are local to me, but I do know they are all about organic feed and supplements. I don't feed organic grain as I cannot afford it. We do however try to use as few chemicals as we possibly can on our hay ground and such. But we use commercial poultry litter and they are not fed organic feed so the litter is not organic. Still we use as few chemicals as we can on our land and in our operation. Organic is fine if you have a serious issue with chemical sensitivity, or other issues; but here it is as important that it be "homegrown, naturally raised " and other type things. People want to know the farmer, and how they do things.
    Understand that you cannot use any of the commercial wormers and such on your goats either, if you want to be "certified organic". Or any drugs of any sort if they got really sick.
    One thing I always try to impress on people.... if your child were very sick and the doctor said you needed to use "xyz" antibiotic to cure what ailed them, would you refuse? Or after that, once he is healthy again, is he a "lesser" child because he had been treated? Once you treat a dairy animal, it can no longer be used for production of "organic" milk. Have a dairy farmer that went organic. He has over the years had some cows get sick that had to be treated with antibiotics. Once they were "cured" and the with holding time was past, they had to leave the farm as they would never be able to qualify for organic milk. So in order to save a cows life from say a severe klebsiella mastitis infection, they treat it, and cure it, then have to cull the cow. He would send the cows to his cousin who was not organic, and who could continue to get some value out of the cow.
    And when did they change it to 12 months? Used to be that it was 3 years of all organic feed for the milk to be organic, but once antibiotics were used, the milk could not be called organic. Well, you could wait 3 more years again.... but let's face it, that is not practical. And the animal could not be slaughtered as organic once it has had any antibiotic in it's system, ever.
    Maybe the standards have changed since I researched it.
    Do you have a source of both certified organic feed and HAY there in Ct.? If the hay person uses any type of commercial fertilizer, or things like commercial poultry litter, then it is not organic.