Egg endurance versus species question?

Nao57

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So...it takes geese eggs longer to hatch than duck eggs. And duck eggs take longer to hatch than chickens, and those longer than quail etc.

I was curious if this also means if there's a corresponding endurance to decay by egg species type that corresponds with the longer times that it takes for them to sit and hatch?

What do you think?

In theory, it could mean that duck and geese eggs would decay slower than chicken eggs... etc (?)
 

Nao57

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Well part of why I brought this up...

(I should have worded this better.)

A number of people in my family including me but also my parents noticed that it was very difficult to open up the duck eggs. They were used to opening chicken eggs. And the first few times when someone tries to crack open duck eggs is kind of funny actually because they are like, 'what the heck? What is with this thing?'

Anyway. This behavior made me think that its possible the duck eggs being more durable than the chicken eggs may also be a bonus for people who haven't considered raising ducks before. It seems that many people underestimate the good traits that ducks have. This is a bit sad actually.

And I haven't really tested this yet, but it seems like if the duck eggs have a slightly thicker shell that maybe they also have more resistance to freezing in winter also? What do you think about this?

If they are slightly more resistant to freezing over chicken eggs then that is a positive thing for winter like now when its cold.

Right now my ducks have slowed down laying, but not stopped entirely. So far I haven't seen any frozen eggs yet. But I don't have my chickens anymore because my sister needed them. (This has me curious what's going on with how often others see frozen eggs and the comparison of numbers on frozen eggs for ducks versus chickens.)
 

Mini Horses

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The shells develop thicker for many reasons but mostly to be durable to the adult handling and sitting in them. So "normal" for the animal can be altered by such as poor nutrition as in low calcium, proteins, etc.
 

messybun

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Duck eggs do last a bit longer than chicken eggs, they have a thicker shell and membrane. I have no clue about geese though, I have two wonderful ganders🤣.
 

nuthatched

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A duck egg will freeze along with the chicken egg if it's cold enough for things to freeze. The thickness of the shell won't prevent it from feeezing, if you have the best insulation available in your house, your pipes can still freeze if there's no internal heat source to make the house warmer than outside.
Eggs go bad from improper storage, if they're washed, which removes a thin layer of sealer that helps prevent bacteria from entering the egg through its pores. ( that's also why you don't wash eggs for the incubator, those Temps are fantastic for bacterial growth)
Duck eggs are water resistant, since ducks are often wet, which may also resist external bodies to a degree, so they might also loose less moisture over time so you may have a point. . But internal decay will still happen if the eggs are kept at room temperature for a while. (Weeks)
I think the the thicker the shell, the heavier the species/breed bird that layed it. Also diet and health play a factor
 

Nao57

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Duck eggs do last a bit longer than chicken eggs, they have a thicker shell and membrane. I have no clue about geese though, I have two wonderful ganders🤣.

salutes to the ganders. XD
 

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