Goat jumping fences

Mini Horses

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Something to consider...

Grazing animals have a routine. They will usually follow the same migration each day. They have an "eating route", so to speak. When individuals find a new area, they like to revisit.

The 30 acre hay field across the street seems to have been added to these few of mine😕🥴. They never lay there, munch & return home.
 

blessedfarmgirl

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Something to consider...

Grazing animals have a routine. They will usually follow the same migration each day. They have an "eating route", so to speak. When individuals find a new area, they like to revisit.

The 30 acre hay field across the street seems to have been added to these few of mine😕🥴. They never lay there, munch & return home.
Her grazing route includes the barn to check if we've left any grain bins open.
 

Ridgetop

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any time I get the bug to get a cute goatie or two all I have to do is come and read about goat adventures here and that bug is smashed!
I don't know why everyone is complaining about goats jumping over their fences. We never had any goats jump out of pens even with our original 36" goat pen fencing! We had standard sized dairy goats and kept the bucks in a pen on the other side of the property. Their pen was only 48" high. Our perimeter fences were 5' high at the time.

Our first goats did open the latches on the pens and let themselves out. LOL Of course, we kept everyone in milk for 10 months and the last 2 months they were pretty big from pregnancy. However, we never had any trouble with any dry yearlings jumping out of any pens either.
 

Stephine

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I don't know why everyone is complaining about goats jumping over their fences. We never had any goats jump out of pens even with our original 36" goat pen fencing! We had standard sized dairy goats and kept the bucks in a pen on the other side of the property. Their pen was only 48" high. Our perimeter fences were 5' high at the time.

Our first goats did open the latches on the pens and let themselves out. LOL Of course, we kept everyone in milk for 10 months and the last 2 months they were pretty big from pregnancy. However, we never had any trouble with any dry yearlings jumping out of any pens either.
What breeds were they?
 

Mini Horses

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Some issues with jumping are terrain motivated/controlled.....what's on either side of fence. Lay of land, their perception. Similar to the double fence in/out controls.

Does in milk or young kids, they're less inclined at those times. So has been my experience. I'm on flat ground here....
 

Ridgetop

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All our goats were standard sized registered dairy goats. We mostly had Nubians for many years. Then my middle son added a herd of LaManchas. (The La Manchas used to bite the Nubian's ears. LOL) We also had Toggenburgs at first, but the milk was vile tasting, so we sold them. Another 4-H family gave us some Alpines, but we didn't like their milk as much as the Nubian and LaMancha.

My children showed them at every Fair and show we could get to, and those pens were only about 36"-42" high. No one tried to jump out. We sold out when the youngest boys went to college, and we had about 100 goats. Our goats were all bottle fed as kids, wore S-chain collars with stamped metal washers as ID tags, and were trained to lead on collars and leads. We could lead a group of 8 to the ring from the stalls at shows with no problem.

We did hear that people with dwarf breeds had trouble with their goats jumping onto stuff, including their cars.

We had goats for 18 years. Raised my family on goat's milk.
 

Stephine

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All our goats were standard sized registered dairy goats. We mostly had Nubians for many years. Then my middle son added a herd of LaManchas. (The La Manchas used to bite the Nubian's ears. LOL) We also had Toggenburgs at first, but the milk was vile tasting, so we sold them. Another 4-H family gave us some Alpines, but we didn't like their milk as much as the Nubian and LaMancha.

My children showed them at every Fair and show we could get to, and those pens were only about 36"-42" high. No one tried to jump out. We sold out when the youngest boys went to college, and we had about 100 goats. Our goats were all bottle fed as kids, wore S-chain collars with stamped metal washers as ID tags, and were trained to lead on collars and leads. We could lead a group of 8 to the ring from the stalls at shows with no problem.

We did hear that people with dwarf breeds had trouble with their goats jumping onto stuff, including their cars.

We had goats for 18 years. Raised my family on goat's milk.
It’s funny how a small breed somehow seems like they would be easier to handle, but they are much bouncier… Maybe we’ll get some Nubians one day… I would love to have Guernsey goats, but they are not easy to find and I am not sure if they are likely to stay put or not. My hubby loves his garden, also loves goats, but I am afraid that love wouldn’t last three seconds if they attacked his garden…
 

blessedfarmgirl

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All this is really interesting. It seems odd to me how some people with the exact same breed of goat will have different problems or no problems. I have heard stories of standards jumping 60 inch fencing as well as standards who stayed in less than 4 foot fencing. I wonder if it has to do with genetics or the environment, or how the goat was raised, or all 3.
 
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