Goats and Types of Hay

TXMissy

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True, animals can be picky... no reason to buy a bunch if they won't eat it.

Also.... if you can buy just one to start, you can see how clean the hay is (nasty weeds, sandy, dirty), or of it is moldy in the middle.

Then you know if you want to buy more of that same lot.
Okay thank you. It is so much cheaper for coastal...we are talking 8.00 vs. 24.00 for timothy hay.
 

Alaskan

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Okay thank you. It is so much cheaper for coastal...we are talking 8.00 vs. 24.00 for timothy hay.
Yeah.... I see no reason for you to pay more just for Timothy hay. Do make sure the coastal is good. Cruddier hay is fine for the wether, or a dry doe.

But for a pregnant doe you want nice leafy green hay. And yes, some pellets every day. You being in Texas might be able to find pellets formulated for pregnant does. Alfalfa pellets are also a good way to up protein and nutrition. However, if you find "pregnant/milking doe" pellets, you probably don't need the alfalfa.

When she kids and starts milking you might then want to add some grain as well.


Also... being pregnant, make sure your loose minerals are good quality. I like adding a free feeder of powdered kelp meal when they are pregnant. Also, I like giving them a Calcium/magnesium supplement a week or two before kidding.
 

TXMissy

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Yeah.... I see no reason for you to pay more just for Timothy hay. Do make sure the coastal is good. Cruddier hay is fine for the wether, or a dry doe.

But for a pregnant doe you want nice leafy green hay. And yes, some pellets every day. You being in Texas might be able to find pellets formulated for pregnant does. Alfalfa pellets are also a good way to up protein and nutrition. However, if you find "pregnant/milking doe" pellets, you probably don't need the alfalfa.

When she kids and starts milking you might then want to add some grain as well.


Also... being pregnant, make sure your loose minerals are good quality. I like adding a free feeder of powdered kelp meal when they are pregnant. Also, I like giving them a Calcium/magnesium supplement a week or two before kidding.
Holy moly...okay. i do have some alfalfa pellets already. I will also see if they have any for her specifically. I have no idea when she is going to kid so it makes it a little difficult to plan anything. I will see what all I can find to give her.
Thanks so much!
 

Kristie

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I have two Nigerian Dwarfs and they LOVE peanut hay. If I can't get peanut, I get Timothy/Alfalfa mix. Not their favorite, but they will eat it.

I use coastal for bedding in their barn and occasionally scatter it in their yard when it's getting muddy. They will eat a piece here and there, but they don't make a meal out of it!
 

TXMissy

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I have two Nigerian Dwarfs and they LOVE peanut hay. If I can't get peanut, I get Timothy/Alfalfa mix. Not their favorite, but they will eat it.

I use coastal for bedding in their barn and occasionally scatter it in their yard when it's getting muddy. They will eat a piece here and there, but they don't make a meal out of it!
We dont have those here. At least not near me.
 

Ridgetop

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You will do best switching to Coastal based on the price. There is little difference between Timothy and Coastal to why pay 3x as much? Coastal is the commonest hay available in TX. Alfalfa us the highest hay i protein level BUT don't get any local TX alfalfa since alfalfa gets blister beetle in TX and can be toxic. It is also expensive since it is imported from other states. Using Alfalfa pellets to increase the protein and calcium levels in what you are feeding is a good idea. You can also use grain but I would make the decision based on availability and cost compared to the benefit in increased protein levels.

I can tell you this -- it takes more nutrients to produce milk than to grow a fetus.

If you plan to breed the does, you will need to make sure they are getting enough protein in their diets to produce healthy kids and during lactation If you plan to continue milking for house milk, the ratio is 1 lb of grain to 1 lb of milk produced. A gallon of milk is commonly held to weigh 8 lbs, however that weight can vary based on the butterfat content. Higher butterfat content weighs lighter.
 

TXMissy

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You will do best switching to Coastal based on the price. There is little difference between Timothy and Coastal to why pay 3x as much? Coastal is the commonest hay available in TX. Alfalfa us the highest hay i protein level BUT don't get any local TX alfalfa since alfalfa gets blister beetle in TX and can be toxic. It is also expensive since it is imported from other states. Using Alfalfa pellets to increase the protein and calcium levels in what you are feeding is a good idea. You can also use grain but I would make the decision based on availability and cost compared to the benefit in increased protein levels.



If you plan to breed the does, you will need to make sure they are getting enough protein in their diets to produce healthy kids and during lactation If you plan to continue milking for house milk, the ratio is 1 lb of grain to 1 lb of milk produced. A gallon of milk is commonly held to weigh 8 lbs, however that weight can vary based on the butterfat content. Higher butterfat content weighs lighter.
Thank you 😊
 

Wild Bug Ranch

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Hello Ya'll!
I recently read an article about different types of hay for goats however, I am in TX and the most common type of hay is Coastal. Does anyone out there feed their goats coastal hay? Right now I am paying a lot on compressed Timothy hay. I would like to switch to Coastal. Any advice? I only have 2 goats, one is a pregnant female and they are pets. We are not eating them or using them for milk. Just using them as weed wackers. 😁

Thanks!
are they both girls or is the one pregnant just the only girl?

Don't feed boys any alfalfa as it causes urnianry stones....
 

Wild Bug Ranch

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Hello Ya'll!
I recently read an article about different types of hay for goats however, I am in TX and the most common type of hay is Coastal. Does anyone out there feed their goats coastal hay? Right now I am paying a lot on compressed Timothy hay. I would like to switch to Coastal. Any advice? I only have 2 goats, one is a pregnant female and they are pets. We are not eating them or using them for milk. Just using them as weed wackers. 😁

Thanks!
are they both girls or is the one pregnant just the only girl?

Don't feed boys any alfalfa as it causes urnianry stones...
 

rachels.haven

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Don't feed boys any alfalfa as it causes urnianry stones...
(being a heel here) That alfalfa thing is a myth. The boys need at least a 2:1 calcium to phosphorus ratio, with a little more calcium okay (with sky high calcium bad). The balance is the key. Running a hay analysis and reading feed tags can help you out there if concerned. Grain and a lot of grass hays are high on the phosphorus and low on the calcium helping to precipitate it. Adding a small amount of alfalfa pellets and making sure to feed a balanced grain goes miles. Some bucks live exclusively on alfalfa and are fine. Mine are sometimes some of them depending on what's available and they are doing okay.
 
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