Hi Everybody

bggrant2

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So appreciative for the wisdom and guidance on this thread! Not discouraged at all. That's why I wanted to be a part of this community - so I could learn and have fun while farming and not hurt myself! A HUGE THANK YOU to YOU!
 

SageHill

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I am so grateful to be a part of this community. I am a new and beginning farmer located in Chenango Forks, NY. I currently have two elderly meat goats that I inherited from the former owners. I am interested in raising organic dairy cows (Guernsey or Jersey), organic dairy goats, organic sheep, organic chickens, and growing organic fruits and vegetables.

Right now, I am researching which dairy cow breeds work well in upstate New York. I am interested in A2/A2 genetics.
Wow -- 'tis alot on your plate! But then - what the heck :) . I don't know if organic standards are the same from state to state, but 'tis definitely a huge added "layer" of bio-security. I'm in So Cal, here it literally starts at the gate with a tire wash. Since you'll be working with Cornell you'll have strong mentors there.
Looking forward to reading and seeing more!
 

Baymule

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Worms are just there. Livestock, wild animals, all carry parasites. Goats and sheep share the same parasites. Cattle carry tapeworms that are transmissible to sheep and goats, but their other worms and parasites are different. Graze the sheep, rotate them to another pasture. Wait three to 4 weeks, then graze the cows. They will eat the worm larva from the sheep, breaking the cycle. Likewise follow the cattle with the sheep. They eat the grass with the cattle worm larva. Animals drop worm eggs in their manure. It takes about 3 weeks for the eggs to hatch, the larva crawl up the grass to be eaten and keep the cycle going. Cross grazing species isn’t perfect but it helps.

There is lots of valuable information on this forum. I was a member here for 5 years before I got sheep. I used that time to read the posts in this forum and ask questions. My advice, pick an animal, then pick a topic and read the posts. Then the next topic. Study the different breeds, ask questions.

Get one type of animal at a time and don’t overload yourself.
 

canesisters

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AI it is! Thanks for the confirmation. I hear you about friends! I have a couple old machines - an old Craftsman Tractor and an old ATV with a brushhog.

I have no experience with farming/livestock. I plan to take your advice and take it slow! Thank you for the words of encouragement re: small farms!
Have you done anything with raw milk before?
I tend to be a bit of a scardy-cat & don't enjoy 'big scary risk taking' so when I decided to jump into the backyard dairy cow thing I went with a half dairy/half beef cow. My plan was that if I decided that the whole dairy thing wasn't for me, I'd still be able to let my cow raise a single beef calf every year (worked out to be every other year).
I enjoy being a milk maid for a few months right after Eva freshens - then get to give it up, sleep in & enjoy homegrown beef.
It's a wonderful experience that becomes a lifestyle.
 

bggrant2

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I've not done anything with raw milk before. I love your plan! One dairy farmer recommended I do the same thing actually. She was saying that beef cattle could also help me graze some of the pastures on the land that the dairy cattle may not graze until it's better suited for them.
 

Finnie

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Welcome!

I’m looking forward to following your progress. I hope you post a lot!

I too have spent years reading on here so that someday when I get my “real farm”, I will be equipped with the knowledge of how to manage it. (Even if I never have any animals other than poultry.) There is a TON to be learned here, and the members are so helpful to new people. ❤️
 

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