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DellaMyDarling

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Here's what I've got going on for bird setup.

The plan is to erect timber framing around the chain link kennels, use the timbers to support framing over the kennels for metal roofing sheets.
Very temporary tarp erected over one run.
She's a big hot mess, but work in progress.

So, now you can see it, does it still seem possible to hang rabbit cages in these runs? Imagining several wood beams going across the kennels for the roof support, I'm thinking that's what I could hang the rabbit cages from. I have never seen a hanging cage, I'll have to Google it.
 

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Baymule

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You need to build the roof high enough to walk in. If I get this right, you mean to enclose the timber frame with the kennel panels. Basically, build a barn with a walk-in high roof, use the panels to predator proof it.

You will need at least one solid wall to block winter wind. You want to keep the sun from beaming in on them. In the summer they can overheat and die from heat stroke. You can cover the outside walls from the top down, level with the bottom of the cages, then wire from there to the ground. That will keep the sun off them. You need the wire at the bottom for ventilation. You can cover it in the winter if your winters are severe. The front panel and the gate would be great, put it on the south side, the sun rises in the east, sets in the west, and the cold winter wind comes from the north.

Instead of building your barn to fit the kennel, build the barn to fit your needs and use the panels where possible. You will be a lot happier with the results.

Where do you live, general location? You can add that to your avatar. Knowing your climate would help in advising you on building your barn.
 

DellaMyDarling

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We will not be able to move any kennel panels, they're staying put. A timber frame will be erected on the outside to make support for a roof.
I'm thinking maybe two cages in one run and three in the other. Five, yea? For a breeding trio? Gives a grow out or two or grow out and extra or...

Knowing the buns need side shelter as well, some cages could be against the barn wall in that currently tarped run, then I can add siding around as needed. The currently not covered run we'll need to be more creative, but that's what our scrap pile and the Mister's brain is for! I don't imagine things well, he's the resident engineer.
 

Pastor Dave

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The main thing to remember on rabbits is out of the wind and dry. A rabbit does pretty good in winter wearing its fur coat as long as you can keep it dry and keep the wind off them. A cold, wet rabbit is a dead rabbit. I mentioned before, a wooden box with drainage holes for the bottom, like a nest box, with straw to burrough in does great for single rabbits. A meat pen gets body heat from each other.

In the summer, air movement is beneficial. Use 2 or 3 liter bottles with water. Leave room for expansion and freeze. A fur coat in summer is bad. I give mine the frozen bottles if it hits abt 90degs or I see them panting. A floor tile that's been refrigerated or frozen helps to lie on too.

Try to keep them in cool water for hot months. I use 32oz water bottles. Some use crocks and put in ice cubes. It gets dirtier a lot faster. In winter, they need thawed water at least twice a day. That may be as often as a wild rabbit drinks. I try to shoot for giving them thawed water mid day too. I usually just swap out with extra bottles from the house.

That should be enough to do ya for a while :old
 

Ron Bequeath

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Had rabbits in Ohio zone 5a and zone 5b,6a and have rabbits in zone 5b,6a in Pennsylvania. Always kept them outside seem to be more comfortable that way and being cooler could breed them all times of the year. Just keep drafts down in the winter and lots of hay and they seem to do great.
 

GypsyG

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I raise mostly meatmutts, but standard chinchilla rabbits keep my rabbitry bills paid. They are laid back and calm, enjoy attention, don't require near as much feed to get them to butcher weight as Newzealands, have great meat to bone ratio and high quality pelts. I don't know about where you are from, but here in MO, I have no problem getting $45 for an 8 week old kit, or $65 for any over 16 weeks old.
 
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