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Normal or abnormal?

Discussion in 'Behaviors & Handling Techniques - Goats' started by Alexz7272, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. Jan 4, 2017
    farmerjan

    farmerjan Loving the herd life

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    Besides the possibility of an odor, there may have been something lurking around that made them feel like they could be trapped if they went inside the shelters. As for the goats, they may have felt safer to be out with the rest of "their herd". Were they shivering and looking like they were uncomfortable? They looked pretty laid back in the pictures....You may never know what their reasoning was to be outside. You may have to put up a game camera or 2 to see if there is something stalking the area at night to see if there is a "reason" for unusual behaviour. Can you move the shelters? are they on skids? I would thing that if there is an odor problem that you could move them to "new ground" if they are moveable, then bed them. If not them putting down lime or and odor kill would help. We have always used ag lime for odor problems and to just sweeten the ground. We would clean out and then put down the lime and leave it open for the day then bed late in the afternoon so it had a chance to air out. Don't know much about the newer type products.
     
  2. Jan 4, 2017
    norseofcourse

    norseofcourse Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    I don't know anything about goats, and you've been given good advice about possible reasons, but just an observation: I see snow on the backs of all the animals, and that means they're so well insulated that not even enough of their body heat is escaping to melt that snow. I see that on my sheep and ponies all the time (seen it on deer, too). So that's a good thing :)