On a Knitting Kick.....

Kusanar

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Knotting each stitch sounds like a much slower method of construction than knitting or crochet. But once done it will stay done, that's a good thing.

I use Hula Bunny yarn for most projects since it's the yarn using the wool from our bunnies. It felts since it's an angora/Merino/silk mix and the Merino isn't superwash. Which means it doesn't come apart when anything gets a hole in it since the fibers kind of become one after awhile. I'll 'fuller' woven items which is kind of a deliberate felting and that makes it a fabric that doesn't unravel.

Does the Jacob fiber felt? Once your bag was done, it could be hand washed in hot soapy water to felt it a bit and make it even more unlikely to ever unravel.

How are you spinning the yarn if it's only in 3 to 6 foot long pieces? Or is using a short piece of yarn part of the nalbinding process?
The jacob does felt, which is a good thing for doing spit splicing.

Nalbinding uses a 3-6 foot piece of yarn on a large needle to sew in each stitch, longer yarn is more likely to tangle (especially if you overspin it... oops) and be a pain so lots of shorter lengths are used especially when starting out. There are special nalbinding needles that have 2 holes so you can put the tail of your yarn through the other hole and drag more through each time but again, it can tangle easier.

I'm hand spinning it on a drop spindle, doing about 10-15 yards at a time since I am breaking it into smaller pieces to use it anyway I can just spin for a few minutes and stop without having to worry about lost of small pieces because they will be lots of small pieces anyway.
 

Niele da Kine

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I was wondering if nalbinding is anything like macrame? That pretty much knots things together? Maybe macrame is the crochet version of nalbinding? Kinda knitting/crochet and nalbinding/macrame?

I should look up spit splicing. Usually, I'll just overlap the ends of the yarn for a few inches when changing yarn while knitting or weaving. Maybe that's spit splicing without the spit?

It sounds as if spindle spinning and nalbinding work really well together! I wonder if one developed from another?
 

Kusanar

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I was wondering if nalbinding is anything like macrame? That pretty much knots things together? Maybe macrame is the crochet version of nalbinding? Kinda knitting/crochet and nalbinding/macrame?

I should look up spit splicing. Usually, I'll just overlap the ends of the yarn for a few inches when changing yarn while knitting or weaving. Maybe that's spit splicing without the spit?

It sounds as if spindle spinning and nalbinding work really well together! I wonder if one developed from another?
I am doing the oslo stitch (
) the link seems to be a decent tutorial but I'm at work so no sound, no idea if it's even in english.

To spit splice you pull the yarn apart, do not cut, you want the ragged floofy edges, then put the 2 floofy edges together overlapping, then get the floof wet (spit or water, either works) and roll it between your hands, the moisture and friction and the heat caused by the friction will felt the 2 ends together, I roll it together until it looks good, gently tug, if it moves, then I roll it a bunch more and tug again, eventually it is as strong in that spot as the rest of the yarn.

Spindle spinning and nalbinding are both ancient ways of getting stuff done. Spindles are a lot easier to make than a wheel, so they are the older method of doing things. Nalbinding is "the way the vikings made their socks" it is what the world did before knitting was invented and I'm pretty sure knitting is older than crochet. Apparently when knitting started becoming more commonplace the deal was that if you were making something for someone you really cared about, you would nalbind it because the quality is better and the extra work invested really shows you care. If you are just making something for someone you don't care a lot for, you would knit it because it is so much faster and easier.
 

Niele da Kine

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Oh dear! Now I have to learn nalbinding to make socks for my friend? She's lucky to get them knit, I should be working on some socks for her now, I'm sure her other pairs are worn out by now.

The speakers went out on this desktop 'puter ages ago so I can't hear stuff unless I cast it to the TV anyway. Which worked until this new TV showed up and it doesn't seem to like my old 'puter so soundless may be my fate until I get some speakers for the 'puter.
 

Kusanar

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Oh dear! Now I have to learn nalbinding to make socks for my friend? She's lucky to get them knit, I should be working on some socks for her now, I'm sure her other pairs are worn out by now.

The speakers went out on this desktop 'puter ages ago so I can't hear stuff unless I cast it to the TV anyway. Which worked until this new TV showed up and it doesn't seem to like my old 'puter so soundless may be my fate until I get some speakers for the 'puter.
I can't even imagine knitting socks... ugh! lol

Have you seen the authentic Viking socks? They make me laugh.

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Bruce

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Whoever wore those socks had really narrow feet with REALLY long toes.
 
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