Please Help, Aggressive Pyrenees.

Baymule

Herd Master
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
28,172
Reaction score
77,453
Points
853
Location
East Texas
I am truly sad for you and your dog. I know this is hard and it doesn’t look to get any better. She will not like the muzzle and once she sees you with it, she could bite you. I wouldn’t use a muzzle, that’s just me. It is not a training aid, it is punishment. She isn’t stupid, she will figure that out real quick. Be honest with yourself, do you truly have enough control over her to put it on her when she hates it? Please be careful. If she growls at you-her person, then it’s time to say goodbye.
 

Blue Sky

True BYH Addict
Joined
Jul 3, 2015
Messages
734
Reaction score
1,751
Points
293
I wish I had an easy answer for you. First I don’t believe a muzzle of any kind will solve your problems except when the dog is being examined or in close quarters with people. Muzzles restrict breathing and prevent eating and drinking. If you can’t contain her and she escapes wearing a muzzle she will likely damage herself tearing it off. This dog’s future depends on containment. For her safety and for all around her. Keep us posted.
 

CaliFarmsAR

Loving the herd life
Joined
Dec 31, 2021
Messages
205
Reaction score
287
Points
123
Location
Arkansas
I am truly sad for you and your dog. I know this is hard and it doesn’t look to get any better. She will not like the muzzle and once she sees you with it, she could bite you. I wouldn’t use a muzzle, that’s just me. It is not a training aid, it is punishment. She isn’t stupid, she will figure that out real quick. Be honest with yourself, do you truly have enough control over her to put it on her when she hates it? Please be careful. If she growls at you-her person, then it’s time to say goodbye.
It’s definitely hard. She wouldn’t attack me, I know that for sure, it others I’m concerned about. I will be talking to my parents and see what the think of everything.
 

Youngfarmer2019

Loving the herd life
Joined
Nov 22, 2022
Messages
167
Reaction score
366
Points
113
Location
Northwestern NC
I wish I had an easy answer for you. First I don’t believe a muzzle of any kind will solve your problems except when the dog is being examined or in close quarters with people. Muzzles restrict breathing and prevent eating and drinking. If you can’t contain her and she escapes wearing a muzzle she will likely damage herself tearing it off. This dog’s future depends on containment. For her safety and for all around her. Keep us posted.
Properly fitting muzzles should not restrict breathing but I do agree that if she’s being aggressive to use it only in close quarters…BUT this is why I suggested the no pull head halter, it does not restrict any breathing and allows for drinking freely. we’ve had great success with it (though it may not be the solution for everyone) I suggest treats (healthy ones to avoid weight gain) at any and every positive interaction she has with any people and animals, muzzle only if you deem the situation unsafe.
 

CaliFarmsAR

Loving the herd life
Joined
Dec 31, 2021
Messages
205
Reaction score
287
Points
123
Location
Arkansas
Properly fitting muzzles should not restrict breathing but I do agree that if she’s being aggressive to use it only in close quarters…BUT this is why I suggested the no pull head halter, it does not restrict any breathing and allows for drinking freely. we’ve had great success with it (though it may not be the solution for everyone) I suggest treats (healthy ones to avoid weight gain) at any and every positive interaction she has with any people and animals, muzzle only if you deem the situation unsafe.
Thank you 😊
 

jambi1214

Loving the herd life
Joined
Feb 11, 2021
Messages
129
Reaction score
197
Points
123
Location
Southeast Missouri
We have very similar problems and our lastest put Pyrenees mix almost killed my senior dog and did kill our cat so I know how real and scary this is. Tons of great suggestions mentioned. Maybe contact the vet to try some behavioral medications. There are tons of options out there for those but it goes hand in hand with training.
I learned in dog training school to never use aggression for aggression. But really focusing on other things like commands helps. If you use a muzzle start with short sessions of dog wearing it with positive reinforcement or the dog will associate it with bad things.
 

Ridgetop

Herd Master
Joined
Mar 13, 2015
Messages
4,435
Reaction score
13,416
Points
553
Location
Shadow Hills, CA
I recommend this book. Brenda Negri was a member here, I think she had an illness , she disappeared. I’m dumbfounded by the price of this book, on Amazon it was $192. I found a used one for $25. I have a copy and while I don’t agree with everything she said, there is much to be gleaned from her years of experience.
Brenda's book is still available for $27.00 on Amazon. (I saw the ad for $192 which is ridiculous) It is based on the trans-humance way of shepherding. This is leading out the flock to grazing and returning at night or staying out in open grazing with the sheep and dogs. For this type of sheepherding you need a larger number of dogs that coexist and work as a pack. No fences are involved because this type of sheep raising takes place on open rangeland. Many older Basques in Bakersfield, CA, still use this type of grazing in the mountains on forestry leased land. This is also the type of grazing @SageHill does with her herding/guardian dogs.

Brenda's book is very good as it focuses on learning to read your dogs, understanding the tones of their barking, understanding the ways LGDs work that often puzzle us until we understand what they are doing and why, and how to train them using their own natural reactions to livestock and dangers. I enjoyed it and learned a lot. She also discusses her use of several different breeds of LGDs and how they work in different ways. Brenda is battling some severe health problems. She is also working on another book about her experiences working on large ranches, etc.

With regard to your dog and her escalating aggression, I would seriously consider putting her down. If you do not choose to do this, she should be confined in a kennel run on concrete with a top from which she cannot escape. Since fences won't hold her (Pyrs are escape artists) a kennel with top and bottom is your only choice.

Allowing an aggressive dog to run loose is asking for a serious problem to occur when she encounters someone and bites them. Since you know that she is becoming more aggressive means that you have no defense if she attacks someone. At that point the authorities will put her down for you, and you will be responsible for any damage to people, animals, etc. that she causes.

Since she has been with you 5 years and was previously OK with your sister and the animals she was used to protect, putting her down would be the best solution. She might have a brain tumor or other illness which could be causing this behavior but since you can't afford a vet visit and any necessary surgery or medications for whatever is causing this new dangerous behavior the best solution is to painlessly euthanize her before she injures someone severely.

As animal owners we all need to remember that we not only have a responsibility to our animals to provide them with a healthy life and proper care, but to face the inevitable when it comes. This means putting an animal down painlessly when they are in uncurable pain, illness, or become a danger to others and/or themselves. It sounds like your dog has reached that point.
 
Top