Ram acting drunk

Mike CHS

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mysunwolf

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Donna R. Raybon

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That is 'thorn apple' also called Jimson Weed and in superstition well known as a component of witch's brew that helps a witch to fly.
Yes, you will trip if you eat or get enough of it on your skin from pulling it up. Quite toxic and years ago someone thought the would graft tomato onto root stock to help with frost damage resistance. Both are in the same family. But, tomato was toxic and at least one person died. Datura stramonium is scientific name. Usually animals won't eat it.
 

greybeard

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I went out here today to let the ram out and he seems to be doing better. It kind of frustrates me because I don't know what was wrong with him. If I don't know what's wrong with him then I don't know how to prevent it ou treat it. I don't know if it was poison and it worked its way through its system. I tried finding Activated charcoal around here but apparently that's something that needs to be purchased online. Perhaps it was only a mild poison. I don't know, it may have been a concussion. You have to remember this is the ram who burst his way through the Barnwood to get out of the stall. I reinforced all of the barn where he is so maybe he tried again and knocked himself silly.

When I was outside letting them out I did come across a new flower in my pasture. I don't know what type of flower is but here's a pic of it.View attachment 49352
I suppose I should have refreshed the page from earlier today before posting, as you already have your answer.


That looks very very much like Jimson weed, both in the bloom and leaves.
I've had some here before, came in with some hay. After the bloom, you will see some thorny/spiny looking seed pods, and within each, are lots of seeds.
jimsonpod.jpg

You need to get rid of it before it goes to seed and the seed pods dry, then turn brown and hard and burst open. They are easy to pull up most of the time if the soil is even a little bit loose. Collect the plants, and burn them, but do not inhale the smoke..
Once the seed pods burst, Jimson is hard to get rid of as the seeds are very long lived. Glyphosate will kill it, but you need to act before it seeds out. tropane alkaloids are the same toxic agent that makes belladonna toxic.
Jimsonweed Toxicity

All parts of Jimsonweed are poisonous. Leaves and seeds are the usual source of poisoning, but are rarely eaten do to its strong odor and unpleasant taste. Poisoning can occur when hungry animals are on sparse pasture with Jimsonweed infestation. Most animal poisoning results from feed contamination. Jimsonweed can be harvested with hay or silage, and subsequently poisoning occurs upon feeding the forage. Seeds can contaminate grains and is the most common poisoning which occurs in chickens.

Poisoning is more common in humans than in animals. Children can be attracted by flowers and consume Jimsonweed accidentally. In small quantities, Jimsonweed can have medicinal or haulucinagenic properties, but poisoning readily occurs because of misuse. Ingestion of Jimsonweed caused the mass poisoning of soldiers in Jamestown, Virginia in 1676.

Jimsonweed toxicity is caused by tropane alkaloids. The total alkaloid content in the plant can be as high as 0.7%. The toxic chemicals are atropine, hyoscine (also called scopolamine), and hyoscyamine.

Clinical Signs of Jimsonweed Poisoning

Jimsonweed poisoning occurs in most domesticated production animals: Cattle, goats, horses, sheep, swine, and poultry. Human poisoning occurs more frequently than livestock poisoning making jimsonweed unusual among most poisonous plants.

Early Signs:

  • rapid pulse
  • restlessness
  • polydipsia
  • depression
  • rapid breathing
  • nervousness
  • dilated pupils
  • muscular twitching
  • frequent urination
  • diarrhea
  • anorexia
  • weight loss
Fatal Cases:

  • weak pulse
  • irregular breathing
  • lower body temperature
  • coma
  • retained urine
  • convulsions
 
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Bo Peep Soays

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I went out here today to let the ram out and he seems to be doing better. It kind of frustrates me because I don't know what was wrong with him. If I don't know what's wrong with him then I don't know how to prevent it ou treat it. I don't know if it was poison and it worked its way through its system. I tried finding Activated charcoal around here but apparently that's something that needs to be purchased online. Perhaps it was only a mild poison. I don't know, it may have been a concussion. You have to remember this is the ram who burst his way through the Barnwood to get out of the stall. I reinforced all of the barn where he is so maybe he tried again and knocked himself silly.

When I was outside letting them out I did come across a new flower in my pasture. I don't know what type of flower is but here's a pic of it.View attachment 49352
That plant is in the Night Shade family, and is poisonous.
 

Anthony Sr.

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Well when I first saw the purple stem, Poke-Weed came to mind, but then I saw them flowers. That lost me there, cause I usually don't let my poke-weed get that tall = it becomes Poke-salad :D:drool:drool
 
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