Ringo has Moved to TEXAS 2-28-19 to 2-6-23 Goodbye Dear Friend

Baymule

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This was last year in March. One moment she was playing in the dirt, the next moment she was climbing a cow panel to get to the Sheep.

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Seconds after I took this picture, the wether knocked her on her butt.

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So excited to be with the sheep!

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She fist bumped the ewes and scared them to death. They ran, she ran right behind them, I ran to grab her.

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She was barely walking in this picture, but she could make it to the Sheep.

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I think I have a little shepherd girl.
 

Ridgetop

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Ringo looks nice and long, good length of loin. When are you putting him with your ewes for a lamb crop? Can you get a fall lambing in or is the weather too cold? Would you still have pasture? Do Katahdins breed and lamb year round like Dorpers and Dorsets?

Children that grow up from babies with animals are healthier. You have a couple of assistant shepherds coming along. Shearing those sheep shouldn't be hard since they are pretty tame. Lead them to the stanchion in a halter, lock them in with a handful of rabbit pellets or grain in a bucket every so often and you can shear easily. You just have to be careful with the clippers since the clipper blades on a sheep head would take off a little finger. Careless or ignorant shearers have ruined good ewes and bucks before. Since the hair sheep only get wool on the top and sides, you will not need to flip them. Flipping a sheep is not hard to learn, but sometimes needs a bit of strength. When my kids were in 4-H, all kids showing sheep had to know how to flip their lambs. Judges would make them flip their sheep in the showmanship class to see if they could do it. The kids had to learn how to put a leg under the belly and through the sheep's rear hooves, then flip the sheep into its rump for the judge. My kids had to do that from when they were 9 years old. Some of those little kids weighed less than their lambs and were flipping them in the ring like pros! I don't think the judges are making the kids do that anymore, at least the younger kids.

Do your grandchildren live close enough and in an area for 4-H when they turn 9 years old? They can do sheep then. Nothing like having Mawmaw and Pawpaw cheering in the stands and bidding on their animals! Can't wait till DS3's boys are old enough. DD1's older 2 are old enough but no more fair and no more 4-H here. We could put them in a club and travel 30 miles to the meetings and 60 miles to the fair. She is considering it since 4-H has so much more than livestock to offer. Maybe your daughter could find a 4-H club where she lives. Any work the kids do on your ranch for you they can put in their record book as experience.
 

Baymule

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@Ridgetop Katahdins breed year around. Thanks for the compliments on Ringo. I am so happy to have him.

I looked up 4-H,
4-H is a community of young people across America who are learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. Any youth may become a member of 4-H when he or she has reached 9 years of age, or 8 years of age and has entered the third grade. There is a program called Clover Kids that younger youth can participate in that allows them to experience 4-H through non-competitive, small project activities. They can register as a Clover Kid as long as they are in K-2nd grade. Their experience may vary from club to club based on what the club offers.

She is just 2 years old. Her 4 year old sister is our sparkly girly girl and is not interested in sheep, but she likes to paint chicken coops, pick in the garden and play in the sand. We have time yet to let the little one enjoy the sheep.
 

Ridgetop

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Lots of other things to do in 4-H besides livestock. Some of the best things for my kids were the presentations and public speaking opportunities, the clubs also offer all kinds of projects from cooking, sewing, shooting, rocketry, horses, dogs, pets, vet science, etc., etc., and of course, livestock. I thnk my kids did almost everything at one time or another! Clover can also do poultry and rabbits. Depending on your State rules, Clover kids can auction poultry and rabbit meat pens at the local fair. I agree that 2 and 4 are too young still, but helping Mawmaw with her sheep is a good introduction to loving animal husbandry. And, Bay, you will be teaching them to ride eventually!
 

Ridgetop

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I think the sheep and LGDs are so bonded that it is hard on the dogs when a flock member leaves. Our dogs check each sheep over each morning when they are released into the field - I know they are counting noses. Otherwise how would they know to stay behind and protect an injured sheep. Poor Maisie. Be careful Bay, she may remember you as a ram thief if you go back to visit! LOL
 

Baymule

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I was wondering how your LGD gets along with Ringo? Maisy has not been a happy camper since you took off with her best buddy but she is warming up to Max. :)

Paris peed all over his pasture, he belongs to her now. Trip nuzzled Ringo’s ears, Ringo was a bit standoffish, wondering just who is this dog whispering in my ear? Both dogs like him, he’ll warm up to them.

Eating the guinea’s corn together.

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Hanging out.

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