ruptured prepubic tendon in sheep

WolfeMomma

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This may sound insensitive, if it does, I apologize for it. Could you change the title of this thread to ruptured prepubic tendon in sheep? Reason being, if anyone is doing a search, they might find it and this could help someone else. I have no pictures of my ewe that we had to put down and my experience with it is buried in the pages of my lambing thread. I try to keep in mind what @Nifty said about thread titles and search engines making it easier for someone doing a search for something in particular.

When Sentry had femoral head ostectomy, I started a new thread for that reason. Maybe my misfortune can help someone else someday and give them hope for their dog.

Since this is something unusual that rarely happens, it might help someone else. Big hugs to you. How is your ewe today?
No problem, I will make sure to change the thread title. Well, yesterday she struggled to walk, she kept falling over. Its the most heart breaking thing to watch. I am going to send my vet a message today, with some pictures and ask her what to do. I will ask her how much the C-sections are because that might be our only option. We are prepared to do whatever we need to do in order to save those lambs. I have to at least try. Is there a way I can make her more comfortable in the mean time? I make sure she drinks, I hand feed her all her grain and bring her hay to where she is laying. I'm guessing there is no sheep pain killer?
 

Baymule

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You are putting up a good effort to make her comfortable and keeping her fed. Pain control? I don't know. Since this condition hit me on the blindside, I had no idea until the ewe was down. A C-section might be your best bet. You might try to milk out her colostrum prior to surgery, put it in the freezer. Just my opinion, she is probably waaaay off balance, thus why she keeps falling over.

Let us know what your vet says. :hugs
 

frustratedearthmother

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I've seen pics of folks putting a sling around the belly of animals with ruptured tendons - google has some good images. That might help her for awhile?

Google pic:

1609609155999.png
:
 

Ridgetop

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So sorry to hear this. Horrible diagnosis. :(:oops: Yes, it seems that only the best ones or most loved ones have problems. I hate losing animals whether they are house pets or livestock. And I hate seeing them suffer.

If she is due soon, and there is a danger that she might not be able to deliver normally or safely, you could check on having the vet do a C-section to save the lambs. Since you are particularly fond of this ewe, and value her exceptional bloodlines, etc., that would be the safest way to ensure the lambs survive.

You need to be sure to get some colostrum ready to hand - check with other sheep breeders in your area - goat colostrum will do and most dairy goat breeders keep a supply on hand in the freezer. If you have to travel to get the colostrum, do it now before she lambs so you have it ready. You can freeze it. Be careful warming it up since colostrum at simmering heat turns into a curd. Then get in some commercial formula - I recommend commercial formula because it has added vitamins and minerals specific for lambs. It can be ordered from Chewy and wi arrive in a couple of days. If you can get fresh goat milk, you can use that but maybe add some extra cream to it. Sheep milk has a lot more fat in the milk than either goat or cow milk.

I hate to say these things, but you probably know already why I am talking about bottle feeding these lambs. :hugs If this ewe does have a ruptured prepubic tendon her survival prognosis is grim. Having the feeding formula, colostrum and bottles ready in advance will give her lambs' a better chance at surviving the birth. At least you will have her bloodlines and sweet nature in those lambs.

So sorry. :hugs:fl
 

WolfeMomma

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The vet said she can come out monday afternoon. At this point, she is going down hill fast. I have been giving her Propylene glycol ( I don't know if i spelled that right) as per my conversation with the vet. She is starting to smell really bad. At this point I don't have a whole lot of hope for the ewe or lambs. But I am ready to raise lambs if needed. I cant reach her udder very well, she is always laying on it. So I dont know if I will be able to get the colostrum needed. Can I buy any as a back up? I have little to no experience in bottle feeding lambs :th
 

Baymule

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Is there anyone near you with goats? I have never bought colostrum. Maybe you could milk her out when the vet gets there? Call feedstores and ask if they have powdered colostrum like they have milk replacer.
 

Kusanar

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The vet said she can come out monday afternoon. At this point, she is going down hill fast. I have been giving her Propylene glycol ( I don't know if i spelled that right) as per my conversation with the vet. She is starting to smell really bad. At this point I don't have a whole lot of hope for the ewe or lambs. But I am ready to raise lambs if needed. I cant reach her udder very well, she is always laying on it. So I dont know if I will be able to get the colostrum needed. Can I buy any as a back up? I have little to no experience in bottle feeding lambs :th
Can you roll her onto her flat side (the side without the huge baby bump) and milk her while she is down? A sheep farmer on youtube that I watch often checks for milk on the mamas while they are still down after lambing (sometimes between lambs) and she just kind of lifts the hind leg and reaches under. I understand it will be awkward to try to actually milk her that way but it may be possible to get enough.

I found this link: Here that states:
"Each newborn lamb should have its first suckle within 30 minutes and never later than 12 – 14 hours after lambing.

Newborn lambs should receive at a minimum an amount of colostrum equaling to at least 5% of its body weight (Some sources recommend about double this amount– 10 % of body weight) spread over 2 or 3 feeding during the first 12 hours of life. For example, a 10 pound lamb (160 oz.) should receive 8 oz of colostrum over 2 to 3 feedings within the first 12 – 14 hours of life. It is generally not recommended to give a lamb over 5 or 6 ounces at any one feeding."

It also says that if sheep colostrum cannot be found then goat or cow can be used.

I also found packaged colostrum replacement here: Link which says that you should feed 3 times in the first 18 hours of life and that the package will provide 9 feedings so up to triplets which should be fine to buy 1 bag.
 

Ridgetop

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Hope she holds out till the vet comes. :fl

With the smell, I sure hope that the lambs are still alive. If you are confident they are still alive and have reached the conclusion that this ewe is terminal, you can put her down yourself and cut her open to take the lambs. This is a last ditch effort that is usually done when the ewe can't give birth normally and is dying anyway. You have to work FAST to get the lambs out before they suffocate. Be sure to have several strong stomached helpers with you to do this since without the normal birth contractions each lamb will have to be artificially stimulated to breathe. Try the swinging trick if you have trouble with them breathing. You won't be able to give any pain killers like the vet will, but in a last ditch emergency it may be the only way to save your lambs. Don't be afraid to try if necessary. Wait too long and you lose the lambs too. This happened t us twice. We waited too long hoping to save the mamas and by the time we decided the ewe was doomed and tried to save the lambs, it was too late for them too. :hit

So sorry this happened to your ewe. :hugs

You can buy commercially made colostrum. It is not as good as using fresh or frozen goat or sheep colostrum, but it will do. Good luck.
 

Mini Horses

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Most breeders would keep frozen colostrum. I have it in my freezer and renew each year...even freeze the heavier milk from next few days. Wish we were close.

So very sorry about your doe. :hugs

I have had to do an emergency c before. Sad but, saved twin Boer kids. You must be fast and careful with the scalpel. Be prepared as this is what vet may need to do. Have towels ready. Let us know, we care and are praying for you.
 

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