Triple Dewormer?

Mike CHS

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One thing comes to mind....do you give enough, when you worm? My vet always said, kill them, don't stun them!! With the safety margin of overdose with MOST products, it's something to consider. Do not under dose. Also, the condition of pastures, rotation options for you and your area weather, other animals there, all play into the life of worm viability and reinfection.

It's a crap shoot.....we know that certain herbals and forage help keep numbers down, so using that with everything else helps. I never kill the "weeds" in my fields! Well, except nightshade, if I see any.

Many farms estimate weight and in some cases they are pretty accurate and in as many cases they are way off. We worm after running them over the scale so it may be a factor. I'm usually pretty good at estimating weight but I have had many times that I was way off.
 

Beekissed

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Culling for resistance is in the plans for the future, atm with only 9 adult ewes it is a little premature. We do know both of our rams have good parasite resistance so their offspring we hold back....2 ewe lambs this year, are improving our flock.
We've got 9 ewes here also and it's a slow build towards the numbers we want, but 3 of those ewes will be sold at market this winter when prices are higher. Any lambs they produce this fall, if female, will be given a chance to show the influence of the ram in their genetics, but the least little bit of signs of poor worm resistance/tolerance and they too will make a trip to market.
 

misfitmorgan

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Pretty sure we give enough wormer, vet has us doing at a higher rate then labeled...just by a bit. We have no scale so DH picks up the sheep to get the estimated weight, he is pretty close based on the lambs I have weighed on our house scale. A real livestock scale is on the list of things we are getting when we build the livestock shoot as we will need it for commercial sales at auction, to know who to ship out.

We've got 9 ewes here also and it's a slow build towards the numbers we want, but 3 of those ewes will be sold at market this winter when prices are higher. Any lambs they produce this fall, if female, will be given a chance to show the influence of the ram in their genetics, but the least little bit of signs of poor worm resistance/tolerance and they too will make a trip to market.

You're waiting for the price to go up?? :ep

Atm our market reports shows ewes going for $145-190..normal is $70-110 so it is up for us. The market is falling though, 3 weeks ago ewes were going for over $200. Lambs and goats were $250-390 each, currently $210-290.
 

Beekissed

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Pretty sure we give enough wormer, vet has us doing at a higher rate then labeled...just by a bit. We have no scale so DH picks up the sheep to get the estimated weight, he is pretty close based on the lambs I have weighed on our house scale. A real livestock scale is on the list of things we are getting when we build the livestock shoot as we will need it for commercial sales at auction, to know who to ship out.



You're waiting for the price to go up?? :ep

Atm our market reports shows ewes going for $145-190..normal is $70-110 so it is up for us. The market is falling though, 3 weeks ago ewes were going for over $200. Lambs and goats were $250-390 each, currently $210-290.
Yep...in these parts(not exactly, as I have to drive for 2 hrs to get the best pricing) the highest prices are in the winter months, between Jan-Mar. Took 4 older lambs this past winter and after the auction fee we got $924 for them. And they were averaging around 100 lbs....if I had taken lambs between 40-60 lbs it would have been almost double that price. 104 lambs were sold that day in the 40-60 lb range and the total price of those 104 was $44K.

The reason your pricing is dropping is availability....there's an abundance of spring born lambs going to market, which drives the prices down. If we took to market right now we'd be in the same boat. In the winter there's less lamb to be had and more holidays to be celebrated that folks use lamb for, so the prices go up.

We are breeding in the next few days so we can lamb in the fall for a finished crop of lambs in the winter....first time we've done it and don't know if it will work, but we should have bred in May, I think, when temps were cooler. Some hair sheep will breed all year round, some won't, one has to cull for that. With woolly breeds one is locked into breeding at the same time of year~fall~but with the hair breeds, a person has more options.

The beauty of our system is that we don't have to buy feed to finish the lambs, so very little overhead to keep lambs and stock and wait for the pricing to increase....in fact, we NEED more hooves on the land to keep the grass down. These Katahdin stay fat on grass and hay....really fat on really BAD hay, which is a mystery....so I was able to feed them on $5 mulch round bales for most of the winter as I didn't have winter stockpile for them to graze just yet. This next winter we should have winter stock pile available on the stem, so even less need for feeding hay.
 
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Kusanar

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One thing comes to mind....do you give enough, when you worm? My vet always said, kill them, don't stun them!! With the safety margin of overdose with MOST products, it's something to consider.
Yeah, with my horses every few years they would get double dosed to knock out anything that was still hanging around in there. That equates to 2 full tubes for the big guys and a full tube for the mini (he normally gets half a tube)
 

misfitmorgan

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Yep...in these parts(not exactly, as I have to drive for 2 hrs to get the best pricing) the highest prices are in the winter months, between Jan-Mar. Took 4 older lambs this past winter and after the auction fee we got $924 for them. And they were averaging around 100 lbs....if I had taken lambs between 40-60 lbs it would have been almost double that price. 104 lambs were sold that day in the 40-60 lb range and the total price of those 104 was $44K.

The reason your pricing is dropping is availability....there's an abundance of spring born lambs going to market, which drives the prices down. If we took to market right now we'd be in the same boat. In the winter there's less lamb to be had and more holidays to be celebrated that folks use lamb for, so the prices go up.

We are breeding in the next few days so we can lamb in the fall for a finished crop of lambs in the winter....first time we've done it and don't know if it will work, but we should have bred in May, I think, when temps were cooler. Some hair sheep will breed all year round, some won't, one has to cull for that. With woolly breeds one is locked into breeding at the same time of year~fall~but with the hair breeds, a person has more options.

The beauty of our system is that we don't have to buy feed to finish the lambs, so very little overhead to keep lambs and stock and wait for the pricing to increase....in fact, we NEED more hooves on the land to keep the grass down. These Katahdin stay fat on grass and hay....really fat on really BAD hay, which is a mystery....so I was able to feed them on $5 mulch round bales for most of the winter as I didn't have winter stockpile for them to graze just yet. This next winter we should have winter stock pile available on the stem, so even less need for feeding hay.
Makes sense our biggest market here is right before easter like a week or two before. We have two auctions one is 1.5hrs away and the other is 2hrs away if we went 5hrs away to the eastern market we would get really good prices but need pretty big number for the drive to be worth it, you average $75-100 more per lamb/goat there as long as they are young for the around easter market, later in the year towards other holidays you can do intact goats for a good price that are bigger.

Our lambs are suppose to go to market in a week and a half per withdrawl times....at current prices for light lambs we should get between $1,300-1750 for 6 which im happy with anything over $150 which is what we get locally. We will see what prices do for the auction between now and when we plan to sell but as far as I know a lot of people are sold out of lambs atm so it should go back up a bit. The first 3 auctions(weekly) for may had 50some sheep/goats per auction, the one yesterday was down to 22. Most people here have springs lambs in january/febuary except the big producers who lamb in november/december to hit that easter time market with their 3-4 month olds. Ours will be almost exactly 4 months old.

Our buck kid from last fall is going to market tomorrow again anything over $150 I'm a happy camper. He is going to the auction farther north so it will be a crap shoot as last week goats were $35-175. If we could take him to the auction farther south it would be $75-375 according to yesterdays report but those are mondays only and we both already have tomorrow off.

Yeah, with my horses every few years they would get double dosed to knock out anything that was still hanging around in there. That equates to 2 full tubes for the big guys and a full tube for the mini (he normally gets half a tube)
I remember worming our horses....we both mutually hated and dreaded it. I'm 5'4", I had big horses and was worming alone with nothing more then a lead rope. My first horse was a almost 5yr old "adopted" standardbred ex-racehorse who was almost 17 hands. He was a trotter and oh man could he go! His career earnings were $286,000 then he got a bowed tendon and I got him almost a year later for $550.
 

Kusanar

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I remember worming our horses....we both mutually hated and dreaded it. I'm 5'4", I had big horses and was worming alone with nothing more then a lead rope.
I got lucky. I have only had 1 horse that was truly bad about it and he had to have a chain lead rope run through his mouth in order to worm him. My current bunch will practically suck it from the tube
 

misfitmorgan

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I got lucky. I have only had 1 horse that was truly bad about it and he had to have a chain lead rope run through his mouth in order to worm him. My current bunch will practically suck it from the tube
That would be nice, it wasnt that he was so bad about it. He would just always spit it out so I would have to try to old his head up until he swallowed which was not easy being so short. I even tried the quest apple flavor gel...no go lol.
 
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