Wild amaranth safe?

For the Love of Dirt

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I’ve been told that this is wild amaranth in our garden, and was wondering if it was safe for goats. I don’t yet have goats, but hope to get some this fall once we have a barn built, and since our pigs, chickens and turkeys refuse to eat this stuff, I was hoping that I could put the goats here to clear this stuff out. It has taken over our garden, our first year planting on this property, and we must have hit a huge seed deposit while tilling, as I don’t remember seeing it last year when the area was pasture. It is literally a pain with their thorns, and there is so much of it We just can’t get it under control. After this gardening season is over we are planning on turning the pigs and chickens, separately of course, in the garden, but since they won’t eat it, we need another control method, and I’m hoping it is safe for the goats, and will they even eat it?
 

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frustratedearthmother

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You're right - it is a type of wild amaranth. We call it by it's common name here which is Spiny Pig Weed. It's horrible! My goats will nibble the leaves off of it but generally not enough to kill the plant. Tilling is the WORST thing - that stuff will come up by the millions of seedlings as you've already found.
 

Baymule

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Put on blue jeans, boots, long sleeve shirt and gloves. Pull it up, pile and burn it. It’s going to seed, better do it NOW if not sooner. I have vast experience with pig weed. You may have to get a shovel and dig it out. Or the quick way is to machete chop it off at the ground and carry it to the burn pile. Turn pigs in the garden over the winter and they will root up and eat the roots.

Pigs in the garden in the winter is a fantastic way to fertilize the garden. Be sure to put a shelter in there for them. You can make a 3 sided pallet structure, drive t- posts through them to secure them. Put a roof on it and fill with hay. Then let them go to work for you!
 
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