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misfitmorgan

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Lol, that's kinda funny.

I have 4ft field fencing inside the property line, then various cross fencing. Others use a single or double hot wire by the road and I'm always in awe that they're able to get away with so little! Definitely cheap to be able to use hot wire vs any other fencing. I would never trust it, though, got too many pain in the butt animals screwing around, making me second guess all my life choices. 😅
Same! The place our new buck came from had mothing but 3 wires of electric and I was like....but how??? Would never in my life put MY goats in just hot wire they would be out in 10 minutes no matter how hot it was.

DH asked me yesterday if I thought it would be alright to put up some hot wire pasture area for our older calves, im dubious but said we could try it if we put up the front fence first....aka the fence between our land and the road that will be page wire and privacy fence. He said cows stay in fences better...I dunno.
 

farmerjan

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Virginia actually has both fence IN, AND fence OUT counties. Our county of Rockbridge is a fence out county. The one directly north of us is Augusta and it is a fence in county. We have rented places in both counties. That said, with the value of the livestock, it makes sense to keep them contained behind a fence. But as long as they are on our properties, rented or owned, no one can say anything. Since the one farm borders the interstate.... just south of the Rockbridge county line, the VDOT is responsible for maintaining the fence along the interstate to keep the animals out. Still, things happen, and we try to be diligent to keep the fences up so the animals stay put. Unless an animal has an identifying eartag or brand or tattoo or you personally claim it; in Rockbridge county if it causes say an accident, and no one "claims it", they cannot assign blame to the closest landowner. It can get sticky... I look for all counties to go fence in except maybe the most remote ones. In Highland county, west of here, they actually have cattle guards in the county roads... if the landowner owns both sides of the road, to facilitate grazing and such. I think it is a great idea. However, here the people drive too fast and we are slowly losing the ruralness that used to define many of the dominant agriculture and more remote western counties.

We also carry a big liability policy due to rented and leased as well as owned land, with the animals being here and there during the grazing season... and with the interstate so close, and with all the citiots moving out here and if a cow gets out, someone hitting it is just a nightmare....or damaging someone's fancy planted / landscaped lawn and all the expensive shrubs....

Animals that are trained to and respectful of good hotwire are less likely to get out and cause a problem than those that are used to a barrier type fence (woven wire field fencing, barbed wire, even board fencing) say if there is a windstorm and a tree takes down a part of the fence....or like us, a stupid driver goes through the fence or the idiot that took out the corner post and tore down the section of fence with the back end of the tractor trailer/tires.... because they will be more respectful that the fence could "jump up and bite them" even from the ground.... A mvisual barrier fence that has a hole in it is an invite to get out the hole.....
Still I would want a good barrier, woven wire or board fence around my perimeter ..... electric is fine for cross fencing and to reinforce another fence......
 

farmerjan

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I had hogs that were inside 1 strand of electric.... they got zapped and respected it after that. To the point that they would not cross where the fence was after I took it down..... I had to put the feeder halfway across the original "fence line" and in their push to eat, didn't realize they were over the line until they found the grass... it was funny to watch them go up close and not stick their noses past it.... but then they would get hit by the electric around the new area when they got silly running and playing in the newly allowed area and didn't know to stop....
A good HOT fence will keep most any cattle in .... unless they decide to jump it.... I've seen bulls that would not test an electric fence with cattle in heat on the other side....
 

River Buffaloes

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Very cute cattle, I can see how they would work for small farms with not a lot of land.

There is very little government owned land in Texas. It is all mostly privately owned, fenced and No Trespassing signs posted, or purple paint painted on trees. The purple paint means keep off. Can’t let livestock run loose, cars go too fast down even the most remote country roads. If someone hits your animal, it’s your fault and you are liable for damages. Can’t hunt on someone else’s property either. You have to lease hunting land from the owner and shooting off the roads is illegal.

Well in concept all lands in India belongs to the government and only the crops or house or any other installations belong to the person the land is registered to. We are required to pay a token amount as rent to government. In my case I practically own 32 hectares of land, but in theory I am only a person on whose name the land is registered, in theory the land belongs to the central government. Right to property is not a fundamental right. Remember India is a socialist country. So no one can stop us from grazing our animals on a land which is not used, except the government herself.

images - 2021-06-08T222129.930.jpeg
 

Baymule

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So no inheritance? No passing on the farm to your kids. What about housing? Do you have to pay rent to the government? We can own our homes and land, but have to pay taxes on it. I bet your rent is cheaper than house payments.
 

River Buffaloes

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So no inheritance? No passing on the farm to your kids. What about housing? Do you have to pay rent to the government? We can own our homes and land, but have to pay taxes on it. I bet your rent is cheaper than house payments.
No, there's inheritance. The land is passed to the descendents, it gets registered on their name.

The rent is just nominal. It's just to show that the land belongs to the government. It not something that they came up after independence. Before independence India had a feudal system. In which farmers payed rent to the local lord, who paid to the bigger lord and he in turn paid to whoever ruled in Delhi eg British, Mughals all the way back to first century AD. Any farmer who failed to pay was evicted from the land. However all governments except the British, gave leniency incase of drought or floods. The most Brits did was to collect the tax next year if this year's harvest failed. They also had a thing called Sunset Law, according to which if you fail to pay revenue before the set date your lands will be taken back. They also collected tax in silver coins only. The earlier rulers accepted revenue in coins, grain or labor (begar). This forced farmers to raise cash crops like sugarcane, indigo, cotton, jute and most importantly opium which they sold in China. This resulted in shortage of food crops. They also raised taxes significantly, for example the nawab of Bengal collected revenue worth 600,000 silver coins from Purnea district, the British raised it to 2,500,000 in their first year of the conquest of Bengal. There were 30 famines in India between 1851-1900 and India lost 10% of it's population.
 

Baymule

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Before the massive and quick transfer of food, famines were common and many people died of starvation. It still happens, but at least now other nations can send food relief.

The rent on the land sounds the same as taxes on our homes and land. We own it until we don’t pay the taxes. It takes several years before the government takes your property due to non payment. Then it is auctioned off.
 

River Buffaloes

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Before the massive and quick transfer of food, famines were common and many people died of starvation. It still happens, but at least now other nations can send food relief.

The rent on the land sounds the same as taxes on our homes and land. We own it until we don’t pay the taxes. It takes several years before the government takes your property due to non payment. Then it is auctioned off.

Yes, for all practical purposes it's the same thing. It's just not called tax. To signify that the land belongs to the State, which in turn represent people. I said that the person on whose name the land is registered, is it's owner, just not in name.
 
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