A NEW DIRECTION FOR THE OLD RAM

Kusanar

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@Kusanar , just for your general info, there are 2 breeds of "belted cattle". Dutch belted that are a dairy breed, and belted Galloways that are a beef breed. When crossed with other breeds the belt is often predominate and will show up , sometimes not as a full belt, but still distinguishable.
I think the ones around here are all the Galloways, but I did recently find out about the Dutch belted and kind of want one... lol
 

The Old Ram-Australia

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G'day, yes I think she is a black under that soft winter coat .She will shed it as we forward to summer.
 

The Old Ram-Australia

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G'day folks, today we made a few adjustments to the new yard setup.This new addition will allow for foot trimming,weighing and lamb marking without impacting the use of the fourth yard .
 

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The Old Ram-Australia

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G’day , as a group we are now spread across the whole world and through our members I wonder if we can find others who are working toward a Meat sheep which needs none of the following. Shearing, crutching, drenching, black lining or Vaccinations. Who need none of the following to survive and re-produce, artificial fertilizers, modern pastures species chemical sprays, soil disturbance of any kind and except in Extreme circumstances hand feeding .As well as developing an understanding of landscape and water management. As this is the path I am treading , surly I must not be the only one ?So if you are aware of such a person or group please encourage them to join us and share their experiences.

I posted this on our FB page in Australia called AUSTRALIAN PAINTED SHEEP. In what seems to be quite a short time it has expanded worldwide with sheep people from far and wide joining and highlighting their own and local breeds for the enjoyment of the group..So if you are or know of someone who fits the description ,please have them contact me here or at the page....T.O.R.


 

The Old Ram-Australia

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G'day folks, daughter took a snap of me on the boards,(remember I'm 78 now) and its not my best side
😉
.But at my age you cannot be too choosy...Getting through the "cleaning up" of the flock,but we still have about 100 to go over the next little while..Frank.
2020 shearing.jpg
 

Baymule

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You are awesome. You get more done at your age than many a young person. I admire you for starting on a composite breed of sheep with all the attributes you listed above. No sitting in the rocking chair for you!
 

THE OTHER OLD RAM

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G'day everybody,thought I would post 2 posts from our F.B.page to update you all on the way things are progressing.

G'day folks,it's just started to rain,no wind so it will freshen up all the pastures..The reason for this post is there is a new addition to the farm.He is male and 3 weeks old ,Meg (mum) has been keeping him well hidden and none of the other dogs are allowed near her pen...Not great photos ,but will try for some better ones in coming days.


This afternoon when we took the dogs for a swim in the dam pictured ,I thought a few of the pasture growth would be of interest.
The first couple are of the dam and the area surrounding it.The rest are the area around the new structure in the creek.In the last one the dog is just visible and the growth is up to the running board of the car.Hope you all enjoy.

Questions arising : ,no we do not cut hay: all this growth will return to the soil along with the seed to restore the seed bank ready to respond to the end of the next dry.BTW none of our pastures have been Super-ed in the last 20+ years of our ownership.
in farming our land we have 2 rules which we live by."make the livestock fit the landscape, not the landscape fit the stock", the other is don't drive the land beyond its natural capability "...we have found over the years if you respect the second the capability will naturally increase over time.

to my mind there is a fixation on neat and tidy attitude to pasture management. lets say" ,you have a 35 c wind blowing across your pasture, if you have cut it to the ground all the soft growth will be burnt to a crisp.but by leaving the dry growth standing the wind is held above this soft growth to be consumed by the stock.what we have found over time that in times of excessive heat the stock will graze in the cool of the night....T.O.R
 

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Baymule

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Your land shows the care you have given it. Leaving the grass standing for grazing and trampling it down, gives the nutrients back to the soil and adds humus that covers and protects the roots. Most people here overgraze their land, cattle keep nipping off the new growth, not giving the grass time to grow back.

It is winter here, after a hot and dry summer, dry fall and we just this week got frost. Frost usually comes in the first of November, it is late this year. It is raining, expected to be a half inch, we'll sure take it! I sowed rye grass and crimson clover. Since it was so dry, I was late sowing the seed, but this rain will help. Some is already up, sheep are dry lotted with a big round bale of hay. I grew a large winter squash and am chopping it up for them to have a bit of fresh feed.


I bought the seed from www.rareseed.com

That puppy is a cutie! I know he will not only have the best of care, but will enter the pack and get the best training he could possibly get. Do you ever sell any of your puppies or started dogs?
 
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