Anatolian Pyrenees

Sequestered Ridge Ranch

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Day 1 of training, basically show Pooch around the property and get him familiarized with where the property lines are at. Did about a hour and covered 30 acres, he was bit worn out towards the end so I didn't take him too far. Might not seem much to the people in flat places, but that walk consisted up a ridge 150', across a ridge line, over some hills and through a couple of ravines that drop almost straight down up 50' deep.
Kept up and only stopped once for him to eat some snow in one of the ravines. Got energy, I'm going to burn it like politicians burn money.
 

Ridgetop

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That type of snow is what I would much rather see on the cows, rather than the cold wet SOAKING through to the skin rains we get.
I lived in Germany as a child and the snow seemed to make everything warmer. Seattle in the rain (4 years of high school) was miserable - wet cold feels colder than snow cold.
Might not seem much to the people in flat places, but that walk consisted up a ridge 150', across a ridge line, over some hills and through a couple of ravines that drop almost straight down up 50' deep.
We live on property like that. Those ravines and gullies are only good for sheep and goats! LOL 35 years of climbing up and down steep slopes to store hay and feed, milk and bottle feed dairy goats, retrieve lambs born at bottom of guy, feed sheep, care for animals, repair fences, run water lines, put in stairs, grade, put in outbuildings, etc. :old Still in our Primes, but years of work on that terrain has made us excited to move to our new flat ranch.
IMG_5616 (1).JPG From driveway IMG_5613.JPG From barn
3 flights of stairs going down to rear pasture. Driveway at top, barn one flight down, milk shed another flight down and another 4' drop to pasture field. Next set of stairs going down past milk shed.
IMG_5617.JPG East pasture to north L south R IMG_5883.JPG To ravine bottom100'on 30-40 degree slope. From bottom of gully to fence is shear in places. Unclimbable by humans everywhere.
IMG_6274.JPG Front slope - this is the climbable side of property
But the mountains give us great sunsets and un winter beautiful vistas
Maude sunset5 5.jpg IMG_5406.JPG I will miss the mountains but NOT climbing and descending the steep slopes! Our new place is flat with drainage so won't get waterlogged with heavy rains, and pond has overflow channel.
 

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Sequestered Ridge Ranch

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My house when I build it will be in the saddle of a ridge where it drops down about 10' and goes back up for it's the end of the ridge to the right in that picture, hence the screen name. Though behind me drops down as much after so many feet I have heavy equipment to bring in and flatten a pad out then bury the house on 3 sides, might do the roof too, very tempting. This view is about 100' higher than where the pole barn is, but I plan on tunneling to the pole barn to make it not so steep, keep us from busting our arses in winter and put a rail system in for a cart of sorts to ride.
Untitled(18).jpg
 

Sequestered Ridge Ranch

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Great ideas since avoiding snow drift by building on top of the ridge would expose you to tremendous winds.
Technically there is a offshoot of the ridge that also dead ends where the house will be and that would do it also. Main reason is for temperature control since the ground is 42°F year around deep enough.
 

CloneFly

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I just found this thread and wowza! It's a treasure trove! We just got our first LSG a few weeks back. He's 1/3 Anatolian and the rest Pyrenees and is about 11-12wks old right now. We brought him home at 9-10wks. We live on a suburban property that is less that 1/4 an acre, but we have a flock of 20+ chickens, some rabbits, cats, quail, a goose and a turkey. We're having some trouble with training... specifically with getting him to not play pounce.... or to stop grabbing my skirt or legs...or not eating his own crap.. or the chickens'crap... or make him stop barkin at 3am... he's learned to sit and lay down though! 😂:he

If anyone has suggestions on how to properly train him, I would greatly appreciate any advice! We love him to death, and we're hoping he'll become a good flock and property guardian and family member :)
 

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frustratedearthmother

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Trying "positive" methods to train Pooch and well it ain't working when I can't find what he really likes for treats. Seriously, what dog doesn't like dog biscuits?
Won't have to worry about him raiding the cookie jar in the night at this rate.
My LGD's aren't as treat motivated as many other breeds. Makes bribing them so much more difficult, lol!
 

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