Bruce's Journal

Bruce

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Where did you learn to do such work? Did you learn from others, learn on your own (trial-and-error), or something else?
Yes! :D
Lots of good stuff on YouTube though it didn't exist when I did the prior house. I have many books ... you know, those paper things with pictures and words ;)

Start small and work your way up. My step-father gave us a table saw for a wedding present. DW had a jigsaw, I bought a sliding compound miter saw. And then more hand and power tools as I needed them. I need a shop the size of Mike's for all my big stand tools, but don't have it. Kind of crowded in there. If I had his space I could get even MORE tools!!
 

Baymule

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I am in admiration of your carpentry trim abilities. :bow

My son's house needs trim finished out. The last workman he had in there left his sliding compound miter saw. That was a year ago and he never answered son's phone calls. It's mine now. I reckon I'll learn how to use it and finish out the trim. But I bet next to your lovely trim work, mine will look like it was miter cut by a beaver on meth.
 

Bruce

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Congratulations on your new saw Bay, you'll be fine! Get a new fine cut blade for it since you are doing trim. Use the existing old one for framing work. Remember, inside corners are coped, never mitered. If the baseboard is just rectangular board, it is easy, butt the pieces together in the corner. Outside corners are mitered. If you need to put in baseboard on a wall that is longer than the boards, cut the joint at 45°, easy to do with that new saw :)

One of the reasons I chose the "craftsman" design is because it is easier than "picture framing" the window. There is rarely anything in a house that is perfectly square and the 45°(ish) angles on the corners of the frame are hard to get right without visible gaps, especially if you saw is off by even part of a degree. The wider the pieces, the harder it is. When people are going to paint they fill the gaps with filler or caulk then paint over it. They are still pretty obvious and of course you can't hide the gap at all when you urethane instead of paint. I've never seen filler that perfectly matches, even if you make it from sawdust created when you cut the wood.

I also left it fairly plain, no detailing on the long parts since "too fancy" doesn't go well with 170 year old exposed beams and pine ceilings. Plus I don't have the hands to do all the sanding that was needed on the trim I made for the prior house. I didn't 45° there either, I made rosettes. Again way more sanding than my hands will do now, somehow it was easier 30 years ago.

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Bruce

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Got my first pullet egg from the 6 new girls today :) A MASSIVE ;) 34 gram brown egg. I am GUESSING Nina since she has the most red comb and wattles. She laid it in the box under the ladder in the feed room.

Aurora also laid, she's been doing 1 or 2 a week even though she is moulting. Never had a hen do that before. AND her last 4 eggs have been on the floor of the coop. This from a girl that has been laying in the nest boxes for 2 years without a break. What the heck?
 
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