chanceosunshine

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Interesting! Here is the link to the list I was going by. To clarify, the pine was actually meant as something that could injure them, not actually poison, but it doesn't list lilacs at all. I wonder if maybe I should be going by a different list.


Goats can eat pine bows. Mine love them. I actually cut branches off now because they have eaten the pines as high as they can reach. What I have seen is goats sample things and if they don't like it they don't eat it. Lilacs are listed as not good for goats but mine eat them without any ill effects.
 

chickens really

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Interesting! Here is the link to the list I was going by. To clarify, the pine was actually meant as something that could injure them, not actually poison, but it doesn't list lilacs at all. I wonder if maybe I should be going by a different list.

Oh my goodness. If that was the case all livestock would be dead and kept in dry lots. That's quite a list! 😳😂
 

chickens really

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I know certain garden plants are toxic to goats. Now weather they kill or cause stomach upset is another thing? Tomato, potato plant should be avoided. Certain shrubs. I keep my goats from the front yard and only let them out in the pasture during the summer.
 

chanceosunshine

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Oh my goodness. If that was the case all livestock would be dead and kept in dry lots. That's quite a list! 😳😂
That was my thought as well! I tend to take things pretty literally but this list is hard to wrap your mind around and I want to give the goats some credit. I can see if they were in a situation that they were starving they may eat enough of something to sicken or kill them. Some of the first goat people we met had goats that ate something that sickened them enough for a veterinarian to be called. So, I'm torn as to how careful you need to be.
 

chickens really

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That was my thought as well! I tend to take things pretty literally but this list is hard to wrap your mind around and I want to give the goats some credit. I can see if they were in a situation that they were starving they may eat enough of something to sicken or kill them. Some of the first goat people we met had goats that ate something that sickened them enough for a veterinarian to be called. So, I'm torn as to how careful you need to be.
I'm just cautious but not paranoid. My goats only go out on pasture when I'm outside with them. Mine have a large goat yard that they can eat grasses and safe from plants and predators. I don't think you need to be too worried.
 

Caprine

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Well, if I had to pull all of those plants from my property, I'd go the the hospital from mental illness. Some of then are obvious, but I would think that's if there's plenty of plants to eat, the goats would stay away from the poisonous ones. Thanks for the advice, though. I'll do some more looking on that.
 

chanceosunshine

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I'm just cautious but not paranoid. My goats only go out on pasture when I'm outside with them. Mine have a large goat yard that they can eat grasses and safe from plants and predators. I don't think you need to be too worried.
Thank you. This is what I was hoping to hear!
 

chanceosunshine

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Well, if I had to pull all of those plants from my property, I'd go the the hospital from mental illness. Some of then are obvious, but I would think that's if there's plenty of plants to eat, the goats would stay away from the poisonous ones. Thanks for the advice, though. I'll do some more looking on that.
I feel the same way. It would make it nearly impossible to raise goats anywhere.
Good luck with your studying and future goats!
 

Jesusfreak101

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On odious plants the toxins of most plants mean the animal as to invest a large amount of it before it becomes toxic no that being said some plants i would avoid regardless because i have heard of them being deadly at very little contact. Olander is one such plant. We had a nightshade plant that i was planning to chop out before i got to it the goats destroyed it and are still alive several weeks later so yeah. Traditionally goat will rarely eat to much of anyone plant to get to that point. The biggest threat to them is being grain glutons or quick changes in feed.
 

Mini Horses

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Goats like to nibble and move. They "generally" leave the plants that are bad because they are "generally" distasteful. However, some are really bad and I have had a couple eat and puke. Yes, unlike some animals, they can do this because of the cud chew, regurgitate ability. MOSTLY they avoid the bad plants. Now, nightshade can kill a horse! I've seen a goat nibble & leave it. Tomato & eggplant are part of nightshade family. Often plants listed can be less of an issue but, caution rules a list.

As to seasonal breeding and staggering births -- often done for milk supply -- you can cover almost 6 months difference. Goats will differ but, some can be bred as early as July -- tho most often it is Aug/Sept. And, I have had does breed as late as early March -- tho most often Feb is late as they go. So Sep to Feb is 6 months. Your local weather can influence their cycling and a handsome, young buck can, too. Some breeds are more inclined to a longer "seasonal" time.
 
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