Head stuck in fence!!

farmerjan

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Just read where you are sending Fran back to her original owners. I guess that is best for you... she would have just gone to a sale if she were mine... unless you had a prior agreement. But regardless, she will be gone and not causing trouble at your place and the kids can safely enjoy the goats too now.
 

Baymule

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You are making the right decision to take that goat back to her previous owners. Farming is not a Walt Disney experience. An animal like that is not one you want on your farm, disrupting the whole place making everyone miserable. Recognizing that is sometimes hard, but you have to look at the overall farm. Fractious, mean, bad behavior animals have no place on a small farm.

We got Ringo 4 years ago from @Mike CHS and his wife. Absolutely the sweetest ram on earth. Granddaughters are safe with him. This was 2 years ago, my youngest granddaughter was 4. THIS is why no mean animals on my farm!

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This is Ringo and Sheba, my Anatolian LGD. They are buddies.

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This is Cooper, newest ram, as of a week or two ago. @Ridgetop and her DH hitched onto my trailer and we went to Tennessee to @Mike CHS to bring Cooper to Texas. Fun trip! Copper is also a calm gentle ram, has excellent genetics and will be a wonderful addition to my flock.

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Baymule

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There is a member here, The Old Ram Australia that is building a composite breed to fit Australia. His Facebook page is


His thread here on BYH

 

Ridgetop

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Your experience is why we disbudded all our goats as kids. Except for the bucklings that went to auction at 2 months and brought more money with horns and uncastrated. Anything with horns is bad for fences. If she was larger and more powerful she could really tear up the fence. Another thing we noticed with horned goats (we had a couple Boers we bought to start our herd) was that they were more willing to fight each other.

So glad you are sending her back to the previous owner. In future, just send the animal to the auction. You need not feel you have to warn anyone about any problems at the auction. Auction animals carry no guarantee since that is where all the culls end up.
 

Nommie Bringeruvda Noms

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We would have sent her to freezer camp. I have a buck now, who's previous owner said he had to go. I thought it was because she needed fresh blood in her breeding program, but the reality is, she just couldn't handle him. He's incredibly skittish. Not mean, but I can't get close to him, so in the 10months I've had him, he hasn't had any health checks, no grooming, including his hooves that were bad, to start with, and his whole coat (Nigora for their fiber, and my breeding program) went to waste, because I couldn't collect his fiber, when he rooed. So, he's getting one more chance to submit. I have a friend who has broken goats, donkeys, horses, and miles of their skittishness. If it doesn't work, he's going to freezer camp, next month. I won't pass him off to another breeder, and don't want behavioral difficulty bred into my flock. In your case - sending her back where she came from was a great solution.
 

Nommie Bringeruvda Noms

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It's what I'm hoping for. But, she isn't going to do it - she going to coach me through it. I might as well learn, so if/ when it happens again, I'll be able to start the training, right away, rather than having to wait until she can get away from her chores & life. That is one very busy lady (homesteader with livestock, military vet active w VA, caregiver for her dad, vet tech, dog fosterer & trainer, and therapy dog owner, visiting nursing homes & rehab centers.) I love to pick this young lady's brain! She's brilliant.
 

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