Introducing Myself

Ridgetop

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I thought we wanted to start adding meat goats, but ended up with 9 shetland and shetland/finn cross sheep, including a ram and his companion wether, and 4 Cheviot ewes. We also ended up with an ND buck and his companion wether, and three more ND does, one of which is in milk. Of the rescue goats the ND doe has been bred, and we are really hoping the buck and the rescue LaMancha will get their logistics figured out, lol!
All those sheep and goats are edible - no need to buy any special breeds wince you already have plenty of breedable animals. Have fun learning with the ones you have got and you can decide if you want to change breeds or species later.
I am 52 and DH is 60 and we do not have the advantage of youth.
Bite your tongue, Girl!!! You are in your PRIME! Like the rest of us. Prime is better than Youth - we have wisdom and know the benefit of working smart instead of just hard. :lol: We do work hard, but do it in a smart way. :gig
 

oaksandiron

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All those sheep and goats are edible - no need to buy any special breeds wince you already have plenty of breedable animals. Have fun learning with the ones you have got and you can decide if you want to change breeds or species later.

Bite your tongue, Girl!!! You are in your PRIME! Like the rest of us. Prime is better than Youth - we have wisdom and know the benefit of working smart instead of just hard. :lol: We do work hard, but do it in a smart way. :gig
😂 Well said! And so true!

Your words about deciding on breeds ring particularly true, since I am struggling to stop buying animals. Those words of wisdom were exactly what I needed to hear today!
 

Ridgetop

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since I am struggling to stop buying animals.

HINT: Stay away from livestock auctions. If you want to sell something, and you are susceptible to bidding on "sweet, sad" animals - drop off your sale animals and go home. The auction will send you a check. Most of the "sweet, sad" animals at auctions are there for a reason - they are not good specimens, they are sick, or have something else wrong with them. Auctions are where small stock producers get rid of their meat animals or problem animals. Cattle auctions are ok if you have experience and know what you are doing - like Farmerjan.

Keep what you have and learn on them. It is easy to overextend yourself and your bankroll. You need to learn what is the maximum number of animals for your acreage, your family to care for, afford to feed, and supply vet care. 13 sheep and 5 goats (one of them pregnant) is quite a few to start with. Particularly when your sheep are all wool sheep which will need shearing annually. You can run the ram and with the sheep, and the buck with the does, as ling as you want them bred. BUT you can't run the buck and ram with a combined flock/herd of goats and sheep. You can keep the ram, buck, and wethers together in another enclosure. When breeding your animals you will have to separate the species, or the ram and buck will try to breed the opposite species and will fight with each other. (We had a llama who was not wethered and he tried to breed a couple of our dairy goats. I shoved him into the trailer and off to the vet immediately!)

And FYI when keeping bucks and rams together without females, don't be surprised if you see them trying to breed each other, or the wethers. This is pretty normal when keeping stud animals together without females.
 

Skiesblue

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Welcome and feel free to ask questions. There is a wealth of knowledge here. I am in East Texas and have raised hair sheep for several years. I am in my mid 60’s and have recovered from a knee injury and a move to a new ranch. I was a misfit in the suburbs. Livestock has taught me so much. And there is always more to learn.
 

oaksandiron

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Livestock has taught me so much. And there is always more to learn.
This is SO true! I am fond of telling people that my heart horse helped teach me to be fully human.

My goats are teaching me patience, and to think ahead.

My sheep are teaching me the value of controlling my reactivity.

My LGD is teaching me that I have a lot to learn yet.
 

purplequeenvt

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Can I ask who you got your Shetlands from? I also have Shetlands and I’m originally from
VT (Burlington area).

My family had raised Border Leicesters for many years before a neighbor that was getting divorced/moving gave me her small flock of ewes and I quickly fell in love with the little monsters. I moved to KY 4 years ago and brought my flock (both Border Leicesters and Shetlands) with me.
 

Mini Horses

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because our bees also live there and bears are an issue here. It is going to be the 8' fence for us now, cheaper than a double field fence.
Ouch! I'd sure have some extra posts & HOT wire 😁😳. They can tear up a building, a fence is nothing for them & honey -- or a goat. Powerful animals.

After thought: Another thread -- saving colostrum from goats. Freeze it in small containers. When/if you need to use it, do not microwave - it'll destroy most enzyme in it. Set container of colostrum in a container of hot water to thaw. 👍 milk straight from goat is 101-103*. Also, a cold kid can't nurse, so if you have one limp, warm it before feeding attempts. Warm towel from dryer or heating pad, etc. Finger in mouth tells you--no cold fingers or keep warming.😊
 
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