1. BYH Official Poll: What are the things that you should consider before buying herds?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  2. Hoof trimming help - Featured Thread
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Dismiss Notice
  4. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)
    Dismiss Notice

Keeping Predators away.

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Tapsmom, Mar 17, 2014.

  1. Mar 19, 2014
    Tapsmom

    Tapsmom Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    47
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Hilarie, you're goats look like quite the characters!
    OK, my computer is finally behaving. Here are pictures of our setup..showing the fencing :) Hopefully this will help you guys determine whether I have it at all safe for the goaties. You can see the front of the fencing, but The back fencing is a bit tougher to see..I'll have to get better pics of them. The back fencing is about 6-8 inches shorter..I believe it is 42" tall verses 48" All fencing is electrified. I had to get the taller one in the front since my goofy horse will hop it if it's off. The woods in the back are about 150" from the back of the fence. The first and last pictures were taken off my back porch..so I have a nice, close view of everyone. In fact, we often toss snacks right to them from the porch lol. 2014-03-18 08.59.45.jpg 2014-03-18 08.57.16.jpg 2014-03-18 08.59.36.jpg 2014-03-18 08.57.05.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2014
    hilarie likes this.
  2. Mar 19, 2014
    M.L. McKnight

    M.L. McKnight Overrun with beasties

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2014
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    145
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Mississippi
    That fencing will do fine once everyone gets a good zap. I use that same type of netting to keep in some of my hogs, they weigh around 400lbs each. My only criticism of the netting is that it seems to sag and every so often you have to move your posts back a bit more to tighten it back up.

    I thought of something for you, you could place a couple of 5 gallon buckets in the back corners of your your fence line and have your beer buddies assist you in filling them. Once they are full, tip them and start all over again. I figured that would save you from having to drive in any posts and should do the trick.
     
  3. Mar 20, 2014
    Tapsmom

    Tapsmom Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    257
    Likes Received:
    47
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Location:
    Connecticut
    I did just tighten it and it does a beautiful job keeping everyone in. My concern was keeping coyotes out! :) I like the bucket idea, thanks!
     
    goatboy1973 likes this.
  4. Mar 20, 2014
    M.L. McKnight

    M.L. McKnight Overrun with beasties

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2014
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    145
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Mississippi
    Sure thing.
     
    goatboy1973 likes this.
  5. Mar 21, 2014
    goatboy1973

    goatboy1973 True BYH Addict Golden Herd Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2013
    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    438
    Trophy Points:
    233
    Location:
    Corryton, Tennessee
    Nope, not enough protection. Go ahead and get yourself a llama or LGD.
     
  6. Mar 21, 2014
    hilarie

    hilarie Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    182
    Location:
    Coventry, CT
    I'm thinking more and more about a LGD...haven't had any goat predation problems at this point, but it'd be stupid to wait until the ship was sinking to find the lifeboat. I know a lot in theory about them, and I've owned several dozen dogs in my life, mostly in the herding group (bouviers, GSD) but also some mutt/hound oddballs and two Portuguese Water Dogs. I've also raised 9 GSD puppies for Fidelco (Guide Dog Foundation) so I feel I know what I'm doing with training, socializing and obedience; but I know NOTHING about how to raise a LGD that will live with my goats and really not be a pet...in a way it's a whole different planet. Advice, anyone? I'd love a maremma like my cousin has, but I have a feeling a GP would be easier to come by, and I've always loved the breed.
     
  7. Mar 25, 2014
    Pips

    Pips Chillin' with the herd

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    48
    1. I would think about getting a donkey or Llama, if you can't have a guardian dog, as you suggest. They actually make great guardians, noisy and extremely violent when pushed.
    2. make sure there is no rubbish around, no smells that would attract.
    3. put your younger animals away at night is also a good measure, coyotes won't take on larger adults unless they have to.
    4. leave things that smell of you around the perimeter.
    5. motion lights work extremely well too, especially if very bright and motion water sprayers are great too.
    6. predator urine is also good. Hard to get hold of sometimes, but wolf and bear urine keep coyotes away. Other predators require other different types. Some farmers bring in other dogs or even pee on the fences themselves. :)
    7. wind chimes/bells, although annoying, deter predators from coming close. Or/and bells on the fence also helps.
     
    goatboy1973 and hilarie like this.
  8. Mar 25, 2014
    purplequeenvt

    purplequeenvt True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1,849
    Likes Received:
    1,401
    Trophy Points:
    263
    Location:
    Charlotte, VT
    I guarantee a coyote will take on a "larger" adult - especially a ND goat! A ND is a snack for a coyote.

    We had major predator issues last year. We lost a lamb to a bobcat in the spring and lost 3 adult sheep (2 Shetlands and one larger crossbred) and had another sheep seriously injured in the summer/fall. I got a Pyr puppy in May of 2013 and another Pyr pup in December 2013. I also have a couple llamas.

    My advice - lock your goats up every night until you get your fence up. If you are thinking about a guard animal, but LGDs aren't an option, I'd go with the llamas over the donkeys. They are quiet and have similar feed and care requirements as sheep and goats. You would need to get them sheared every year or every other year.
     
  9. Mar 25, 2014
    Pips

    Pips Chillin' with the herd

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    48
    ND don't have to be that small to be s snack :) adults can reach 70+ cms. But you are right, adults are also at risk, but the young tend to attract more attention.

    @purplequeenvt Coyotes tend to prefer smaller prey, rabbits,moles, rats, etc I am told ... they tend to be opportunists with larger prey and will, if hungry and in a pack take down goats and sheep. I have never experienced coyote country with a herd,so going on secondhand information here, so I defer to your experience.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2014
  10. Mar 25, 2014
    Pips

    Pips Chillin' with the herd

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    48
    I would definitely go gentler breed on your decision, stay away from the ancient heavy hitters unless you really feel you have the confidence, like CAOs, Kangals, Tibetans, COs, etc ... I like GPs and have seen numerous posts on them being the best all rounder, although strong willed, they are easier and more family happy than most others without much training. So for a starter maybe (as you have had large dogs before) I might go in that direction. Anatolians (kangal) are supposed to be reasonably user friendly too, I have never owned one, so not talking from personal experience here although a few friends have them, but are part of the heavier hitters but the gentler side if you want to push the boundaries a bit.

    But the best advice I can give is research the breeds each in turn and see which matches best to your and family personality and needs. I would do it mathematically if you can, pros and cons matrix, and talk to experienced owners of each breed.

    And get a female first :) Guardians breed males are far more aggressive and ... er... difficult control wise. That goes as a generalisation for most LGDs. You can always get a male later. Also females tend to be better with the family (not always but most of the time).
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2014
    hilarie likes this.