LGD puppy developed bowing of legs

Beekissed

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Awww..... they both look so sweet, waiting on their food! Sentry ALWAYS sits, wiggly and excited, but sits. Sheba-NOT! When we had out grand daughters last weekend, the youngest took Sentry's bowl to feed him. I told her to tell him to sit, she did and he did. I told her to tell him to take it, she did and he did. She liked that.

Pinkie is looking so healthy and strong. She is a lovely pup and is making an awesome dog.

Isn't it cool when they "get it"? It took this pup so very long...the very first time, she laid down like she knew what to do. Every time after that, no way.....she just couldn't grasp the concept for so long and no amount of training like I had used with the other dogs yielded anything in her mind. Finally, I just kept taking her bowl back every time she moved and would let Blue start eating because he waited properly. Well, that finally got her attention and the light came on. Now she lays down before he does!

I love letting the grandgirls help in feeding...it really helps the dogs get used to little ones being around their food while they are eating. I monitor it closely so the dogs could never lunge out unexpectedly towards the girls. Much like your good dog, Sentry, these dogs will sit and lie down for the girls but no amount of them saying the release word will get those dogs to budge an inch. That always frustrates Aliza. :gig She just doesn't understand why that happens that way.

Bay, I still haven't leash trained Pinky...she screams and makes such a fuss that I need to schedule blocks of time to tame that wild animal and I just haven't had the time lately. The other dogs I had time of a morning to do a little leash training each day and just a little training here and there did it. I've never had one scream and squall like she does...she's a whole other breed of cat. :rolleyes:
 

Baymule

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What about a long leash, just clip it on and let her drag it for awhile, while you are out there with her. Give her a treat, if she will take it. Then unclip the leash, praise her profusely.

Granddaughter #3 helped me feed Sheba too. Sheba had a bone and a tiny, very quiet growl came from Sheba. I very calmly scolded her, took the bone out of her mouth and fussed at her. She was crushed. Sentry did the same thing, all it took was one low key scolding. Anatolians are awesome.
 

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What about a long leash, just clip it on and let her drag it for awhile, while you are out there with her. Give her a treat, if she will take it. Then unclip the leash, praise her profusely.

Granddaughter #3 helped me feed Sheba too. Sheba had a bone and a tiny, very quiet growl came from Sheba. I very calmly scolded her, took the bone out of her mouth and fussed at her. She was crushed. Sentry did the same thing, all it took was one low key scolding. Anatolians are awesome.
Yes, they are! Very intelligently frustrating. She don't mind wearing a leash it's just when it restricts her movement that she screams. All other dogs I've leashed trained "get it" within a few short minutes...you walk, the leash isn't tight. You walk without pulling you get treats and lots of praise. She doesn't seem to get it. I think she may be a left brain dog. :D =D She'd likely drag a leash all day long and not care...but pick it up to direct her in a direction, then the screaming, squalling and rolling on the ground commences. Never saw such a drama queen in all my life! I'll have to try different tactics on her, most likely, than I have with the others...she is much more stubborn. These females are way different than the males, I'm finding.

Blue, on the other hand, is WAY too smart for his own good. We've been having to apply the shock collar for something he's been doing, but he knows when he's wearing it, then doesn't do the bad thing...he also knows if the battery is dead or if we aren't home to give the correction, then he proceeds to do the bad behavior. So, it's very hard to use the shock collar to correct this dog.

You are WAY more patient than I am, Bay....that first tiny growl gets a huge escalation from me. Over the top, surprising, unforgettable and anything but calm. I've never had one of the dogs growl at the girls but they'd likely wake up in the next week if they did. I start pups out with me messing in their feed bowl while they eat...if they growl they get a bark/growl and a body flip far away from the bowl, then I stand over the food so they can't come back until I let them. Then I let them, but put my hand back in the bowl and mess with the food while they eat. Haven't had any of them growl again after that. So far, only the females have growled that first growl, that I can recall. It's always the girls, huh?
 

Baymule

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Yes, our girls are very smart and very stubborn. Such a challenge! So rewarding when the light goes on and they get it. Pinkie has learned to throw a screaming fit and she wins. You are just going to have to out last her.
 

Beekissed

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Yes, our girls are very smart and very stubborn. Such a challenge! So rewarding when the light goes on and they get it. Pinkie has learned to throw a screaming fit and she wins. You are just going to have to out last her.
Yes....I think that's the key with this one. Persistence and maybe changing tactics...the ones that work with other dogs just aren't going to work with this one. I'll have to make her think that walking on the leash is her idea. :D
 

rachels.haven

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Not sure this will work, but have you tried tying her to another dog and walking that dog on a leash and going on a high rewards walk? Or lead her with another dog or two on a walk? Sometimes they really HATE getting left behind especially if that herd/pack power is there motivating them like an invisible leash and they care less about being led.
 

Beekissed

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Not sure this will work, but have you tried tying her to another dog and walking that dog on a leash and going on a high rewards walk? Or lead her with another dog or two on a walk? Sometimes they really HATE getting left behind especially if that herd/pack power is there motivating them like an invisible leash and they care less about being led.
I haven't tried that yet but was contemplating it, most definitely. The last training session I did, when she started screaming about walking on the leash, Blue finally had enough and snarled and lunged at her. That shut her up real quick, so I'm thinking about walking them together when next I train but haven't gotten to it yet.
 
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